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How do you wash your produce? I'm concerned about ecoli in our leafy greens. I was just reading that soaking them in vinegar can kill some ecoli. Anyone hear of other ways to do this?<br><br><a href="http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/FOODNUT/09369.html" target="_blank">http://www.ext.colostate.edu/PUBS/FOODNUT/09369.html</a><br><br>
Recent studies have shown that soaking in vinegar is a particularly effective way to reduce E. coli O157:H7 on fresh produce such as lettuce and apples. Soak in distilled white vinegar for three to five minutes, stirring occasionally. Rinse with clean tap water to remove vinegar flavor. Wash only what is needed immediately. Washing earlier could give the remaining bacteria time to grow again.
 

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Hm, I guess that makes sense, but I think the main concern about the e coli is that it's absorbed into the system of the vegetables--that's why, with the last recall, they were stressing that you shouldn't try to wash the greens and eat them. I don't know, I guess I don't worry about it so much. I wash the rest of our fruits and veggies, organic and conventional, with hard-running water and baking soda, but I don't think that would work for greens!
 

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I didn't know you could use baking soda for washing produce--baking soda is awesome, but as you said, probably not good for greens!
 

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In the book Organic Housekeeping by Ellen Sandbeck, she says to keep one squirt bottle of white vinegar, and one of hydrogen peroxide (must be an opaque bottle or the hydrogen peroxide will turn to water from the reaction to the light). She says to first spray your vegetables or mean with the vinegar, then with the peroxide. Each kills some of the bacteria. The peroxide washes off the vinegar and itself just becomes water and oxygen very fast, leaving the vegetables clean.
 

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I wouldn't soak any leafy green in straight vinegar. Vinegar will cook your produce in strong concentrations, and a 3-5 minutes soak of leafy greens will probably leave you with a pile of sour cooked salad.<br><br>
If the produce is not coming from somewhere I trust, I give it a good rinse under running water. But I buy my salad greens from a local organic farmer, and they pick and wash before bagging, so I eat them straight out of the bag.
 
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