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We live in Denver, CO and are completely re-landscaping our yard. When we moved in last June we had a yard full of thorns, bind weed, some grass, a couple of fruit trees and a crab apple smack dab in the middle of the yard.<br><br>
We've torn everything up, created a kids play area, built a privacy fence, laid out beds, new sod all around, flagstone walkways and patio, planted shrubs (forsythia and dogwood thus far - much more to do), several perenials (xeric types), and lots of annuals for instant color gratification.<br><br>
Now we need to choose two more trees. We were leaning towards a japanese maple for one corner of the house where we need something 15-20ft. and either ornamental or a conifer. But I've learned that while they can do OK in our climate, the late spring snows and frosts pose big risks since they leaf out early.<br><br>
Anyone have any other suggestions? It will be with a forsythia and the dogwood with a "field" of daisies in front of it.<br><br>
The other will be a shade tree and we'll likely go with a maple but are still researching the best variety.
 

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I'd go to the Tree Farm. Its north of Denver, actually right near us. They know soil in specific areas of the Denver Metro area. We had a tree in mind and when they asked where we lived they said well if you were about 3 miles west that tree would be perfect. However the soil in your area is very different and pointed out about 5 other options for us. Our neighbor planted the tree we were originally going to go with - there's is now dead. The recommended tree in our yard is thriving. We know someone in Littleton who comes up here for there trees as well and they've had the same service.<br><br>
If you are willing to wait until September they have a 2 for 1 sale and there trees are great quality.
 

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Look around at trees in your area that are growing well and look healthy.<br><br>
IMO, planting a native tree is a much safer bet than an ornamental that might have more problems for your climate.<br><br>
Do NOT plant a Bradford pear, they are evil and and their branches tend to break in ice and storms.<br><br><br>
I am not huge on maples as they vomit those helicopter things everywhere. My neighbor has a HUGE maple and it makes a mess. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Which corner is your tree site on for the Japanese maple? It would probably do best with an eastern exposure and some protection. We have a site (in Arvada!) that has an eastern exposure is sloped and we are putting in a retaining wall. The landscaper mentioned that the JM would do well near there with the protection of the house, the wall, and the eastern exposure.<br><br>
Have you considered a Redbud? There are some beauties! Also a Chanticleer Pear is a nice ornamental pear. It doesn't have magnificent fall color though. We are planning for the Chan. Pear, but our landscaper suggested a Candy Apple Crab. He said that they have gorgeous little apples on them in bright red for a month in the fall. I just tried to find them online for you and couldn't. I might have the name wrong. He's really excited about this tree though...lol!<br><br>
What about a Toba Thornless Cockspur? Those are pretty and do well here. It can be grown with a single trunk or multiple.<br><br>
Good luck with your landscaping! We are pretty overwhelmed with it ourselves. We need things done that we really can't afford and it's stressful! This week they are redoing our sewer line. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Thanks for all the ideas. Actually the spot we were considering for the JM is exactly as you describe...eastern exposure and protected. I just hate to make the investment in one and have it die. Everything I read scared me! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
I would like a redbud but dh isn't crazy about them for some reason. I saw a dappled willow the other day that looked pretty cool. I need to read up on them some more. Another thought was to just put in a lilac in that spot.<br><br>
We are going to go to the Tree Farm...this is about the 20th recommendation we've gotten for them! :)<br><br>
I'm now thinking about maybe a Mountain Ash for the shade tree. My ideal would be a Linden - I LOVE the honeysuckle scent in the spring. Dh thinks they smell like dog piss...so no lindens for us <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Our soil is looking pretty good as we dig around. I moved the crab tree two weekends ago and its looking good.
 

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I'm not that fond of Lindens either. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck">: They tend to look really stressed out in the heat.<br><br>
There is a new product called Myke's. It's a fungus that needs a host (your plant roots). It makes the roots take really well. There are a few nurseries around town that are offering a 5 year guarantee on their perennials, trees and bushes if you use Myke's when you plant them. I know that Timberline in Arvada is doing it and also Echters. You have to have the Myke's purchased on the ticket with the item you are planting I believe. Might be worth checking out!
 

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P.S. There is some critter destroying ash trees east of us. I don't know if it's crossed the Mississippi or not, but it's made me a bit reluctant to plant an ash. It's really created a mess!<br><br><a href="http://www.emeraldashborer.info/" target="_blank">http://www.emeraldashborer.info/</a>
 
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