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A recent study published in the Journal of the American Medical Association found that cereals introduced into the diets of babies before the age of 4 months or after the age of 7 months increase the risk of insulin-dependent diabetes in susceptible children.

I am expecting to get and earful from my WIC nurses (whever i start going
) about this since i imagine baby wont be eating their stinking cereal by then

What do ya'll think?
 

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I think that baby cereal is one of the nastier things you can give a baby anyhow. It is information I hope makes its way to women who have a family history of juvenile diabetes, but I don't think the study should be used in an attempt to scare all women away from baby cereal, since the danger clearly doesn't apply to everyone.
 

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I agree with finding the original study and reading it. My first question is: what about other foods first introduced past 7 months? I fear the 'baby cereal' is a paradigm stemming from the artificial baby milk mentality- baby gets formula until x date, then cereal gets mixed in, then on x date commercial, jarred baby foods are fed. Whatever happened to the natural scenario of: baby nurses until self-weans and whenever baby is ready he starts reaching for food at the family table and mouthing, gnawing on appropriately-textured foods? I think a lot of people in this society have lost sight of that.
Why else study just baby cereals? I would also be interested to know exactly who did the study and who funded it. Sounds a bit like a scare tactic to get parents to force cereal on babies between the ages of 4 and 7 months, regardless if the baby is ready for it or not. Wondering who came up with such a narrow and strange question to be studied...
 
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