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So I left one thermos-ful of raw milk out at room temperature for several days. Today I opened it up to have a look, and scraped 1/4c of sour cream off the top to use in cornbread. The rest of the milk was obviously not cream, but thick and sort of curdy (clabber?). It's currently draining through a cloth in a sieve.<br><br>
Assuming it forms a vaguely cheesey substance... what will it be? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> I haven't added yoghurt or rennet or anything to it, it's just milk. So what's the soured drained solid milk stuff officially called? Creme fraiche? Cottage cheese? And the soured wheyish stuff - is it whey, or buttermilk, or...?<br><br>
Oh, and what do I do with 'em? <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> I was all excited to culture milk and forgot to actually think of a use for the products! I assume I can use the whey-stuff as the liquid in bread, and use the curd-stuff in a dip or as a spread?
 

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Truly, I was afraid to open this post. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"><br><br>
Good question. I am not sure but thought I'd give you a bump.
 

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I'm not sure, actually, that this is the right answer because I have never personally done what you did :LOL. But, my step-dad was telling me that his mom used to make cottage cheese by leaving a jar of milk out on the counter for a few days. Turns out, his mom did a ton of TF stuff and he is a great resource for me! Anyway, maybe it's cottage cheese?
 

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I'm pretty sure it's just called clabbered milk. When you separate the whey from the curds, you can mix the curds with some spices or herbs and call it yogurt cheese. The liquid leftover is cultured whey. This is a very traditional way to make cottage cheese. It tastes a little too fermented for my taste though. I typically cook with the whey or use it to soak grains, and don't really do anything with the curds. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<a href="http://www.westonaprice.org/Learning-to-Maximize-the-Use-of-Your-Real-Milk-and-Cream.html" target="_blank">http://www.westonaprice.org/Learning...and-Cream.html</a><br><br>
Scroll down for these yummy ideas;<br><i>Make homemade <span style="text-decoration:underline;">whey and cream cheese</span> with the soured milk.<br><br>
Try blending the cream cheese with a few strawberries and maple syrup for a delicious spread for sprouted bagels.<br>
Soak organic pancake mix overnight in soured milk.<br>
Use soured milk or cream to make scrambled eggs.<br>
Use soured milk to make custard pudding or creme brulée.<br>
Use soured cream on a baked potato or spread on a sandwich instead of mayonnaise.<br>
Mix a tablespoon of soured cream in a bowl of soup to liven it up and make it digestible.<br>
Use soured milk instead of whey to soak oatmeal overnight.<br>
Mix carob powder and a little rapadura into slightly soured milk and give to your kids as "chocolate milk"<br>
Use soured cream to make sweet potato casserole.<br>
Use soured cream to make meatloaf.<br>
Warm slightly soured milk on the stove with some cocoa powder and Rapadura to make fabulous hot chocolate.<br>
Make traditional British whitesauce with soured milk.</i>
 

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I don't care for soured milk products myself. Adding a culture makes such a difference to the flavor. That's my pick.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Gale Force</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/15427131"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I don't care for soured milk products myself. Adding a culture makes such a difference to the flavor. That's my pick.</div>
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Same here. I'd strain what you have and try to flavor it for some sort of spreadable cheese. Not my favorite thing but I know a few people who routinely make a spreadable cheese that way.
 

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I vastly prefer dairy that's cultured with something, but I have used my clabbered milk before in other things. I drain off all the whey until I'm left with a small amount of "cream cheese" that I add sea salt, garlic powder, chili powder, etc. Sometimes I do half savory, and half with honey. Mostly as dips to take for the kids for lunches.<br>
The whey I used to use for soaking grains, but as I'm not doing grains any more, I don't really do this so much any more.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
The curds are actually pretty yummy. DH tasted them and said "Huh, it's got a lot of flavours". <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue"> They're still straining - currently it's almost the same consistency as yoghurt cheese I made once. I added salt to a bit of the mixture and spread it on bread - yummy! Not sure what I'll do with the rest - maybe make it into a dip, maybe stir it into soups or cut cubes of it into scrambled eggs as I'd do with cream cheese.<br><br>
I just made bread dough with the whey, too. AND had a small half-glass of kefir mixed with a touch of honey at breakfast (not really a fan, but DD loved it!), AND I have sourdough starter going on the bench, AND a pot of sauerkraut fermenting away. So I feel pretty virtuous about TF today. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> If I can just make up that water kefir before the grains die, and feed the sourdough before <i>it</i> dies, I'll be doing pretty well.
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lurk.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lurk">
 

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It's clabber. Just use it like you'd use kefir or yogurt.
 
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