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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
And then there were 2...<br><br>
So, we have Suzie, an almost 6 month-old husky mix (female) and now we have Oreo, almost 4 months old, who is a cardigan corgi (male). Both were adopted from people who couldn't care for them.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:<br><br>
It's been about a week, and things are going well in general. Walking has been a trial. Really. I had been walking them apart, and have started to try to walk them together as of last night. I have problems with Suzie pulling in general, although we got a doggie backpack and it's REALLY helped. But if we are just running out for a quick walk, trying to keep Oreo from being strangled while I try to keep Suzie from "taking off" is really starting to HURT!<br><br>
I have tried "tiring out" Suzie first before all of us walking together, and I think it helps, but after walking for a little bit, I still end up frustrated, tangled up in leads, and sore. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Should I just walk them apart until I get Suzie's desire to pull me like a dogsled under control?<br><br>
sigh.
 

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What collar are you using on Suzie?<br><br>
And--though this has nothing to do with the pulling issue--where did Oreo come from? Was he an owner adoption or did he go back to his breeder or a rescue and then come to you? (The reason I ask is that there are only a few bad Cardigan breeders around, so anytime I hear of someone who has an adopted Cardigan I want to make sure that his breeder knows where he ended up and that he's safe).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: Well, on Suzie... right now I only have a flat buckle collar. I use a 6ft nylon lead. We tried an easy walker harness (can't remember the name), but it was miserable- we couldn't get it to fit correctly no matter what we did, and she STILL pulled and got tangled and I was truly afriad she'd get hurt.<br><br>
We purchased one of those head leads, but I was kinda freaked that it came with a DVD for instructions! I was hesistant to use it without a demonstration, and after reading all this stuff about head leads, I just don't want to use it now. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> Like I said, the doggie back pack helps alot, but it's not perfect. And the biggest problem is me, I'm sure. I'm not employing the techniques I should be using on a regular basis. Bad dog mommy!<br><br>
FTR, the funny thing is, I used to work for a kennel and could handle dogs well. I think it's my emotional attachment to Suzie that's screwing this up for me, how weird.<br><br>
As for Oreo, that's kind of a weird story, and I don't want to give anyone a bad name, so to speak. Can I pm you that info? The people we adopted him from were not breeders and had too many other dogs to care for.
 

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Yes, you can absolutely PM me.<br><br>
As I am sure you know, northern dogs are absolutely programmed to pull. So I would definitely put her on a prong and I'd still walk her on her own until you and she are communicating better (the prong suddenly enables them to feel their own neck again, so it's good to have a few days of intense re-training to help them understand how to walk politely and what a leash signal feels like). Once she's listening to you consistently, there's no reason you can't walk them together--Cardis are speedy little things when they want to be and he should be able to trot beside her while she is walking.<br><br>
Edited: Part of the issue is their ages. Two puppies close in age tend to be about four gazillion times the trouble of one. Neither is firmly under control (not your fault--no puppy is really under control) and neither has the maturity to ignore the nonsense generated by the other. So I would not expect magic instantly--you'll need to work at this over the next few months, not the next few hours.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I don't know how to properly use a prong collar, is there a good place to find out? I had considered it, but I guess I have the same fears about not knowing how to properly use the collar.<br><br>
I think I will go back to walking them at different times. It took more time, obviously, but was alot less stressful!<br><br>
I'll pm the story when I have a little more time to type.<br><br>
Thanks for the info!
 

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Joanna- I just read the article you posted but I still have a question. It states at first use to hook the leash so that the tightening action does not occur. I am not sure how I would do this. Do you have any articles that have pictures of how the collar hooks up and looks while on the dog? Thanks-
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mamamillet</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9127001"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Joanna- I just read the article you posted but I still have a question. It states at first use to hook the leash so that the tightening action does not occur. I am not sure how I would do this. Do you have any articles that have pictures of how the collar hooks up and looks while on the dog? Thanks-</div>
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Maybe this will help?? <a href="http://www.leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm" target="_blank">http://www.leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm</a>
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>k9rider</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9136357"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Maybe this will help?? <a href="http://www.leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm" target="_blank">http://www.leerburg.com/fit-prong.htm</a></div>
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Yeah, it's the very last picture that you want. You attach the leash to both the live and dead rings.<br><br>
Leerburg recommends putting the collar up high; Suzanne Clothier prefers it half-way up the neck. Both of them are right. The top of the neck is the area that has the most nervous tissue and the least protection from muscle, so it gives the most sensation to the dog. If you are an experienced handler who knows how to give a very gentle, sensitive signal to a dog, the high position is most effective. If you want to make absolutely sure that you do not over-correct the dog, having the collar lower is safer (you can always move it up).
 

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How tight should it be? I've got our pup on a small prong, it seems tight, but clearly isn't as it falls down her neck after a few minutes. I can get a finger under the prong part and it fits comfortably. She also has a lot of fur right under her ears so I think that's messing me up on the fit, as it feels tight, but I think it's just her fur catching the prongs.<br><br>
~Julia
 

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Well, first of all a prong is never left on a dog. It's only for walking or training. So if the dog is walking around with it on, take it off.<br><br>
In terms of how tight it should be while you are walking the dog, the answer is snug enough that it doesn't fall to the base of the neck, but not so tight that the dog is being "corrected" just by having the collar on. It shouldn't slip over the head, either--you should be unconnecting one link to take it off and put it on.
 

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She only wears the prong when we're outside or training. She goes collarless inside as the her martingale rubs her fur off (and it's a narrow one too!).<br><br>
Well, I might try removing one more then as her's always slowly sinks down her neck. She's got a really thin neck for a dog her size and it keeps throwing me off when I try to buy collars, I keep getting them too big!<br><br>
Thanks,<br><br>
~Julia
 

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I used to have the same problem also. I have a JRT who is 2 years older than a yeloow lab/husky mix. The lab mix is def a puller so we started using the prong collar on her after she was 1 year and 70lbs. and that worked really well. She gets a verbal command to heel before she gets that picnch from the collar, but the only time that we have to give her the pinch is if there is a squirrel or rabbit teasing her. She learned very quickly with the collar. Now the JRT is such a stubborn dog that i don't believe that his will will ever be overpowered by anyone else<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> So he is in a harness and gets the same verbal command to heel but it on works about 50% of the time. And they are both on 16 foot extender leashes.<br><br>
I was always afraid of the pich collars, but if you use it properly it is very effective:)
 
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