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Ok, this may be a stupid question, but what exactly does eczema look like? DD's reactions to food intolerances so far have been GI and sleep related. But she has on and off over the past 1-2 months had a rash on her face around her mouth and chin (and sometimes nose) that comes and goes. I thought the entire time that it was a drool rash from teething but it doesn't always correlate to when she is heavily drooling. And she had a reaction to something yesterday (still not sure what) and her rash is terrible today and is over her nose and eyes. It consists of little red dots and her skin feels a bit rough. I haven't noticed her scratching it a lot and it isn't oozing or anything like that. She also has had a dry patch of skin behind one of her ears for at least a month. Does this sound like eczema? If so, is it typical for eczema to surface later than GI symptoms?
 

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It takes DD's skin a little longer to react than her digestive system, so I think that's normal. Her eczema starts out as little dots, or little bubbles just under her skin. If it is a bad enough reaction, the bubbles will make their way to the surface and start to ooze and get crusty. Less severe areas just have tiny dots or bumps and dry, itchy skin. I think I have a couple pictures of the eczema on DD's face on my blog.
 

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The eczema on my dd looks like a red chafed spot - dry and red. no blisters or bubbles or oozing. She gets it behind her ears at times too (common spot, as is behind the knees). My DS got the rash on his upper lip for a couple foods (soy and something else I can't remember now) and he'd get that within half hour of eating the food. And it would last for about 3 days. The eczema lasts longer than other symptoms as far as I can tell. Takes about a week for it to go away completely after taking the food out.
 

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Thanks for the responses. I'm thinking this rash is probably eczema unfortunately. It's still all over her chin, mouth, nose, and eyes, and the patch behind her ear is always there. I will start watching it more closely to see if it gets worse when she has a bad reaction.
 

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OMG- I was coming here to post the EXACT same thing. My dd is nearly 12mo and has the exact same rash. She does have eczema (dx last year, without the face rash), so is that what this could be?<br><br>
I do wonder if it's a food thing, though.... We're already gluten free.
 

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Eczema patches generally show up in the crooks of your arms and behind your knees, as well as your bottom and face. It can look like ringworm somewhat. It can very easily turn into open sores because it is itchy and the child will scratch. You can do a google search and find pics. The rash my daughter had before she was diagnosed covered almost her entire body.<br><br>
What you are describing sounds more like my other daughter's reaction to gluten, but it could be both. (Food and other allergens can make it worse, but they do not cause it.) If you suspect that it is indeed eczema I would start her on Cod Liver Oil or Flax Seed Oil on a daily basis. CLO is better but if she can't tolerate it or you are vegan, flax will work okay. We also use Alba Un-petroleum jelly for topical care. (I used to recommend Burt's Bees Apricot Oil but they got bought out by Clorox and now list "vegetable oil' among several other unappetizing ingredients.)
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>fruitfulmomma</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/12365820"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">(Food and other allergens can make it worse, but they do not cause it.)</div>
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I'm curious what makes you say that. I think that food and/or enviro allergies absolutely CAN cause eczema.
 

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If dd does not consume corn, she does not have eczema AT ALL. Eats corn, has eczema within a day. Hers is most definitely caused by food (and doesn't show up on allergy or intolerance tests).
 

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When I said cause I was speaking of why a child develops the disease, not the symptoms of the disease. As I said, food allergies can make it worse. In other words, they can cause/trigger outbreaks. But you still *have* eczema even when there is no outbreak.<br><br>
If your daughter breaks out while eating corn, then that is her trigger. My daughter's main trigger is stress. She had her first huge outbreak when I had my third child who was admitted to NICU. She has outbreaks any time she is away from us for too long. She has some allergies that trigger minor outbreaks as well, but not as much as the stress. She has no food allergies that I am aware of.<br><br>
Do a search for eczema or Atopic dermatitis and you will find that the most do not believe there is a specific known cause or cure for this disease. I believe there are probably both genetic and nutritional deficiency factors involved in it. We have had success in treating dd'`s outbreaks with CLO (for essential fatty acids) and probiotics for gut flora.<br><br>
One huge reason I believe it is a disease and not merely a response to certain allergens you come into contact with is that the CDC, who is certainly not known for their anti-vax recommendations, state on their website the following... (<a href="http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/smallpox/vaccination/close-contacts.asp" target="_blank">http://www.bt.cdc.gov/agent/smallpox...e-contacts.asp</a>)<br><br>
"But, people with certain health conditions are more likely to have serious reactions to the smallpox vaccine. These people should not be vaccinated and they should not be in close contact with someone who has been vaccinated...You should NOT be in close contact with someone who has been vaccinated if you: * Ever had or now have atopic dermatitis, often called "eczema" (even if you had the condition as a baby or child and even if the condition is mild)"<br><br>
(You can read about what happened to a child who came into contact with his father, who is enrolled in the military, when he was given the vaccine against CDC recommendation - <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/18/health/18smallpox.html?em&ex=1179547200&en=a80c67e786b9aafa&ei=5087%0A" target="_blank">http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/18/he...afa&ei=5087%0A</a>.)<br><br>
In other words, there is some underlying condition in *all* people with eczema that does not allow their body to fight off certain allergens or disease in the same way as those without the disease would and that makes them susceptible to serious reactions to this particular vaccine.
 
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