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I'm not planning another child anytime soon, but this is a concern and would a a huge part of my decision to have another child.<br><br>
With my twins I began showing signs of pre-eclampsia at 28 weeks. We kept it under control until 32 weeks, when I was admitted to hospital bedrest. After 4 days, my lab work came back with elevated liver enzymes and low platelets, classic signs of HELLP syndrome.<br><br>
My twins were born at 33 weeks, in the NICU for 4 weeks, and had some problems after they came home, though they're all resolved now.<br><br>
How likely is this to happen again? What about if I only had a singleton?<br><br>
I've been pregnant with twins that I lost, before these two, so obviously my body tends to release more than one egg at a time. I do have to worry about the possibility of twins again.
 

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If you haven't already, check out the Preeclampsia Foundation's forums. There is good data on recurrence and also women who have had similar experiences with whom you can commiserate.<br><br>
{{HUGS}}
 

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I was told it's not likely to happen again and mostly occurs in my case, 1st time pregnancy. I had a trace of protein on my due date so I was induced. For someone in good health that follows a good diet and exercises, I was told the chances are slim for my next. I'm not a professional so I could be wrong but I have been told this by numerous midwives and my OB. I however did not have twins and I don't know if that matters or not. I will read the Preeclampsia Foundation's forum though. See the<br><a href="http://blueribbonbaby.org/" target="_blank">Brewer Diet</a> HTH . good luck to you.
 

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I had preeclampsia and was induced too so also wondered about this if there is a next time. Haven't checked out the above resources yet but I did read something interesting in the book The Baby Bond the website is I believe <a href="http://www.thebabybond.com" target="_blank">www.thebabybond.com</a> that said that preeclampsia increases 25% for each serving of dairy. I ate tons of dairy as a vegetarian in pregnancy to get enough protein and calcium and it lead to increased weight gain too. Didn't check out her source on that but have read other issues with dairy in the china study too so if I get pregnant again I'll be skipping dairy.<br>
All the best to you and your twins. I also started out with twins and lost one during pregnancy.
 

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This thread is kinda old and dusty, but I wanted to chime in. Before you decide to get pregnant, talk to your doctor about having some testing done to determine whether there were any underlying issues that contributed to your pre-e. For example an issue with clotting factors could contribute to pre-e and can be helped with injections of heparin or other drugs. My doctor uncovered a clotting issue and I'll probably get shots of Lovenox during my next pregnancy.<br><br>
You should also get a referral for an MFM (maternal-fetal medicine specialist). They will give you some great advice on whether this is likely to happen again. My care team consists of an MFM, an OB, and a midwife. I'm planning on getting pregnant in a year or two and having this kind of support really makes me feel positive about my outcomes for my next baby.<br><br>
And really, really research the Brewer Diet. The folks at the Preeclampsia Foundation reject the claims of the Brewer Diet (also called Blue Ribbon Baby) and as someone with a background in biology, I tend to agree. Pre-e is not a dietary issue, it's a placenta issue that begins very early in the pregnancy. You can't eat your way into or out of pre-e. I, personally, would not adopt the Brewer guidelines for my next pregnancy.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>sparklett</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15577110"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">And really, really research the Brewer Diet. The folks at the Preeclampsia Foundation reject the claims of the Brewer Diet (also called Blue Ribbon Baby) and as someone with a background in biology, I tend to agree. Pre-e is not a dietary issue, it's a placenta issue that begins very early in the pregnancy. You can't eat your way into or out of pre-e. I, personally, would not adopt the Brewer guidelines for my next pregnancy.</div>
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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that"><br><br>
It is definitely possible to have pre-e and/or HELLP recur in subsequent pregnancies. In general the earlier and more severe your pre-e/HELLP, the more likely it is to recur, but there are always exceptions.<br><br>
And it seems as though there is no consensus on recurrence rates, simply because it is so dependent on time of onset, severity, family history, preexisting conditions, etc. I had severe pre-e and delivered my son at 32 weeks, and was quoted a 15% chance of recurrence by one MFM; another quoted me 60-90%.<br><br>
In my case it was 100%, because I developed it at 29 weeks in my second pregnancy but made it to 34 weeks before delivery.<br><br>
That said, not many women experience HELLP in more than one pregnancy, but it can happen. Multiples are a risk factor for hypertensive disorders of pregnancy.<br><br>
I definitely agree with the recommendation to see a Maternal-Fetal Medicine specialist before TTC again, and getting tested for underlying conditions such as clotting disorders, which are associated with increased risk of pre-e.<br><br>
And I also echo the recommendation to visit the Preeclampsia Foundation forums if you haven't already!
 
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