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I like the idea of having a set of general curriculum goals for my kids, regardless of the style of homeschooling we settle on (even with unschooling I could use it as a checklist of "yes, they seem to know most of this stuff"). And I really like the fact that World Book has a list of common curriculum standards online - it's a nice, simple format. But I'm not too thrilled about the standards themselves.<br><br>
For instance, in first grade, the social studies list is:<br>
* Holidays, traditions, and customs<br>
* Our American Heritage<br>
* Different cultures at different times<br>
* Family, school, neighborhood, community<br>
* Farm and zoo<br>
* Neighborhood helpers<br>
* Jobs and careers<br>
* Social skills and responsibilities<br>
* Basic geography terms<br>
* Making and reading a simple neighborhood map<br><br>
Something about the list reminds me of all those activities we used to do in school that never had any practical application in my life. I didn't dislike them (I was the kind of kid who liked worksheets), but I don't think I learned anything from them either. I'm thinking of activities like filling out worksheets on your family heritage, doing holiday art activities, learning cute career summaries like "this is what a doctor does" and "this is what a fireman does" ... you know the kind of thing I'm talking about?<br><br>
Does anyone know of a better curriculum site? Or have suggestions of their own? I'm thinking I might try to write up my own list of learning goals instead, but I want it to be realistic, and I've never really taught other children before.<br><br>
I know some people are probably not into curriculum lists like this at all, but A) I like taking notes, and B) I want to have something on paper to show my in-laws to prove that the kids are learning something. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

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Discussion Starter #2
P.S. Duh, forgot the link: <a href="http://www.worldbook.com/wb/Students?curriculum/grade1" target="_blank">http://www.worldbook.com/wb/Students?curriculum/grade1</a>
 

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You might want to look at the Rebecca Rupp book Home Learning Year by Year. She lists academic goals and topics, along with some resource suggestions. They seem a little more relevant than the ones in your list here.<br>
HTH<br>
Karen
 

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I like the world book list because it is very simple and very general. I think many of the things on there are learned through living and since HSed kids have more "living" time they are not things that require direct instruction.
 

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I make my own list of goals because one of my reasons for homeschooling is to give my kids a certain kind of education, a different one then they would receive at ps. I can't even imagine wasting my time on 'Neighbourhood helpers' <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> does a kid really need a unit on policemen, Doctors and firemen?? Surly you here and see a fire engine go past and say "Oh look a fire engine there must be a fire out that way" No need for contrived sheets as you said.<br><br>
Those lists might give you some ideas for your own list, but really you have to decide what you think is important. For me for first grade the important things are adding, subtracting and reading. Everything else is just icing on the cake.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Karenwith4</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7987237"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You might want to look at the Rebecca Rupp book Home Learning Year by Year. She lists academic goals and topics, along with some resource suggestions. They seem a little more relevant than the ones in your list here.<br>
HTH<br>
Karen</div>
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This book is great. I hesitated at first to buy it because I didn't really want to "design a curriculum from preschool through high school", but this is a book full of great resources for anyone, schoolers or unschoolers. I think it would really be what you're looking for since the objectives for each grade level are there though I think some of the objectives are quite optimistic for a PS setting. I doubt that they all get met effectively in a classroom of 20 or 30 kids.
 

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Unschoolers in states with rigorous reporting requirements learn to translate daily life into "educationese"- throwing stones into a pond is nature study, physics, geology; building with lego is math, cooperative play, architecture; stuff like that... (I'm not coming up with great examples right now, but I hope you get the point... here's a randomly found page from googling just now: <a href="http://www.geocities.com/sablehs/Educationese.html" target="_blank">http://www.geocities.com/sablehs/Educationese.html</a><br><br>
I think the trick with the Worldbook lists is that it is written in "educationese", and needs to be translated <i>out</i> of that, which can be fairly hard for a schooled adult to do. You read that and see worksheets and indoor projects and lectures with no actual connection to the outside world, when instead the list can be useful for thoughts and ideas about what a kid might be interested in at this age, or ready to consider, but you need to translate it <i>away</i> from what you picture a school to mean when they say they did these things.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Eris</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7993009"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You read that and see worksheets and indoor projects and lectures with no actual connection to the outside world, when instead <b>the list can be useful for thoughts and ideas about what a kid might be interested in at this age, or ready to consider</b>, but you need to translate it <i>away</i> from what you picture a school to mean when they say they did these things.</div>
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This is how I use the World Book lists. I feel less anxious about being so relaxed in our schooling when I look over it and see that we have naturally covered a lot of it. You can start off by checking off the topics you feel your child has a good grasp of (like neighborhood helpers). Then, instead of using it for lesson planning up front, you could look over the list a few times a year and check off topics you've covered. If you want to do more, you could spend maybe a week or two at the end of your school year "catching up" on areas that you think are important from the list.
 

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Discussion Starter #9
Aha!<br><br>
I just figured out that the phrase I need to be googling is "scope and sequence." Now I've found TONS of these lists.<br><br>
I like the point someone made about "educationese." I'm thinking I will gather some of these lists and rewrite them in language that sounds more appropriate to me, but covers most of the same stuff. Apparently the law here requires record-keeping which doesn't have to be turned in, but has to be available to the superintendent upon request, so when I get to that point I will need to have something in writing to show him. (The superintendent has been very friendly, so hopefully I can just have a friendly chat about what kind of records he wants, if any.)<br><br>
I was expecting this to all be very theoretical at this point, but a lot of these S&S lists go down to preschool, some even to 2yos! So I guess I can go ahead and start now, for practice if nothing else ... and to have something neatly organized in writing to show my MIL. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngtongue.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Stick Out Tongue">
 

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Educationese cracks me up. My five year old was recently doing a math page. It was finding the pattern; you know, do you draw a circle now after two squares or do you draw another square.<br><br>
Now, if *I* were going to write down what he'd been doing I would have written down "patterns".<br><br>
At the bottom of the page, however, was the concept that was covered on that page. It was something like, "Algebraic thinking". I thought, what educationese! If I was reading, say, my state standards and saw that next to kindergarten I would be convinced that my child was, oh, eight years behind. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">:<br><br>
Now I keep in mind that I must never be intimidated by educationese and give it a wide berth with translation.
 
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