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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My 8 year old is still reversing letters and numbers. She'll be starting 3rd grade in the fall. Since 1st grade she has had alot of early intervention, reading recovery, Early Intervention Reading, etc. We gave the school the go ahead this year to test her to start trying to figure out what is going on. They did a series of tests, her IQ was very close to her achievement score, which may rule out any learning disability. Her scores were within the normal range with math a little on the low side. The next step was to get her evaluated by her ped/dr and explore ADD, since all the testing she did so well on was 1:1 w/ the counselor.<br>
The school won't start talking dyslexia until next year if she is still reversing. We are concerned though. She reverses numbers as well as letters, 7, 3, 9 mostly but will even answer a math problem 51, when the answer is 15. Her b's, d's and p's are still almost always reversed and will sometimes read on for no and will stumble over simple kindergarten wall words like If. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br>
I'm thinking of having her evaluated over the summer, but have no idea where to turn for this. Any help would really be appreciated. TY!
 

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You might look for an independent learning center or developmental specialist to evaluate her. In my state there is a facility called the Stern Center, but I'm sure there must be an equivalent in many states.Ask around or look in the yelllow pages. I don't know the official timeframe that dyslexia can be officially diagnosed. If you don't get your answer here cross post it in Special Needs parenting, ok.?
 

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Our district has a parent advocate who can help with setting up testing, navigating the school system, etc. You may want to check with the district to see if they have anything like that. Our advocate tells me (we had some problems this year, although of a different sort) that if you use the wording in the laws for special education, they are likely to pay more attention.<br><br>
She advises parents to write a letter to the school using the phrase my child is not "getting a reasonable benefit out of the regular classroom" and I would like her tested for ________. If the school refuses to test your child & you wind up doing it on your own, paying for it & your tester finds a problem, the school is required to reimburse you the cost of the testing. At least this is the case in my state.<br><br>
This website: <a href="http://www.dyslexiaa2z.com/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.dyslexiaa2z.com/index.htm</a> might have some good info for you in trying to determine if you should pursue testing for dyslexia. I'd agree that, if that really is the problem, the sooner it is identified, the better for your dd's self esteem.
 

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If she has learned cursive writing already and is still reversing letters, then there is a problem.<br><br>
I am a third grade teacher, and when I teach cursive usually that cures the reversals.<br><br>
This year, I had three students for whom this did not happen.<br><br>
I have recommended testing. I hope the parents follow through.
 

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I am a special ed teacher. I would test at the end of second grade/beginning of third. By then it is not developmentally expected that a child would still have reversals. If the district won't do it until third - this is so frustrating, because what will happen is that they will hem and haw and eventually get around to testing sometime next year, and then who knows when any services will begin, as your daughter falls behind - I would look for an independent evaluation service.<br><br>
If there is a children's hospital near you, look there, otherwise a child psychologist should be able to do testing. Make sure you go to a good one. Some subtler forms of LD's don't show up when you do basic testing (your daughter may already have learned some ways of compensating for her disability, therefore doing better than expected on achievement tests), but when you delve deeper, there it is.<br><br>
Best,<br>
Leatherette
 

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Follow your gut! If you are concerned, have her tested. I tend to feel that is mommy senses an issues, there tends to actaully be an issue. Mother knows best. If she she does have an issue with it, it is better to know now rather than later... and if there isn't, then you can put your mind at ease. The best of luck to you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks for the replies. She has not yet learned cursive.<br>
We saw a pediatrician today who thinks she is ADD. She does well on her spelling tests but cannot retain what she has learned, and will screw up the same word she just worked on for weeks <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br>
I'm looking now into a private evaluation. Thanks again!
 

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I just want to add to this thread that I did recommend testing to ten of my thirty-two students .... I do not really think all of them are ADD, but I just want to be very sure, because as a professional, I want to let parent know what I see and to be sure to address any problem as soon as it comes up...<br><br>
I know, it sounds like some Medical Doctor who hears galloping and thinks of zebras, but I have to err on the side of caution in this litigious society...
 
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