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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We're adopting a cocker spaniel today, or else it will go to our pound where they put animals down in a gas chamber.
I didn't even think that would be allowed but they've actually written about it in our local paper. So I can't let him go there. I've owned dogs before, but never a long eared dog. And I don't know anything else specific to Cocker Spaniels, like specific health concerns, etc. What should I know? DH and the kids have met the dog, he was friendly and even let DH look at his teeth without resisting, and he's been groomed without resisting - he's being fostered right now by a dog groomer but she can't keep him any longer. He looks bure bred and might be registered (though we'll never know, will we) but not by a responsable breeder becaue it sounds like his colors are not the breed standard. But like I said I don't know much about the standard. Which is why I asked about potential health problems. He looked well taken care of and the groomer said he had probably been groomed in the last 3 months. But no one has claimed him.
 

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What color is he? It's just curiosity, not anything serious.

Well, the VERY best scenario is to make friendly advances to a local Cocker breeder and see if they're willing to give you an hour on the phone to talk about the breed. That's far more valuable than the responses you'll get on a general board, as much as I like this board.

Just generally, regular grooming is a must. Ear care is not an ordeal, but it needs to be something you think about--ask the groomer to give you a little tutorial. Cockers often have iffy temperaments--I wouldn't assume that things are bad, especially since he seems friendly, but I would certainly make overtures to a good trainer. Many of them can do a personal eval of a dog for about a hundred bucks; that's a great investment to have a professional tell you if there are any things to be worried about for this particular dog.

And otherwise love and enjoy him!
 

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They are so cute. I had a cocker spaniel. They require daily (*at least* once a day) brushing and you have to be very careful that they don't matt. You can't really let them run outside where there are weeds (like those dry, tall kind) because they very easily get them caught down in their ears and it's $ to get them removed. They have been known to bite children and not be very patient with little ones. So I would recommend really "bomb proofing" him as much as possible and doing a lot of training with him. Also watch him very carefully w/kids who are not your own. Mine seemed to have a better temperment than others I've met. He was a black one. Very sweet and well behaved. My friend has a brown one and she and her kids adore him, but I would never leave my kids alone w/him. It may just be that all the ones I've met weren't trained well but...I notice they all seem to be "barkers." I hope you do rescue this dog. Good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Okay, he's home with us. Benji named him "Broccoli."
He's black with a little too much white, like white on his feet, which I don't think is allowed. Not enough white to be parti color though. Seems very nice but was probably an outside dog because he went searching around the house for a bathroom spot this AM, I had to take him to the door and let him out. Very laid back though. He had a choke collar on, which the lady who was fostering him said she found him with it on. You know how some people just use that for a regular collar.
He seems a little big for a cocker, though, maybe too tall, so maybe a mixed breed. I don't know I didn't measure him. Sweet dog though.
Will be taking him to the vet for checkup.
 

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Black with white paws can be found in very good Cocker litters, or when a breeder breeds black or ASCOB to a parti. It's a DQ, but nothing that I would automatically see as a red flag in terms of the breeder (just ask me how much I hate color DQs or prejudice in purebred dogs; it's a major soapbox of mine).

He sounds lovely--I am glad you got him!
 

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Congratulations on your new dog! We have a parti color cocker who is now 10 years old. He is such a sweetheart - I couldn't ask for a better dog. We keep him clipped very short so grooming is a breeze, just a shampoo and clip every three months or so. He was almost 6 years old when my granddaughter was born, and I was a little worried since you hear so much about cockers not being good with kids. Well, he has been wonderful. He loves her death and follows her around. When she was little and would nap on my sofa, he would lie down with her. He does get some gunky ears, especially when his ear hair get longer and heavy, but the vet gave us cleaner and ointment, and that clears it up right away. How old is your cocker and what color is he (she)?
 

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Just a personal observation that I'm guessing has no scientific backing....While I am never surprised to hear about a cocker with nastiness to kids....I have so far in my career only ever worked with ONE cocker who was not a tan that had serious issues.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by shannon0218
Oh sure....the chick with the blue danes hates colour pred in show dogs

Unfortunately, the prejudice against blues in Danes is mostly justified--we're just simply not as competitive. Ears, yeah, that's a bias, but I've never felt that I was beaten by a lesser dog of the "right" color. If I'm honest, my color dogs have faults that the others don't (particularly in head style).

What I think is insane and drives me up a wall is color-code breeding, where breeds are divided up into "you may breed to this one" and "you may not breed to that one" simply because of color, or where gorgeous, worthy dogs are penalized (or in worst cases bucketed as puppies) because white goes too far down the shoulder or the dog doesn't have enough makeup (color on the face).

I can improve blues in a very few generations if I'm allowed to access the fawn gene pool, but it's verboten. I broke the rule anyway for my last litter and got the prettiest blacks I've ever bred. Of course, for the next generation I have to find somebody that will let me breed my mixed-color blacks to their expletive-deleted color-pure blues.
 
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