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Ok- a little backstory. I've posted very briefly about it before, but my DH and I had to rehome our dog Otis, a ridgeback, because he was a way wrong fit for our situation, and vice versa. We were doing a good long walk a day with him and also taking him to the dog park for a few hours once or twice a week. Unfortunately, Otis required more like 7-8 hours of exercise a day before he could be calm indoors. AND he NEEDED the company of at least one other dog, which we could not provide. He was also bored with how calm our house is, not enough action for him. So, we found him a better situation and he's totally blissed out now as one of three dogs with a new family.<br><br>
With that being said, I am miserable without a dog in the house. As unhappy as Otis was, he was still a great dog and I miss him dearly. We have a condo, big enough to be comfortable for a dog that's calm indoors. I love to go on walks, which is good because we don't have a fenced in yard, though we do have a yard. I was tossing around the idea of adopting a senior dog once my baby is born (september, yay!) and everything calms down a little. Anyway, since we have a quieter lifestyle and have several great comfy places for a tired dog to lay, I was wondering if anyone has any experience with adopting dogs maybe 5-7+ years old? I was looking at maybe a retired racing greyhound, they seem pretty couch potato-ish as they age, aside from their once daily spurt of energy of course. We're not really small dog people so we would be looking at a little bit of an bigger, or at least medium sized, dog.<br><br>
A few things I'm wondering about. How realistic is it that I'll be able to keep my baby from pestering the dog once he/she is mobile? I know some dogs get irritated with little hands poking and pulling. This is my first baby so new territory for me. I don't care if the dog doesn't want to engage in play with the child...it would really be more my companion than anything. Do older dogs ever adjust to the new surroundings completely?<br><br>
Anyway, it's just an idea I was tossing around. I'd love any input you lovely folks might have. Thanks!
 

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Didn't someone on here babysit a greyhound and it broke it's leg just getting out of the car unassisted?? If I'm remembering correctly, and knowing nothing else about the breed I seriously doubt you want a greyhound and a baby.<br><br>
I doubt you have to get a "senior" dog but an adult that you could get an idea of his personality seems like a good idea. Also I don't think you could do a baby human and baby dog at the same time, they both have such high needs, so that's another reason to get an adult dog.
 

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That was an ITALIAN greyhound. Very different.<br><br>
Retired greyhounds tend to be wonderful dogs. Definitely talk to one or more adoption agencies about you and your situation (baby on the way) and see what they say. I tend to recommend against buying or adopting a puppy or a young dog (under age 2ish) when you're going to have a baby yourself, and until that baby is older and able to be told "no." However, an adult dog who is kid-savvy can be a wonderful fit. So I would call a couple of agencies and talk to them.
 

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I have adopted a couple of seniors and it has been very rewarding.<br><br>
The first one is Old Dog, who is so close to death it is palpable. Let me give some backstory though: we adopted him at 8 years old from the HS. He came with a tearstained letter and his puppy blanket. The workers were afraid he'd die if he spent another night in the shelter as he was grieving hard for his owner (who was dying of cancer, hence the HS). He was fine with our devil cat and we took him home immediately. He's never been a behavioral problem and has been a prince of dogs. Our neighbors said something to the effect of "oh that's so nice you adopted a senior, maybe you'll have a couple of years with him". Now they say every spring, "Is that still him? Man, I thought he would have passed by now!" He's old and failing fast, but I'm finding it hard to do the right thing by him because I can't imagine my house without him. That's pathetic and something I'd lambaste someone else for, but he's been my companion for nearly all of my adult life!<br><br>
We also adopted a senior boxer at 6 years old. Her owner was a collector and needed to downsize. She had no training and no socialization, but her heart was jumbo-sized with love for people and animals. She also never gave us a problem behaviorally other than jumping up in greeting, and she loved my son more than any other pack member. I'm still grieving and it's been 7 months since she sickened and we euthanized her; my son asks about her every day despite his young age. She was one of the best dogs I've ever known.<br><br>
If you are interested in a senior, you will find them rewarding. They might need more vet care (mine all needed dentals and extensive mouth work due to previous owners) and better food, but they are already house-trained, leash-trained (hopefully!) and socialized. My dogs fit right into our pack without a problem and were accepted and interested in our lifestyle. Old Dog is a bit eccentric (can we say senile) in the last two years, but he's like 115 in human years, so we cut him some slack. If you want an older dog, rescues will work with you too.
 
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