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<p>I speak my native language with my parents, DH is English monolingual, as are his parents. Anyone else in a similar situation? What do your children call their respective grandparents?</p>
 

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<p>DD doesn't call them much of anything yet, but we're using Grammi and Paddy (the names my parents chose) and Apashka and Atashka (Kazakh for Grandma and Grandpa).</p>
 

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English speaking grandparents are called by their first names. Spanish speaking relatives use their respective Spanish title, so tia, abuelita, etc.
 

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<p>My mil is called "Mamie", which is the typical French grandma name and what her other grandchildren call her. </p>
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<p>My mom hated all grandmother titles and actually took the other grandmother name in French "Mémé" (said like "may-may"). No, she doesn't speak French. Both grandfathers had passed away before we were married. My dh will call his dad "Papi" to the kids, which bothers me, as he never met them. Mine is just referred to as "your/my father" (I should ad that my father was very young when he died so it's tough for anyone to picture him in the role). </p>
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<p>My mom's husband, who never had any bio-kids, was very happy to be called "Grandpa". </p>
 

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<p>Dh's parents are nanna and nonna (they are italian). My dad is grandpa and first name.</p>
 

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<p>They call their local grandparents Avi Enric/Avia Mari and then following that model, call my parents Grammie Jane and Grampa Scott.  I knew my mom would be a Grammie and then the kids just sort of went from there.  My dad lives in the south now and seemed to be interested in Paw-Paw, but we never see him and it sounds/feels strange to me, so we don't use it.  All of our local relatives know who the kids are talking about when they say Grammie Jane and my mom rolls with "els avis" with no problem.  I'd pretty much leave it up to the kids and grandparents.  Family members learn the names of important people in others lives regardless of the language of the title</p>
 

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<p>Somehow it happened that dd named all her grandparents when she could hardly talk in any language, so they are totally new words or new variations of words that could be used. Sounds funny, but works for us. (The word for my mom could be understood to mean a much younger woman who is married to my dad. My parents have been married for over 35 yrs... Luckily, mom has a good sense of humor and loves her name.)</p>
 

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<p>My parents are Gran and Papi (she's Irish/American, he's Mexican) and DH's parents are Teta and Giddo (Lebanese). We tried to go with Sito for MIL, but when they were babies Sito and Giddo sounded too much alike, so she said we should call her Teta instead.</p>
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<p>My sister's kids, who are French, call her in-laws Mamie and Papi, so then they don't call my dad Papi like my kids do. Instead they call him Grampy.</p>
 

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<p>My mother (English) is "nana" to my kids.  My father (German) is "opa".</p>
 

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On the Spanish-speaking side, we use typical abuela/tio titles.<br>
On the English side, we use Tio/tia for my sibs because they're flexible, Grandpa for my dad because he's not, and nanay for my mom because she thought that was grandmother in Tagolag (which it's not). I found that annoying on so many levels, but DD ended up saying it like na-NAH anyway, so we found an ok compromise. <img alt="smile.gif" class="bbcode_smiley" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/smile.gif">
 

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<p>My Abuela is still alive so she is Abuela, but my parents get Grammy and grampa.  DH's parents are Nana & Grandpat.  I told my mom that I want to be called Abuela or Abuelita by my grandchildren though.  My older sister is Tia, my younger sister goes by Auntie.</p>
 

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<p>My parents (English speaking) are Grandpa and Nonnie (my Mom is Italian).</p>
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<p>For my husband's family, we use the Arabic words for Grandma, Uncle, Aunt, etc.  There are also different words for Uncles and Aunts on your Mom's side vs. your Dad's side.  So we use all of the one's for Dad's side.</p>
 

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<p>My parents (American-English speaking) are Nana and Pop, which is consistent with what my neices who live in the states call them. Then here in Peru consistent with her cousins are abuelo (juan), abuelita (feli). here in peru it's actually harder as the names they use can change. my neices call them abuelita or mamita feli or papito Juan. I'm trying to just go with abuelo and abuela.<br>
We'll see. My daughter isn't talking yet.</p>
 

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<p>My parents are Oma and Opa (German). DH's mom is nonna as she does not want to be called grandma (her dad is Italian, her mom Slovakian but she was born in Argentina), DH's grandma is Abuelita (technically she's 100% Solvakian, but born and raised in Argentina)....</p>
 

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<p>My parents are Grandma and Grandpa. DH's mom is teta (Arabic for grandma) and his stepdad is amo (which means "uncle"). If the kids ever asked to call him zhiddo (grandpa) I'm sure he'd be fine with it, but since they don't really have a feel for what the different titles mean and have only met him twice, I doubt they'll ever ask.</p>
 
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