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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am hearing about at the right time of the child's development to teach certain things. In preschool and kindergarten I understand but I don't get in the elementry and high schools though why do they pile on all these challenging subsjects. Talk about stress.
 

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First of all, your baby just started nursery school, right? So don't worry about elementary, middle, or high school when that's years away. You have enough to think about already. When your child's in kindergarten, you can start thinking about elementary school. Stressing about the years to come won't benefit you or your baby. Focus on the present and the year to come.

Second of all, what exactly are you talking about? Do you mean challenging subjects in Waldorf school or in general? Which subjects do you feel are challenging?

If you're talking about Waldorf, the entire curriculum is designed to work in harmony with itself. Each subject compliments the other subjects. When you're doing handwork, you're also learning geometry. When you do music, you're learning problem solving and maths skills. When you do eurythmy, you're learning grammar and public speaking skills. Particularly for 8th grade and under, the Waldorf curriculum is beautifully designed, and what comes out is a well rounded person, ready to face the world. The arts in Waldorf aren't an extracurricular. They ARE the curriculum. And the brain doesn't stop developing when a child reaches 1st grade! The brain continues to lay down pathways, connect synapses, build critical thinking and problem solving skills - and Waldorf helps the child do this best by providing tactile and movement oriented learning, as well as intellectual learning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
First of all, your baby just started nursery school, right? So don't worry about elementary, middle, or high school when that's years away. You have enough to think about already. When your child's in kindergarten, you can start thinking about elementary school. Stressing about the years to come won't benefit you or your baby. Focus on the present and the year to come.

Second of all, what exactly are you talking about? Do you mean challenging subjects in Waldorf school or in general? Which subjects do you feel are challenging?

If you're talking about Waldorf, the entire curriculum is designed to work in harmony with itself. Each subject compliments the other subjects. When you're doing handwork, you're also learning geometry. When you do music, you're learning problem solving and maths skills. When you do eurythmy, you're learning grammar and public speaking skills. Particularly for 8th grade and under, the Waldorf curriculum is beautifully designed, and what comes out is a well rounded person, ready to face the world. The arts in Waldorf aren't an extracurricular. They ARE the curriculum. And the brain doesn't stop developing when a child reaches 1st grade! The brain continues to lay down pathways, connect synapses, build critical thinking and problem solving skills - and Waldorf helps the child do this best by providing tactile and movement oriented learning, as well as intellectual learning.
Thank you. Oh I'm not worrying over my son. I was just asking a separate question.
 

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Thank you. Oh I'm not worrying over my son. I was just asking a separate question.
What was the separate question? Are you concerned over challenges in Waldorf schools, or are you concerned over challenges in public education in the secondary years? To some extent it matters because you will get different responses in different forums, depending on what you are asking! :)
 

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I did a little bit of waldorf high school as a student and my daughter spent three years in a waldorf high school. My granddaughter is in her second year.

All three of us had a good time. I've attended a lot of different schools and colleges in my life and what was always wonderful about waldorf was that nothing was isolated or abstract. It is much easier to learn when the subjects connect and are presented in a coherent way.

I'll give an example. When my daughter was learning math in high school the teacher always insisted that they work all the way through a question and understand not just the "how" but the why. When she was in college doing advanced math for an engineering degree, her professor asked her, quite seriously, if she would consider becoming a mathematician. As far as she could work out, this was because she was one of the only students who insisted on mastering the principals of what they were studying, not just the "how to do it" and pass the test.

Waldorf lays a great foundation for further study and for work.
 
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