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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am writing the contract for my new nanny. I want to make sure that I include a comprehensive description of her responsibilites. It so far includes safety things (e.g. carseats must be used at all time when transporting the children) and household tasks (put away children's clean laundry on Thursdays), and interaction tasks (take children on various outings, etc.). I was just cruious to see what others would include on a list of nanny responsiblties.<br><br>
I have a separate addendum to the contract that lists our daily schedule, house rules, and activites and outings.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>annekevdbroek</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14756133"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am writing the contract for my new nanny. I want to make sure that I include a comprehensive description of her responsibilites. It so far includes safety things (e.g. carseats must be used at all time when transporting the children) and household tasks (put away children's clean laundry on Thursdays), and interaction tasks (take children on various outings, etc.). I was just cruious to see what others would include on a list of nanny responsiblties.<br><br>
I have a separate addendum to the contract that lists our daily schedule, house rules, and activites and outings.</div>
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Admittedly, I have never hired a nanny so take my advice with a grain of salt. I believe childcare providers need to be flexible, as should parents. I would definitely leave wiggle room in the schedule for unexpected things, like say little Johnny doesn't want to go to story time at the library on Wednesday but would rather go to the park? I would much rather have my nanny do something that makes my child happy than stick to a schedule of outings. Maybe that's not what you meant but putting a schedule in a contract makes it seem non-negotiable. To me, contracts need to be followed to the letter of the law and not everything with childcare can be legislated, to use that word loosely.<br><br>
I think having a nanny whose philosophy about childcare is similar to your own is much more important than having everything written out in a contract. GL!
 

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This is a great resource:<br><a href="http://www.advancenannies.com/free_nanny_family_contract.html" target="_blank">http://www.advancenannies.com/free_n..._contract.html</a>
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>bluebunny</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/14756291"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I would definitely leave wiggle room in the schedule for unexpected things, like say little Johnny doesn't want to go to story time at the library on Wednesday but would rather go to the park? I would much rather have my nanny do something that makes my child happy than stick to a schedule of outings. Maybe that's not what you meant but putting a schedule in a contract makes it seem non-negotiable.</div>
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I agree with this and also that something about your parenting philosophy and how you expect the children to be treated should be included. I know this would be hard to put into words but it would be important to me to ensure that we are on the same page.<br><br>
Also, I would advise that it is very easy for contracts to become one-sided and negative sounding. To offset this, include, in either a special section or peppered throughout whenever approprate, commitments that you will make to the nanny. Commitments about the sort of things that will make her job easier and make her feel welcome, respected and appreciated. Worked into these commitments can be an acknowledgment of her rights.
 

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I was a nanny for 12 years, and know many nannies, because I attended a "Nanny School" (yes there is such a thing) so this is the opposite point of view but I hope I can help you a little.<br><br>
I agree that flexibility is a must! A comfortable and respected nanny is the best kind to have, you will get the most out of her/him because it will be less like a job and more like family.<br><br>
I looked at the link above and I think one thing that is good to be flexible on is sick days. If I was able to function but knew I was contagious I liked to stay home, otherwise we would have a cycle of sickness that would go on forever. I don't think nanny sick days should be treated like other jobs for that reason.<br><br>
One thing that was often unclear to many nannies I know is household chores. Some people think nannies are house cleaners, and to be honest, for a professional nanny that can be insulting because their job is to take care of the most important thing in your life, not your house. So laying down expectations there is always a good idea, and some nannies are perfectly happy doing housework. I did a lot of organizing for my families, especially in the kids' rooms...getting rid of stuff they don't use, cleaning up etc...but that was something I did extra (and for my own sanity! lol!) I just think that for the most part a status quo house is good, keeping the house the way it is, if not slightly cleaner at the time to go home. All toys/dishes taken care of etc. Again, flexibility is a must, when we would build a giant fort in the LR I would often leave it so they could continue playing with it, and that was okay too.<br><br>
An issue I ran into with a family: We went on a vacation and they thought that was payment enough. I had the baby in my room and was responsible for him the whole time. We were at a very fancy resort (in which I was quite uncomfortable...models and pro golf players everywhere) and I had no idea what to do all day...and when they left the resort for outtings they didn't take me so I was stranded w/ no money or transportation...and alone. They assumed this fabulous vacation was payment enough and didn't pay me for the trip. Please don't do that! It was a lot of work, waking in the middle of the night, entertaining a baby at a resort for adults.<br><br>
Discipline is also something you should talk about, professional nannies will never use physical punishment, (or shouldn't, but I do know families that have requested the nanny do it! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">) but if you use time-outs etc..and want her to do the same you need to let her know. I often implimented extra disciplinary tools, such as sticker charts to target issues we may have been having.<br><br>
I think the schedule is a good idea, as in, "these are options for outings and what the kids like to do at these times" but not something that dictates every day activities.<br><br>
Use of a car/facilities...especially for a live-in. I would hope that the car seat rule would not be necessary, if you can, it's always nice to buy the nanny her own seats.<br><br>
Not really necessary for a contract but something that was always a little blurry for me was my "spare" time on the job. Nannies don't have lunch breaks, or breaks at all...and it's very uncomfortable not knowing what you can do. My jobs always said it was fine for me to make personal phone calls (not long ones obviously), or even read/watch a little TV while the baby naps and if I am done doing things.<br><br>
I've had jobs where we had meetings w/out kids to address any issues/concerns. I've also had a job w/ food allergies where I needed to write down everything they ate. I think anything concerning the kids is reasonable to expect. I did all grocery, school and clothing shopping for kids, and even planned birthday parties.<br><br>
It's good to have expectations, and I always liked the types of contracts that were flexible, but give you an idea (such as laundry on a certain day, etc) of what is expected of you. Flexibility is very important though.<br><br>
Good luck with your new nanny! Feel free to pm me if you have any Nanny pov questions. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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I did a contract with my nanny. If you want me to email it to you, feel free to PM me your email address. it was only a couple of pages but it covered duties, time off, things that were absolutely not allowed (like smoking around the kids, etc), kids schedules and addresses of schools, and pay rate.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Everyone!<br><br>
No worries on the schedule - it is more about what time the older needs to be at school and picked-up. I do not specify outings. Just that there is a time window for "playdates, outings, play time."<br><br>
Good point about vacation and sick days. I am giving 2 weeks to be used as needed. I get a month of leave plus federal holiday, so have also specified that there will be additional paid days off according to my schedule. I am paying a salary based on average hours per week. It's easier for me and nicer for the nanny because we both know the pay to expect and hours.<br><br>
Thank you for the reminder about outlining her benefits. We discussed it, but I need to make sure it ends up on paper.
 
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