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I have always done 3 sets of 9-12.

Recently I read this is = to water torture for the muscles.
In an magazine article I read that you should do ONE set of the heaviest weight you can ,muster, then move on to another muscle group.

What do you think? I feel like a slacker doing it this way, b/c I'm so udes to the 3 set routine.
WDYT??
 

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Go to this site: http://www.stumptuous.com/cms/index.php It has a lot of great info on appropriate sets/reps for your level (ie beginner, intermediate, advanced), periodization, developing a training schedule, etc. The woman who put the site together does immaculate research and I would trust her over some random magazine article (unless that article cited several recently published peer-reviewed studies).

FWIW, I am just getting back into weight training after having a baby, and next week I get to go back to the intermediate routines, where depending on the exercise I would do anywhere from 3 sets of 10 to 5 sets of 3 - the latter being for hardcore squats.
 

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First thing to always remember when reading fitness articles, is that anyone is allowed to write one. So be careful who you listen to. How many sets, reps, order of exercise, weights used, rest periods, etc. All depend on you and your goals. I say for the average exerciser, that three sets is unnecessary and you should be able to receive the same benefits from two sets that you would from three. I know that the ACSM also recommends two sets, but I'm too tired to go dig up a link right now. Beginners should always start with one set and work their way to two.

Again though, it all depends. Are you supersetting? Doing a periodized workout plan? Are you seeing improvements as time goes on (are your weights getting heavier)? With out knowing all that stuff. My best guess is that if you are sucessfully completing three sets of 9-12 (with out wanting to drop the weights and die before you finish the set). Then you need to either up the amount of weight your using, correct your form, try some new exercises, or all of the above.
 

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Wow, I love this site!! Down-to-earth, and definitely not full of bull poo.

Quote:

Originally Posted by spughy
Go to this site: http://www.stumptuous.com/cms/index.php It has a lot of great info on appropriate sets/reps for your level (ie beginner, intermediate, advanced), periodization, developing a training schedule, etc. The woman who put the site together does immaculate research and I would trust her over some random magazine article (unless that article cited several recently published peer-reviewed studies).

FWIW, I am just getting back into weight training after having a baby, and next week I get to go back to the intermediate routines, where depending on the exercise I would do anywhere from 3 sets of 10 to 5 sets of 3 - the latter being for hardcore squats.
 

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When I was weight training seriously (okay, seriously for me, I know some people are body builders - I was really into it though, I weight trained 6 days a week) - I did three sets of 12 reps. I had to work up to it though. I worked with a personal trainer to learn how to properly use the equipment - I was doing circuit weights. I learned a very cool thing from him. He had me doing slow reps - wow, did that kick my butt. They were slow but consistent - the same speed up - the same speed down. Honestly, I had to work up from two sets of 8 reps, and those were tough. I saw a tremendous difference though in the way I looked and felt. It was awesome. So, if you've stopped seeing results - I would suggest paying attention to how you're doing each rep - slow it down and pay attention to your form. See if it makes a difference in your workout.
 

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Yes, don't go too fast. It's good to vary things. One technique that I use with my clients is to have them lift for one count, then lower for three counts. Then lift for two counts, and lower for two counts, then lift for three counts and lower on one count (does this make sense?) I switch it every three lifts. But if that's too complicated to do on your own, you could just switch it every work out, or switch every week or something. Make sure to breath properly!
 
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