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...Make it crawl the plank!<br><br>
I'm not sure if this should go here or in life with a babe, so, if it needs to be moved, please do so...<br><br>
DD's 9 mos visit was a couple weeks ago. Everything's going great, ahead on milestones, growing well, blah blah blah.<br><br>
Except for one thing...her eyes still cross. Well, I should say "eye". Her right eye...*blatantly* whenever she turns her head sideways to look at something, looks at something close to her, and occasionally when she's looking head on.<br><br>
Doc wants her to go see an opthamologist....Our insurance will cover it if I can FIND a pediatric opthamologist that takes our insurance (and if I can't, our insurance company will just need to make an authorization after getting a referral..hoops, but not impossible). But, what will they really do? I suppose an eye patch?<br><br>
Has anyone had a baby with regularly crossing eye(s) at this age (she's almost 10 mos now, and still doing it) and what did you do, and what was the outcome?
 

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I have no experience with it but it's good for you to do some research before simply following orders.<br><br>
A while ago I did read that even myopia will correct itself given the chance and not to rush into getting glasses for children.
 

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I'm going to give the opposite advice - dh had a lazy eye as a child, it wasn't corrected and the result is that he has no depth perception.<br><br>
I would have her seen by a pediatric ophthalmologist and see what they say. You don't have to follow their advice if your research shows that it's not decent advice, but these kinds of issues are always easier to treat earlier, when the brain connections are forming.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Gitti</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7964054"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have no experience with it but it's good for you to do some research before simply following orders.<br><br>
A while ago I did read that even myopia will correct itself given the chance and not to rush into getting glasses for children.</div>
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Yeah. I had mild myopia as a child, and my parents made me wear glasses from about he age of 7. My sister, 5 years younger, got glasses at the same age for the same thing, but refused to wear them. Now, she can see fine without glasses and I am dependent. My eyes got a little worse every year due to the crutch.
 

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I'd try and get her seen if possible. If it is a lazy eye, it can probably be corrected or you can help her out. It could be an indication of something else too though.<br><br>
I have something called Duane's syndrome and it is characterized by a "lazy" looking eye. This was not diagnosed until I was in my 20s and it was too late to do any ot to help with it. Because I had no treatment, my prescription in my eyes are VASTLY different and I get headaches constantly along with eye strain and other wonderful things.<br><br>
While blindly following doctor's orders is not always a good thing. Being informed of possible conditions is another.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>LynnS6</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7964226"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I'm going to give the opposite advice - dh had a lazy eye as a child, it wasn't corrected and the result is that he has no depth perception.<br><br>
I would have her seen by a pediatric ophthalmologist and see what they say. You don't have to follow their advice if your research shows that it's not decent advice, but these kinds of issues are always easier to treat earlier, when the brain connections are forming.</div>
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dh had a lazy eye too, and it was corrected with an eye patch, and when he recently saw an eye dr for an unrelated issue the doctor was surprised that dh had a functioning eye with the severity of his astigmatism. so the correction worked really well.
 

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<a href="http://www.pedseye.com/EsotropiaA.htm" target="_blank">http://www.pedseye.com/EsotropiaA.htm</a><br><br>
we just went through this with our dd, now she has glasses. it is best to get it looked at, when left untreated for too long it can effect the vision permanently. (we are not run-to-the-dr-for-everything type people here, but i really didnt want to mess around with dds vision!)
 

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My son developed the eye crossing issue around the time he turned 2. He's extremely farsighted and he has accomodative esotropia due to his farsightedness.<br><br>
The glasses have corrected the problem obvious part of the problem (eye crossing) and ds LOVES his glasses. Our ped optho chose not to completely correct the farsightedness because ds's eyes are still developing at this age and he wanted them to work a little instead of depending on the glasses.<br><br>
Good luck finding a ped optho!! Have you tried calling your insurance company for a list of local ped opthos? They should know which doctors are on their plan and it would be faster for them to make the search then for you to call every one in the area!<br><br>
As for what they do: Ours had cards and a projection with pictures or a movie or something for ds to look at while he examined his eyes. They used drops to dilate his eyes, and he didn't mind at all. He didn't like GETTING the drops, but he had no issues after that. He didn't mention it at all which is better than I did the last time I had MY eyes dilated <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>tbavrbab</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7996333"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My son developed the eye crossing issue around the time he turned 2. He's extremely farsighted and he has accomodative esotropia due to his farsightedness.<br><br>
The glasses have corrected the problem obvious part of the problem (eye crossing) and ds LOVES his glasses. Our ped optho chose not to completely correct the farsightedness because ds's eyes are still developing at this age and he wanted them to work a little instead of depending on the glasses.<br><br>
Good luck finding a ped optho!! Have you tried calling your insurance company for a list of local ped opthos? They should know which doctors are on their plan and it would be faster for them to make the search then for you to call every one in the area!<br><br>
As for what they do: Ours had cards and a projection with pictures or a movie or something for ds to look at while he examined his eyes. They used drops to dilate his eyes, and he didn't mind at all. He didn't like GETTING the drops, but he had no issues after that. He didn't mention it at all which is better than I did the last time I had MY eyes dilated <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"></div>
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This sounds a lot like my dd. She started wearing glasses at age 3. We do the patching every night. I had to do a lot of calling to our insurance company who didn't think it was necessary to see an ophthalmologist. i used this line "I know that if this goes untreated, she could lose vision in the affected eye, that would be a huge liability for your company" We had the approval within the hour. there are some wonderful pediatric ophthalmologists out there. all the best to your daughter.
 
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