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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have to interview for an employee p/t because dh got promoted and can't watch Bryn anymore <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I need someone to cover me so I can just bring ds to check up on them. I interviewed three women in the beginning of the year and ended up asking about their kids, family life, etc, instead of getting down to business. Dh said I won't find anyone trying to be their friend and talking kids <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">: I guess I just don't know how to ask the right questions, how to act professional w/out faking it. Any suggestions? Did you screwup in the beginning but get better as you gave more interviews? Did you read books on how to interview potential employees? I know it's legally none of my business whether they have kids or not, to even ask, or the fact that I only give interviews to women with children.<br><br>
Anyway, I am wondering if anyone has suggestions, TIA!
 

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Hmmm, doing interviews right now and ask lots of silly questions like "describe yourself," "Tell me about previous jobs" What was your favorite job and why" "your least favorite job and why" Who was your favorite supervisor and why" Your least favorite and why" "What would you want from an ideal supervisor" "Do you consider yourself a follower or leader and why"<br><br>
Lots of leading questions so I can get a fix on body language and personality. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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We like to use a lot of situational things.<br><br>
Tell me about a situation in which you were uncomfortable with the decision that was made. How did you handle that? What did you do?
 

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I tend to ask candidates to describe a typical day where they are working now. I also ask situation questions. And my new favorite to ask: If I was giving you your review right now what would I be asking you to work on.<br><br>
I also wanted to add that when I first started interviewing people I was terrible at it. I have gotten better with time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Hi Sarah!<br><br>
Thanks mommas! I guess I have been working for myself for so long I have forgotten what is asked, etc. I guess I always hated how uncomfortable an interview usually is and when it comes down to it I just want people to like me <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">: I have to get used to being in charge and expecting someone to expect that I am in charge, not a mom w/ a baby w/ full boobies :LOL , lots of laundry to get done, etc.
 

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I do give interviews, and I have a pamphlet of questions to draw from (provided by the company.) I don't rely on it too much, but its helpful to glance over it before going in....<br><br>
I am careful NOT to ask personal questions about family life and stuff, because if I don't hire someone, I don't want to hear back that I passed them up for the wrong reasons. You could seriously get in trouble if someone claims you didn't hire them because they have too many kids, or some nonsense like that.<br><br>
I tend to keep my interviews to 20 minutes or less. I often know within about 5 minutes whether I want to hire them or not. If not - then I wrap it up politely and quickly. If I'm interested -- then I ask questions about scheduling and hours.<br><br>
I also ask situational questions... "Tell me about a challenge you faced on the job, and how you resolved it..." Or "Tell me how you handled a demanding customer..." That sort of thing.<br><br>
I ask them what their professional plans look like over the next 5 years. I am looking for an answer that tells me they *want* to be in the business that I am in, and they are interested and enthusiastic about the particulars. I want to get the impression they will be with me for at least a year or so. And I want to hear that they are goal oriented in general -- not just drifting along trying things out.<br><br>
I encourage them to ask me questions, and I don't generally hire a person who doesn't have any questions. If they don't ask questions, then my impression is that they either haven't paid attention to what the job entails, or they don't care.
 

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I like to think that we give pretty darn good interviews around here. And based on the fact that we have almost never let someone go during their probation, and most of our staff stay for 5 years or more, I think we're doing something right.<br><br>
Here's a bit of a rough idea of what we do.<br><br>
For yourself, make sure you have a job description of what you are hiring for. What are you really looking for? You need to be clear on what are the challenging parts of the job for the candidate, what are the most important skills? I'm not talking about the stuff that you see on job descriptions - MBA, 2 years exp. in the field, blah blah blah. I mean, is attention to detail the do or die skill in this job. Will they need to stand up to that obnoxious client who just won't go away? Do they need to know how to negotiate with that other high maintainence department.<br><br>
Read their resume. Read between the lines. See if you can figure out their skill set, strengths and weaknesses, why they changed jobs, etc etc. (I love this part...)<br><br>
If possible, have 2 people do the interview together. It just gives you that much more feedback. While one person is taking notes, the other can be actively listening to the responses. First, give a description of your business and the position that's being offered. You don't want to waste time and then find out that the person is not even interested in the job. Ask "is this what you expected?".<br><br>
Prepare questions for the candidate. If there are holes in what you know about their past employment history, or if there is something you are hesitant about, this is your opportunity to find it out. Ask them to describe a process from their current job, start to finish. You will find out if they can string a sentence together, are they thorough, will they give you enough info when they report to you, etc etc. They should be able to describe something about their jobs that you don't know how to do without too much jargon.<br><br>
We also give candidates 3 or 4 "what if" situations. They are all based on things that have happened in our company. They give some insight into the real challenges of the job, and you get a good sense of whether or not people can think on their feet and can problem solve. We preface these by saying "there are no right answers, all current staff handle it differently, which is a strength of our dept".<br><br>
CALL REFERENCES. You'd be surprised. I've had references call me before I could call them and tell me NOT to hire the person. Once a reference was the candidate's mother. I kid you not.<br><br>
Remember that an interview should be a 2-way thing. You need the candidate to fullly understand the job they are applying for. If after all that you find multiple candidates who are fully qualified for the job, THEN it comes down to personality. Yes, personality does matter. I still remember the horrid person I hired before I figured this out. Yes, we had to fire her.<br><br>
Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I like the idea of finding out how they would deal with a issue ( client) if I'm not there, etc. That's my biggest worry. Also attention to detail. But it seems *everyone* says they pay attention to detail. I have two interviews in an hour so I'm glad I have some *real* questions to ask!
 

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Re: attention to detail. Asking them to describe a process or task from start to finish can give you *some* idea about that. But that is a good question to ask a reference.
 
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