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My ds1 ( 2.5 years old) has a made up language<br><br>
I have thought and researched a great deal about him having a speach delay but he "talks" all the time<br><br>
He sys about 20 English words but the rest is all made up words he has for things<br><br>
ANd there is no shortage of communication in our house<br><br>
But's is starting to drive me nuts b/c I want to teach him his numbers and all the says is "kdfjakoghjajkfghjkaghk;ja"<br>
mama<br><br>
Any suggestions???????<br><br><br>
Signed, All blabbed out!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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I think that just talking to him in a normal language rather than babbling back to him will eventually get him to talk back to him. He'll probably grow out of it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug"> I know that can drive you insane.
 

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people laugh at me when i respond to my 21month old's "kajsdfchcbei skjh skjdbcie" with "i suppose we could do that later, but right now we are eating lunch"<br><br>
just keep using regular words and talking in normal sentences and he'll get it. you could always have him evaluated for early intervention (it's no charge to you) for peace of mind. you might get some good information about pre-language skills and what he's already mastering and what he still needs to accomplish.<br><br>
i suspect they will not be too concerned until he's a bit older, especially if he is using intonations and "words", albeit ones that you don't understand. but peace of mind of the mama is priceless compared to a thousand opinions of mamas.<br><br>
~claudia
 

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Are you a "No TV!" house? B/c I swear, <i>Sesame Street</i> videos are where my kids picked up their numbers & alphabet, particularly <i>Sesame Sings Karaoke</i> (which we've agreed to call "La la la"). Might be worth a try.<br><br>
My kids' speech is pretty blurry, though - I have to work to remember what "woouesee" stands for, some days I forget.<br><br>
My Mom said that on Wednesday, when she was babysitting, my ds wanted her to read <i>Where the Wild Things Are</i>. Which he calls "Wiyoou". I'd forgotten to tell her what that meant.<br><br>
She was sitting on the floor playing with them & he kept saying "Wiyoou" "Wiyoou" and she says, "Hon, I don't understand what you're saying". So he walks up to her, puts his little hand on her shoulder and gets his face about three inches from hers. "W i y o o u" he says slowly & clearly, like "duh, I guess Granny's kind of slow on the uptake".<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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Using TV to try to teach your child anything is not a good idea. Just working with them would be better.<br><br><br>
He might just not be ready yet. It's frustrating, but it will pass (I know that doesn't help you now though).
 

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i took care of a little boy and when he was about that same age he made up an entire language of swear words!i thought it was genius!<br>
and don't worry now at age 10 he knows all the real swear words and how to use them.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Kathryn</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Using TV to try to teach your child anything is not a good idea.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/rolleyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="rolleyes"><br><br>
Take a look at <a href="http://mothering.com/discussions/showthread.php?t=424671" target="_blank">this MDC thread</a>, and you'll see plenty of Approved Crunchy Mamas admitting to use of videos and/or television.<br><br>
Blanket statements are not a good idea. But hey, whatever.
 

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Roll your eyes at me if you want. Nowhere did I say watching TV was a horrible thing. My daughter watches it. However, USING TV to TEACH your child things, IS a bad idea. I don't understand why <b>you</b> can't teach instead of using the TV to teach. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"> If I was the OP, I would resent your implication that her child isn't talking because he's not watching TV. That's like saying that your child won't learn to pull up or walk if you don't put them in a crib.
 

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And they are also gaining a huge chance of getting ADD and loosing their ability to play by themselves. They are also not only learning their ABC's (which you could easily teach them on your own), but they are also learning which products they should buy and how Kelloggs makes your grow and Juicy Juice is 100% juice.
 

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Mine don't watch commercials. That's why I specified videos in my initial post. And when mine just happened to pick things up from videos, I was delighted. Singing the ABC song with Elmo reinforced the books, puzzles, toys, etc. we have here. Which we play with. Fer cryin' out loud.<br><br>
But if TV viewing causes ADD, why does your dd watch? Not that it's been "proven" or anything - <i>Brain, Child</i> had a terrific article on the flaws in the initial study a while back.<br><br>
And I don't think my post implied that the OP was denying her child anything. Really, you leave me puzzled. Seems like your main goal is to have a big hissy. Whatever.
 

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I'm a former Waldorf teacher and my toddler has Sesame Street videos out from the library <i>because they're fun.</i> And an image from my childhood that I want my children to have. Not daily infinite-repeat DVDs of Sesame Street or loads of commercial junk, but an affection for the talent Jim Henson and Frank Oz had together. Children do learn from everything and it is ok for them to learn a little something from an electronic medium once in a while. It is not poison. Enjoying <span style="text-decoration:underline;">Count With Me</span> or an ABC video is not going to give them "a huge chance of getting ADD" or losing imagination. Hours upon hours of television as an electronic babysitter might do that, but it's really a lifestyle issue, and hardly the only factor in something as serious as Attention Deficit Disorders.<br><br>
To the OP: my husband had his own language until about 2 1/2, at which point he spoke in complete sentences. Fifteen years later he was applying to MIT and Caltech, so it was hardly an issue in the long run! My son has had his own way of saying things for some time and, of course, we understand him better than anyone because his words are not that clear, and he is often quiet around others. Lately a ton of English words have been pouring out. Every child matures at their own rate. He's a little young (IMO) for numbers or ABCs, anyway, unless he's driven to it without any other influence. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>GeezerMom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Mine don't watch commercials. That's why I specified videos in my initial post. And when mine just happened to pick things up from videos, I was delighted. Singing the ABC song with Elmo reinforced the books, puzzles, toys, etc. we have here. Which we play with. Fer cryin' out loud.<br><br>
But if TV viewing causes ADD, why does your dd watch? Not that it's been "proven" or anything - <i>Brain, Child</i> had a terrific article on the flaws in the initial study a while back.<br><br>
And I don't think my post implied that the OP was denying her child anything. Really, you leave me puzzled. Seems like your main goal is to have a big hissy. Whatever.</div>
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My child watches rarely when I get migraines and simply can't care for her. My main goal was not to have a big hissy, I would like for you to stop "knowing" my actions. You said something in your post, I said something in my post. Wasn't rude or directed towards you. You responded to it in a rude manner, I responded to you. How am <i>I</i> the one having the big hissy?<br><br><br>
To the OP, I remain on my stance. Your child is fine and normal and doesn't need a TV teacher.
 

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I wish my boy had a made up language most of the time! Especially for the swear words!<br><br>
When I was little, I had my own made up language until I was 4. I could read by the time I got to kindergarten. I used to drive my mom CRAZY. I guess what she did is kept talking to me normally and let me watch a little Sesame Street. I speak english now instead of Mindese. That's what they used to call it.<br><br>
A little television never did my boy Hank any harm. If they're interested, they're interested. He likes to watch things about anything with wheels like Tractors or Trains, the rest of the time, he ignores the television and my elderly mother in law has it on pretty much 24/7. We go to the park and feed the chickens and other outdoor stuff. He's not glued to the television all the time.<br><br>
I read this article in what I believe was brain,child where this mother was injecting plain yogurt into a squeezable tube of Strawberry yogurt so the little girl would get less sugar but appear to be the same on the outside.<br><br>
That example makes you wonder how far we will go in this "better than thou" attitude that often displaces me here on MDC. Child rearing is not a competition and mothers should support eachother, not tear eachother down.<br><br>
For the OP: Don't worry about it, speech will come in time. I don't think your guy will be speaking gibberish at his high school graduation. Be mindful but don't be over fearful okay?<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 

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Jesi, my twins had a made up language for quite a while. My daughter relied on it more than my son, but it got them through. Each child will speak when he/she is ready to. That being said, if <b>you</b> feel it is an issue or a problem, I would recommend having him evaluated by a speech therapist. My twins were evaluated at 3 and DXed with speech delay.<br><br>
Now, almost three years later, my daughter is speaking complete sentences and can verbalize most things. She is still having difficulty with expression, but it will come in time.<br><br>
And, you know, my parents recommended that they "watch TV" to help them "learn to speak."<br><br>
All I can say is that it has little to no value.
 

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My DS called books " my-yos " until very recently. He had many words made up for things. He also called all animals by the sound they made, instead of their name.<br>
Well, at almost three , it is all gone. I miss it. Calling a book a " book " just isn't quite as fun.<br>
It will pass. I think it is all part of childhood and language acquisition.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>hankiesmama</strong></div>
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That example makes you wonder how far we will go in this "better than thou" attitude that often displaces me here on MDC. Child rearing is not a competition and mothers should support eachother, not tear eachother down.<br><br></div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap">
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>JesiLynne</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My ds1 ( 2.5 years old) has a made up language<br><br>
I have thought and researched a great deal about him having a speach delay but he "talks" all the time<br><br>
He sys about 20 English words but the rest is all made up words he has for things<br><br>
ANd there is no shortage of communication in our house<br><br>
But's is starting to drive me nuts b/c I want to teach him his numbers and all the says is "kdfjakoghjajkfghjkaghk;ja"<br>
mama<br><br>
Any suggestions???????<br><br><br>
Signed, All blabbed out!<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"></div>
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Back to the original post, maybe?<br><br>
I copied this because I don't know why simple, direct discussion-opener posts like this turn into magnets for personal attacks<br>
about, sigh, the age-old argument about whether television watching has any value for small children. These devolutions into off-topic nasty arguments make people who genuinely believe in a lot of what this community stands for never even want to ask a simple question or post a simple, well-intentioned reply.<br><br>
The OP says herself that she has considered and researched language development and possible delays. Can we stop talking to/about her as though she's stupid? She asked for some suggestions the way any of us would at a playgroup or meeting. Would we speak to each other this way in person? I hope not!<br><br>
Watching Sesame Street or Baby Einstein <i>very well might</i> help this toddler learn to say his numbers correctly, and that's what his mother, the OP, has expressed an interest in encouraging. He knows she understands him, so a video might actually pique his interest.<br><br>
It is certainly not going to "turn" him ADD any more than playing dolls is going to make him gay, any more than Baby Einstein is going to make him smarter.<br><br>
I personally don't care to hear "justifications" for why people let their children watch TV. It's none of my business and I don't think one is more "AP-approved" than another. It doesn't matter what your reasons are, if you let your kid watch TV,you let them watch TV.<br><br>
My opinion is to enjoy it while it lasts, because it does pass so quickly. At least make sure you have plenty of recordings/videos, because you *will* forget even though that seems impossible. And you will treasure hearing it again. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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When my son was 2, he was a cat. "Meow" was the answer I got to almost everything I tried to talk with him about. He had different meows for yes & no. Eventually I just started mis-understanding, so he had to make himself clear to get his wants met (I also routinely offered to cook up some fishheads for him for supper <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/blush.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="blush"> that usually scared a non catish answer out of him!) To teach your son his numbers, one thing you might try is choosing your words in a way that he has to use them "How many times should mommy throw the ball?" "Would you like two crackers or three?"
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>GeezerMom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My Mom said that on Wednesday, when she was babysitting, my ds wanted her to read <i>Where the Wild Things Are</i>. Which he calls "Wiyoou". I'd forgotten to tell her what that meant.<br><br>
She was sitting on the floor playing with them & he kept saying "Wiyoou" "Wiyoou" and she says, "Hon, I don't understand what you're saying". So he walks up to her, puts his little hand on her shoulder and gets his face about three inches from hers. "W i y o o u" he says slowly & clearly, like "duh, I guess Granny's kind of slow on the uptake".<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"></div>
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Mummoth</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">When my son was 2, he was a cat. "Meow" was the answer I got to almost everything I tried to talk with him about. He had different meows for yes & no. Eventually I just started mis-understanding, so he had to make himself clear to get his wants met (I also routinely offered to cook up some fishheads for him for supper that usually scared a non catish answer out of him!)</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I about died laughing at both of these stories!<br><br>
I'm not quite with you all yet on language development as ds is only 15 months old. He has his "own language" in the sense that he is trying really hard to mimic what we say but just can't make all the sounds yet. He's only recently begun to master making two syllables for a two or more syllable word. He talks to us constantly, and when he really wants something, we know what he's saying.<br><br>
I am tearing my hair out with the "oh poor me, I didn't get what I wanted exactly when I wanted it" pity parties ds is throwing lately. He likes to kind of melt to the ground and cry or whine. I especially like when he gets rubber arms and I can't pick him up. I usually have to carry him out of a store or room around his middle like a flailing animal. That's fun. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 
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