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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I think that sucks.

I grew up with dogs, and I have always loved and adored them. I've been for a span of several years now without one, and desperately miss the companionship, and I would like an adult dog because I've researched and found that adult dogs are more likely to be in the mind set that we would like to have in our home with a 13 month old.

I want to adopt a pet that some one has fostered for a while and are pretty much familiar with it's temperament, and I want to save a life, and somebody put a bug in my ear that retired racing greyhounds were the way to go, and the more I researched the breed, the more I felt like a retired racing greyhound would be a good match for our family.

But I see far too many rescue organizations that have the rule that your child has to be at least 6 years of age or older before they will adopt, and while I understand why they do it, I don't think it's fair. I plan on being a SAHM far into the future, and have lots of time on my hands, and if I am matched with a dog that will fit our lifestyle, I am more than willing to go the rest of the way and rehabilitate any other problems that we may have with our future dog. The dog will be a part of our family, when you have problems with a family member, you work on fixing the problem you don't just chunk the family member away, that's my feelings on adopting a dog.

Too many people with kids and inexperienced with dogs hastily adopt a dog, and then return it at the hint of a problem, and these ones give families who desperately want a pet and are willing to work at problems and keep the pet for the entire duration of it's life a hard time when the rescue organizations starts to make these blanket rules.

I just needed to vent, I don't think it's fair. The general blanket additude that any family with small children can't possibly be a good home for their particular pets is what really tees me off.


So where does that leave me? Either one of the following options:
1) Adopt a pet directly from a shelter, who's background with children isn't necessarily known...
2) Purchase an animal from a breeder or petshop, who may or may not have their hands clean in their beeding of the animal,
or
3) Wait a whole half of decade before acquiring a much wanted pet, by then, who knows how many animals may have been put to sleep that could have been a provided a loving home in our household??

I'm just so sick of it...
 

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alot of rescue organizations have rules like that to protect the pets and the children (but you already know that)

6 years does seem a bit extreme. Could you try other pet sources, are you totally stuck on a greyhound? Petfinder.com is a great resource and with so many shelters/ rescue organizations you could probably find one that was wiling to work with you. Request a home visit, let them know that you are serious and that you would do what it takes to make it work. Would you consider adopting an older dog that was out of his puppy stage?

I'm sorry, I know that some rescue groups can be a bit uncompromising about their policies but there are plenty out there who just want to find a good home and are willing to work with you.

Good luck
 

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That's too bad. I also understand where they're coming from but it seems a little rigid.

I just wanted to say that you should look around at different shelters. I got one of my dogs at a small no-kill shelter where they knew a lot about the dogs. They would say if the dogs were good with other animals, kids, where they liked to be scratched, etc. They also asked me a long list of questions before allowing me to take him with me. The dogs were a little more expensive ($70 vs. $55 at Animal Care & Control) but he's a wonderful dog worth every penny and more.

Good luck! I hope you find a nice dog.
 

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You are right, that does suck. I think it is unfair too.

I wanted to suggest one more option for you, though it may take a little while for you to find a dog this way (but not half a decade). How about letting your local vets office know that you are looking for a dog? And, putting the word out among your circle of friends/relatives? We did the later and ended up getting a fantastic dog from friends of friends. They were fostering her - she was the last of a litter of puppies that another friend of theirs had. She spent four months with this fantastic family that had small children. She was already used to children when we got her and already house trained. She is a wonderful dog! My 2 year old is great with her and loves her so much. I couldn't imagine life without her. We've had her for nine months now. We did have to work with 2 year old ds to teach him to be gentle with her (he still needs reminders), but overall, he has come a long, long way. Like you, I am a sahm and have the time to devote to child/pet interactions.
 

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I think some of those places are way over the top. We were interested in a retired grayhound at one point, but the flyer from them was enough to make me run screaming in the opposite direction. I went through homestudies to adopt my children and I'm sure not doing it to adopt a pet.

I second the idea of trying your local shelters. Where I am they are much less fanatic than many of the rescues.
 

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Heyla mama!

Some shelters will place dogs and cats with foster parents while the animal waits for adoption or receives necessary medical care. The foster parents would have an idea about the animal's temperment and possible suitability with children. I don't know if there are any shelters near you that do this, but it might be worth checking.

I know our local shelter doesn't place animals with college students or renters (without a letter from the landlord saying it's okay), and one shelter does house visits and wont place dogs with people who lack a certain sized yard for the dog to play in. I think the "no children under 6" rule probably has to do in part with the group's experience with families that include young children (perhaps a lack of time to care for the dog, or a breed/rescue background that doesn't do well with the excitement young children bring to a home...I know several retired greyhounds and they are lovely companions but VERY high need) as well as liability issues. A shelter could face prosecution if a dog injured a child (one reason some shelters will not adopt out "fighting dogs" like pit bulls and mastiffs).

I know it stinks for responsible pet owners/renters/people with small yards, but the rules are there to protect everyone...the dogs, the children, and the shelter...so it's really erring on the side of caution. Not that that makes it any easier!

Good luck finding a happy match for your family!
 

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So sorry you're having a tough time of it. Sounds pretty frustrating. Have you tried petfinder.com? They have listings by area of rescued animals, usually with designations regarding child compatibility. Some of the animals are from foster homes or from shelters, it just depends.

Also, with greyhounds it might be less that they think a home with small children can't provide a good home and more that they don't want to be liable if the dog has major issues that aren't compatible with small children. It sounds like you really already know a lot about them, but they sometimes have MAJOR issues with food and feeding and can attack anyone/anything that they view as trying to take it away. A small child who just wants to pet their dog while it happens to be eating can end up getting bitten pretty badly. Of course this isn't every greyhound, but just one more thing to consider. Sorry if you already knew!

Good luck in your search! I hope it works out. I would definitely check out petfinder.com or even craigslist for your area.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I am not quite ready for one yet, although I would LIKE one now, but I know that it would be better for us to wait just a bit to be extra doubly sure that we will be good and grounded. But I just decided to feel around now and start looking at my options for adoption, and I keep on and on running into that blanket rule. By the time we will be good and ready for one, our child still will not be 6 years old yet.

I had wanted a retired racing greyhound specifically because it would be older and not a puppy, and because of their docile temperaments. I would have been willing to be matched to one by the organization, so that we would get one that is the most suited for us. but I am willing to do more research on other breeds, although in my heart, I had fell in love with the greyhounds, I am willling to let my heart fall in love with any dog that is right for us, regardless of breed.

It is someone at petfinder.org that originally turned me on to retired greyhounds, given the age of my baby. But I am still in the process of researching, and just wanted to blow off a little steam at that rule...
 

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I would also check with your vet's office and talk to some rescue groups on an individual basis so they can tell you are knowledgeable about dogs and a responsible pet owner. I really do not like how some Rescue Groups are so rigid when a little flexibility on a case by case basis could result in a successful match. I want to adopt a bird but its worse than getting married to even be able to adopt one and I am a vet! I was always adopting animals (if I did not keep them myself) when I worked in a Clinic and I do think 6 years is excessive on the rescue groups, and within that there should be some room for negotiation.
 

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i agree with checking with your vet's office. or, try petfinder.com. that's where we found our yellow lab. the black one we got from the Humane Society. i think the rule stinks and that you'll probably have better luck with a priviate rescue group. good luck mama! my life would be empty without my dogs so i know how you feel!
 

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That is sad, I had a dog growing up and we have a Lab who is wonderful with our son. Maybe do some checking around, it seems somebody always knows somebody with puppies or something, especially out in the country.
 

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Having seen enough monstrous six-year-olds, I do understand where they're coming from. They don't know, after all, that *your* six-year-old won't be like that (nor your two year old!). But yes, it does limit your options to luck of the draw from a shelter or purchasing a very expensive purebred. You'd be providing a good home for those pets too, though!
 

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I can recall MANY posts right here in this forum where a toddler does something inappropriate (or unknown b/c nobody witnessed it) to a family pet -- the family pet defends himself with a snap and a growl and a nip -- and then the animal gets put down.

Nobody bothers to TEACH the child OR the animal how to interact with one another. IT TAKES WORK.

It does suck that a responsible family may not get a pet, but I understand where they are coming from after hearing so many anecdotes here.
 

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Please don't buy a dog from a pet store, they all come from puppy mills, even the ones that claim to buy from breeders.

In terms of buying from a breeder I think it is pretty easy to tell if a breeder is legit or a puppy mill. The main problem there would be expense I think.
 

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That rule sucks, doesn't it? I ended up getting one of my dogs directly from the shelter and one from a breeder because my kids are under 6. They've been taught not to hurt the pets and on the off chance that one of them does, the dogs aren't big enough to do any damage. I have a Pomeranian and a small Beagle mix--their barks are definitely much worse than their bites.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by LolaK
Please don't buy a dog from a pet store, they all come from puppy mills, even the ones that claim to buy from breeders.

In terms of buying from a breeder I think it is pretty easy to tell if a breeder is legit or a puppy mill. The main problem there would be expense I think.
I don't think all pet stores sell from mills - the PetSmart around us only "sells" animals that they have saved from kill shelters. Might be worth checking around.

Also, we were recently looking into getting a puppy from a breeder - they interviewed us as much as we did them. Reputable breeders want to be sure that the dogs go to a good home; most of them are pretty attached to the pups!

But I would say, don't give up - there have been great suggestions. Not sure if anyone said, but check with greyhound breeders, too. Most breeders are excellent sources of information and sometimes they get dogs back for some reason or another.
 

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i adopted a 7 year old spaniel/pug mix she was so good with the kids 9 months and 2 until my dd 2 started playing too rough poking the dogs eyes and standing on her head, finally the dog snapped and bit her on the nose
we had her for 1 week and had to get rid of her, not many dogs would put up with that abuse tho, and of course i dont blame my toddler, she was just curious
i guess it depends on the kids tho...
 

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Definitely don't buy from a pricey pet store--all puppy mill dogs.

If you're not set on a greyhound, you might try other breed rescue organizations. We have a schnauzer, and the rescue organization in our area specifically screens the pets to see which ones are okay with little kids, older kids, and other pets, and then places them accordingly. A retriever or a lab might be very good choices with you.

Racing greyhounds have often had very stressful (or even abusive) pasts, so I can understand the rule in that case--these are probably not the best dogs to place with toddlers.
 

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Not trying to bash retired greyhounds, but does the place you are looking to adopt from teach the animal all about what they might be facing? I know some of the stuff these animals have to learn...steps, carpet, linoleoum (sp), those kinds of things. Throwing kids into the mix somtimes is a receipe for disaster. I have seen firsthand some bad things happen with sighthounds. (I know, not necessarily in your case.) I would check with some rescues...have you thought about a German Shepherd Dog? From lots of past exp., I know that even rescued dogs can be so awesome with kids! Just so you know, not all breeders are terrible people. You just have to do some research. Just to give you an example, I am in love with Irish Wolfhounds. I did some research on some breeders, and sent emails to about 8 breeders that looked like they knew what they were doing (OFA, certain diseases that run in the breed, and conformation championships). Out of the 8 emails I sent out, I received a return email from a lady in Texas, just thrilled that I would be watching her kennels over the next 5 years or so to see what her dogs would do. She even went so far as to send me a video and color brochure about all her dogs. Just for all that, I probably will be buying a pup from her, and I would have to drive all the way from WI to TX to get one. Sometimes it's just worth it. (Don't get me wrong...I have rehabbed GSD's before, and love that as well.) Sorry if I got on a soap box......
 
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