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I"m wondering what kinds of activities other waldorfy homeshoolers plan for their kids (hm, i guess if activities are planned, then that's not really unschooling)? Are there any books that you would reccomend? Any curriculums that you pull ideas from? What kinds of waldorfy things do you 'strew into the paths of your children"? And do you have any ideas on how to unschool while incorporating waldorf ideals?
 

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We are Waldorf Unschoolers as this is what we have metamorphosed to be! I concentrate on keeping a rhythm in our day, week, and year. I guide the children back and forth between expanding and contracting. Our days are usually gentle and flowing and the boys know what to expect each day.

When we are out some place and it is time to go and the kids are engaged in learning I will wait a bit longer and respect that they are taking this time to explore the pond, or whatever.

I follow a Waldorf based curric, but when my son becomes interested in something we explore it. I also acknowledge that learning happens all the time weather I see it or not.

Great Waldorf Book Over The Rainbow Bridge

http://christopherushomeschool.org/

All of Donna Simmons' books are great and she does talk about unschooling in her books.
 

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We have lots of materials- a basket of beeswax crayons and plenty of paper, a basket of wool roving and a felt board, a basket of sewing stuff, etc- that are available all the time.

Personally, I have found that getting into a groove myself- actually planning a rhythm for cleaning, baking, etc- and having child-sized materials really stirs up an interest in my kids. If they know I am going to be baking bread on Monday, or hanging dipes on Tuesday, they are right there next to me, helping me out.

Also, little stories and songs that go along with daily routines really draw them in. The Naturally You Can Sing series (esp. This Is the Way We Wash-a-Day) has some nice songs for work times and for daily routines. We make up a lot of stories, as well as drawing from more classical sources.

Hope that helps!
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by mama_kass
We are Waldorf Unschoolers as this is what we have metamorphosed to be! I concentrate on keeping a rhythm in our day, week, and year. I guide the children back and forth between expanding and contracting. Our days are usually gentle and flowing and the boys know what to expect each day.

Could you explain what this means? I love the idea of a daily rhythm, but how do you achieve that?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by jessicaSAR
Could you explain what this means? I love the idea of a daily rhythm, but how do you achieve that?
I could be totally out in left field on this one :LOL (sorry, lame joke about my username), but isn't it like dividing the day up into activity segments? Once upon a time, I ordered an Oak Meadow kindergarten curric and I *think* they talked about that. It was something like, after circle time, the kids play for an hour while you do your housework or handcrafts, then you do something together, then they play off somewhere while you work again for an hour, then you do art together, then you split up again, something like that.
 

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Well, we're not Waldorf, but we are unschoolers and we like some of the natural elements of Waldorf. I really liked the book, "Earthways". It had seasonal crafts for preschool aged children, in addition to discussion on how to maintain a nature table.

There's another book I liked, but I seem to have misplaced it. It was, "Children at Play : Using Waldorf Principles to Foster Childhood Development"
by Heidi Britz-Crecelius. The book was not instructional, but it talks about nature, seasons, the child's connection to the earth, etc. It was more anecdotal than anything else, but it was one of those inspirational books that makes you want to run out and look at the moon or something. I remember that there was a story about flying kites that was great. It was just a feel-good book, from a Waldorf perspective. It's been a while since I've read it, but I don't remember it having the whole Waldorf structure or rules stuff, just the natural stuff, which could certainly be used in unschooling. It kind of made me want to move to a farm. Seriously, it was an inspiring book.
 

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Thanks Left Field!
Your book suggestions sound great!!! I will first check my library... that's one good thing about NYC public libraries- they have everything!!!!
Thanks again.

I thought I had come across a good website called waldorfunschoolers.org Anyone else heard of it?
 
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