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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What I mean by "extras" is sports, band, choir, clubs, school plays, dances, field trips, talent shows, and the like. My kids will miss those things if I keep them at home. Then again there are a lot of things in schools that I want my kids to miss. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> I don't know how important that really is. I mean, sometimes it seems really important and then sometimes it doesn't. What is your opinion? Also, I am a very academic person. Not school wise, but I mean wanting to learn new things and challenging myself and just liking to be informed and intelligent. If my children are like this, and self motivated to learn, then I don't see a problem homeschooling. But if they aren't then isn't it doing them a disservice not to place them in an academic environment to try to help them acquire a love for learning. Once again my own brain contradicts itself by saying that school never made me have a love for learning, if anything it lessened it. I am confused. Help please. I need some little angels and devils on my shoulders. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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MOST of those types of activities have a version in homeschool circles.<br><br>
Sports- easy to find<br>
band/choir/orchestra- find a community group<br>
plays- community theater<br>
field trips- how about once a week? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
etc<br><br>
-Angela
 

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Ds's life is mostly extras <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
He's taken drama class at children's theatre school, done field trips of factories and museums with our provincial hsing group. He plays football through the community club league, has studied jujitsu at a martial arts school, kung fu, gymnastics and swimming through the Y, art through the city art gallery and a local art drop in centre called <a href="http://artcityinc.com/" target="_blank">Art City</a><br><br>
He wants to study kendo, and will start in September (they only enroll students once a year), may play baseball this summer, again through community club leagues. He's played mini-soccer, taken boxing and wrestling classes, learned to develop film, throw pottery, make moccasins and <a href="http://images.google.ca/images?q=porcupine+quillwork&ie=UTF-8&oe=utf-8&rls=org.mozilla:en-US:eek:fficial&client=firefox-a&um=1&sa=N&tab=wi" target="_blank">porcupine quillwork</a> (nothing that nice, though, but it was fun to learn, and a dying art.)<br><br>
He's spent days searching for turtles on the river bank, and days spent in the library researching projects he's created for himself. He's not at all traditionally academic in any way (and I am), but he's spent many days immersed in biology textbooks reading about dinosaurs or bugs, from kids picture books to advanced college level stuff that he didn't fully understand but ploughed through anyway because he was interested in the subject.<br><br>
He's 14 now and has spent much of the last 2 years reading manga, watching anime and playing video games, much to my chagrin, but I've discovered now that he can understand basic japanese, and is teaching me about japanese culture, language, history, literature and mythology, and is writing a manga story (though he won't show it to me, or tell me anything about it.) This summer he hopes to take an intro japanese language class at the Japanese Cultural centre, if he has time for it between football season, baseball and his part time job. He also belongs to a an anime club that meets once a week to watch anime and hang out.<br><br>
Oh, he just put a deposit down on a bass and has decided to teach himself.<br><br>
So, extras, I think we have covered <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alegna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10712982"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">MOST of those types of activities have a version in homeschool circles.<br><br>
Sports- easy to find<br>
band/choir/orchestra- find a community group<br>
plays- community theater<br>
field trips- how about once a week? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"><br><br>
etc<br><br>
-Angela</div>
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After our first year of hsing I had to vow to only sign up for half the field trips that looked interesting to us, we were waaaay overwhelmed with all the stuff I signed up for <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

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I don't think one needs a public school to fill those needs. What a public school does is offer some activities, at no cost, in one place. That can be very convienent.<br><br>
That said, we've used public school to fill my teen dd's need for cross country running and have been quite pleased with the folks who facilitate the program. (In our area hsers can participate in school activities). They've been welcoming and accepting. It's also nice to not have to travel far for something we desire. Two minutes down the road, and we are there. Niiice.<br><br>
We've also been blown away by the local music and theater preformances of our local high school. (This is not something my hsers have participated in-- but we've so enjoyed the local performances, and athletics. The kids in town are very talented!).
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I am feeling better already. Thanks!
 

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Most public schools don't offer a lot of those "extras" any more. Either due to cost reductions or standardized test prep, there's not much going on there. Field trips especially, my dss in middle school maybe gets 2-3 the whole year. I only remember doing one school play in all the years of public school.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>cloudswinger</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713306"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Most public schools don't offer a lot of those "extras" any more. Either due to cost reductions or standardized test prep, there's not much going on there. Field trips especially, my dss in middle school maybe gets 2-3 the whole year. I only remember doing one school play in all the years of public school.</div>
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I hate how wildly this varies in the US. Our local high school has multiple preformances of all kinds all year long. Music, theater, comedy club acts, choral performances, jazz & rock music, multiple sports programs, art exhibits etc. Our town allows hsers to participate in all of these activities as well. Not all hsers care to partake but those who do are welcomed.
 

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Your not going to have any problem finding activities for your children. In fact, there are so many you can feel overwhelmed! LOL<br><br>
My oldest takes tae kwon do and my youngest takes ballet on a regular basis. Once sport each is enough for me and them. Summer they do swimming lessons.<br><br>
Field trips we take every week! Zoo, science museum, art museum, etc. Most of the places also have inexpensive classes for home schoolers as well which is nice.<br><br>
We are not even involved in a home schooling group. The groups offer even more activities such as prom for juniors and seniors, classes, choir, band, etc. etc. etc.<br><br>
Many public schools let home schooled children participate as well in art, music, sports, etc.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>marilynmama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713561"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Many public schools let home schooled children participate as well in art, music, sports, etc.</div>
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Here they can not legally keep you out of PS extracurriculars. We pay property taxes to support the school system whether we HS or not, so we have a right to take advantage of the programs.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sk8ermaiden</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713651"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Here they can not legally keep you out of PS extracurriculars. We pay property taxes to support the school system whether we HS or not, so we have a right to take advantage of the programs.</div>
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Ummmm yes they can. Homeschoolers in TX are seen as the same as private school students and as such are not eligible for activities through the schools.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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I just wanted to add that none of the stuff I listed above was done through our ps system.<br><br>
Schools here have, to some extent, the choice to let hsers participate in their activities, but there is very little that ds or I would ever be interested in. Schools here don't often have much in the way of extras, usually it's one really interested and committed teacher who will facilitate the extra-curricular, and when they leave, the program ends. (Just as an aside, I went to a Metis school, and taxidermy was an option in grade 9 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/grossedout.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="gross">)<br><br>
There is just so much easily available in my community, it's never really occurred to me to even try to use school extra-curriculars. Ds did want to play football through the schools, but wasn't allowed, not because of the school or school board, but because of the athletic association rules <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/angry.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="angry">
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>alegna</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713698"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Ummmm yes they can. Homeschoolers in TX are seen as the same as private school students and as such are not eligible for activities through the schools.<br><br>
-Angela</div>
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That is odd, my mom who is a public school teacher here told me this. Maybe it is just her district - or maybe she is misinformed.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sk8ermaiden</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713876"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">That is odd, my mom who is a public school teacher here told me this. Maybe it is just her district - or maybe she is misinformed.</div>
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She's misinformed. Though I suppose it's possible there is a district out there that allows it. This is very clear-cut in TX. Many states it is allowed (or even MANDATED) that public schools make those options open to homeschoolers.<br><br>
But not here. I've never heard of it happening at all in TX. And I'm fairly certain that UIL specifically forbids it.<br><br>
-Angela
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Sk8ermaiden</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713876"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">That is odd, my mom who is a public school teacher here told me this. Maybe it is just her district - or maybe she is misinformed.</div>
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In my area, it varies by district. Hsers in my town are not restricted at all. I hope that doesn't change, as my dd has been very blessed with a good coach and wonderful teammates. There are only a few hsers who participate in these activites, but all have reported (that I know of) respectful experiences.
 

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I agree with the PPs that you won't have any trouble finding extras for your kids. In that respect my children live a far richer life than their ps counterparts.<br>
And if your kids want something and are motivated, there's often a way to put it together for them (someteims at little or no cost) by networking with the homeschool group.<br>
Sports, music, drama, art lessons, all these things are often quite easily found in the community and your local homeschool group can help you plug into that.<br><br>
As for an academic environment, your kids will follow your lead (although perhaps not your interests). If you model a love of learning, create a rich and interesting family life, and set that sort of tone in your home, I don't doubt your kids will follow that path - probably more easily than in school where learning can often become a chore rather than a joy.<br><br>
Good luck!<br>
Karen
 

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We've not missed out on any of those things by being homeschoolers. In fact, it would be harder if they were in school! We live in a very tiny, low-income town about 25 miles away from a major university. In our town, where they would actually attend school, there is no choir, no orchestra, etc. It's also ultra-conservative and very religious (not that those are either here nor there, just that we're not either of the two).<br><br>
Instead we spend our time in the university town. My daughter takes violin lessons from a homeschooling mother, my son takes guitar lessons from the guitar shop. They've taken art classes at the creative arts school, dd took basketball through a local gym, and my oldest and youngest are in a dance program through a wonderful liberal arts dance school.<br><br>
Where the local school doesn't introduce foreign languages until high school, my kids are in a Russian class once a week that would be unavailable to them outside of regular school hours.<br><br>
For *us* it would <i>limit</i> their opportunities to put them into school.
 

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I agree with the pp that a lot of schools are cutting out those extras more than you might imagine. The highschool that I started out at had a wonderful arts program, which meant so much to me (I was big into acting and also painting) but then the highschool that I moved to (in a different part of the province) had no drama program whatsoever, and a few years after I went there they cut out all visual arts, which I find just flooring. I believe I heard that the same school is now going to cut out their music program. They also have few sports teams at that school.<br><br>
Schools are looking for ways to deal with funding cuts, and the extras are where they are going to make cuts.<br><br>
Oh, field trips--of course this will vary from school to school, but for the 4 years my daughter was in school she didn't have any very impressive field trips. They were all things that we would do with her anyway, like go for a walk to see the autumn leaves, go apple picking, etc. Again, I think this is a funding issue.<br><br>
It's quite true what everyone has said about so many activities being available in the community--but I would like to add to that, that all that does cost money. My husband can't find work lately so our money is so very tight, and all I could afford for my daughter this year is one art class. I wish I could put her in other things, especially music lessons, but there is just no money for it. But if money isn't a problem for you, then the sky is the limit. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Cost is a big factor. There is a teen theater program about 40 minutes away, but it's $600/semester. The high school drama program is free. My dd does cross country and there are no town cross country running teams, but she could do travel soccer for $200/season, but she doesn't like to play anymore. We've also paid up to $300/session for art classes at a local uni, which were fab. But the high school won't charge us.<br><br>
I think this crazy stuff varies wildly by area. You might have good people at the local schools who welcome your kids, and you might have a school system that offers nothing or offers everything but isn't open to homeschoolers. Maybe there are lots of free extras in your town for kids, or maybe they are costly.<br><br>
I haven't found it to be very clear cut, so we try to stay open and look for things that are affordable and where the people are respectful. It's not always a simple thing to find what kids need, ime. School or home...we just do the best we can and drive and spend if we have to/can afford it.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>UUMom</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10713402"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Our local high school has multiple preformances of all kinds all year long. Music, theater, comedy club acts, choral performances, jazz & rock music, multiple sports programs, art exhibits etc. Our town allows hsers to participate in all of these activities as well. Not all hsers care to partake but those who do are welcomed.</div>
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that's awesome!! i wish my town was so warm and fuzzy to hschoolers!!! lol. i would totally take them up on it!!!!
 
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