Mothering Forum banner

1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,303 Posts
Well, the short answer is, it depends. It depends on the preschool/ day care, but yes, almost all preschool teachers have training in early childhood development and milestones a child should meet when. The amount of education a teache has received varies, but at the very least most teachers have had a few courses and experiences with many, many children of the same age. They do also have checklists of milestones and such. I agree with the teacher; if he is not responding to his name, that is concerning, especially if his hearing has been checked. I doubt it is related to mental health. I would start with a pediatrician.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
10,793 Posts
I agree with what Jessica said.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,179 Posts
well, any individual teacher has seen dozens or hundreds or thousands of other kids day in and day out. So depending on the teacher, I may take it VERY seriously.<br><br>
In fact I have vagueconcerns about my 2 year old and I just don't know what's normal. I'm not rushing her to the Dr, instead I'm hunting for a well-established preschool where I can get her observed by somebody attentive and loving who's see hundreds of healthy kids her age. you know?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,467 Posts
It depends. DD preschool teacher has been nothing less than amazing be interviewed others that just didn't get it though. Were blessed and thankful to have her in our DD life.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
Pre-school teachers have lots of experience with toddlers and young children. Most milestones are based on what most "typical" children can do by a certain age. Teachers have a room full of children to compare each one to. This, plus some courses in early childhood education can make even the newer of teacher a pretty good gauge of how a child is doing. Alot of pre-school teachers also do conduct formal and informal assessments that can quickly show you what is expected of a child by a certain age. Many children get referred for evals soon after entering pre-k because the teachers noticed delays that parents (due to not knowing "what's normal") did not recognize as a red flag.<br>
Every child is different, but I would be concered about a 3.5 year old with only a few words that does not answer to his name. Please encourage your friend to look into having him evaluated.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,290 Posts
Lack of words and not respondign to name is a big red flag for autism.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
416 Posts
Our pre-school is accredited which requires the teachers to attend continuing education. They take classes in developmental disorders, delays, etc. Our son's 2 year pre-school teacher helped us first identify early red flags for ADHD. We were so thankful to catch it early (ironically, his father had just been diagnosed the month before they brought it up with us) and have been treating it with supplements and diet mods successfully ever since.<br><br>
That said, his 3 yr. teacher (at the same school) was CLUELESS! I think she is the exception at our school more than the rule, but it was very disappointing.<br><br>
I would definitely at least look into what the teacher is saying. IMO it helps so much to start helping kids out early!
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,445 Posts
So, are they doing anything for the speech delay? They don't have to investigate autism if they don't want to, but I feel very strongly that kids NEED early intervention for speech. It could be something as simple as fluid in his ears. It could be a language disorder. It could be a sign of autism.<br><br>
Can you at least encourage them to follow up on the language bit?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LynnS6</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8187012"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">So, are they doing anything for the speech delay? They don't have to investigate autism if they don't want to, but I feel very strongly that kids NEED early intervention for speech. It could be something as simple as fluid in his ears. It could be a language disorder. It could be a sign of autism.<br><br>
Can you at least encourage them to follow up on the language bit?</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,245 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>RainCoastMama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/8187159"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I totally agree - my background in working with kids (and my own anal nature) screams at me that they should be doing *something*...but again, it's a sticky situation in that she wasn't even 'supposed' to tell me, and I got a quick email back asking me not to discuss it with her for the reasons she stated. We're good friends, but I know that it gets complicated when you stick your nose into someone else's parenting (sigh). I really don't know if I can bring it up again with jeopardizing the friendship and making for an uncomfortable relationship. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I guess it's a wait and see, and hope that a professional intervenes. FWIW...both of them work in the medical field (not doctors) so they're fairly bright people. I hope their self diagnoses are correct (in that there's nothing more than a speech delay...)</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Your are sure right about it being complicated when its someones elses parenting -they've got to be open to it. Hope it all works out<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/hug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="hug">
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top