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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>I am a sophomore in college and I am a few semesters away from starting nursing school with my ultimate goal of becoming a midwife.</p>
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<p>I am planning on getting an RN degree and starting in L&D and then pursue from there. Is there anyone else who has taken this route? What should I expect? How long does this usually take? </p>
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<p>Stories?</p>
 

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<p>Jobs for new grads in L&D are rare these days. Since many a new grad has difficulty finding a hospital job, and when they do get hired it is usually more general area rather then a speciality like L&D. Experienced nurses are just preferred (easy to get up and running rather then months and months of training) in these times. Some hospitals have requirements of working X amount of time on med/surg before going into a speciality, usually 1-2 years. </p>
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<p>You have to realize that nursing has not been recession proof, many part time nurses or nurses who were not currently working returned to the nursing profession. It varies vastly by area to area, rural area tend to still need nurses, other metro area are just full of new grads that can't find any jobs forget about going into a prized speciality like L&D. Scope out the job market in your area, by the time you are graduated things could be greatly different as well. If you are not limited to staying in your area and can move that might help you out. Or maybe your area actually does need nurses, and has hospitals willing to train new grads in areas like L&D, there are some out there, just far less then there used to be. It used to be not that difficult to start off in L&D if you were motivated and kept hunting for hospital that would take you. </p>
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<p>Bottom line of what I am saying it that it is impossible to give you an estimate of how long it will take. Once you are in L&D then work for a couple years, get your bearings, and start midwifery school. There are some CNM programs that do not requirements of working in L&D for x amount of time before applying either. </p>
 

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<p>I am actually really lucky since I live in a rural metro area where medical professionals of all kinds (L&D nurses included) are in high demand. And I feel as though my midwife would probably try to refer me to some of the places that she went to get her degrees and such since I'd love to be working in her practice and deliver at her hospital. I have a ton of support for my choices down here and for that I am glad.</p>
 

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<p>I was going to do it that way, but realized along the way that my birth philosophy wouldn't allow me to work in a L&D unit.  I disagree with too many of their procedures and how often they are used.  I can not be apart of that. </p>
 

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<p>This is the path I took.  I was young, got a L&D job straight out of school, worked 2 years, went to midwifery school.</p>
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<p>The biggest mistake I took?  Was crazy amounts of loans for midwifery school.  When it's time for you to go to grad school, really take a good look at how much CNMs make in your area.  My area is around $60,000 for routine 60 hour weeks.  That's decent pay, and if it's your calling, it's your calling, you know? <br><br>
But, if you have lots of student loans (I went to a private school, paid for completely with loans), then it's sort of depressing knowing that you could make more money as a RN than you are making as a CNM, plus you have student loans.  If I had it to do over again, I would save like crazy to pay for midwifery school, plus I would have figured out a way to go to a cheaper, non-private school, even if it meant moving away for a few years.</p>
 

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<p>Right, and I understand that. I also do not agree with a lot of their procedures but I feel as though I will personally benefit from the experience before I branch into birth center/home births. After my unnecesearean I wouldn't wish my experience on my worst enemy but I feel as though having different perspectives on the situations will benefit myself and my patients the most when i comes down to it in the end. </p>
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<p>Just like I am delivering this baby in a hospital birth center but my midwife and the staff during the hospital tour has already informed me that I can do whatever I want to make myself comfortable during labor and delivery for my VBAC. I can even go without a heplock if I choose. I could not have a home birth because of my insurance and simply not having enough to pay out of pocket. I believe that if one finds a truly supportive birth team that is willing to work with the family in however they see fit then it doesn't matter where the child is born. </p>
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<p>I had one nurse during my labor last time who went above and beyond for me and was encouraging to me in every possible way. Her philosophies were different than the rest of the hospital and she confided it to me when the doctor was not in the room. It was because of her dedication that I chose to go into nursing and midwifery in the first place. </p>
<p>I was so easily persuaded into my unnecesarean because I was uneducated in how much power I had in my own birth choices and was young and naive and taken advantage of when I was vulnerable. If someday I can inspire one woman to take charge of her birth in the future or even in that room then I will have done my job.  </p>
 

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<br><br><div class="quote-container"><span>Quote:</span>
<div class="quote-block">Originally Posted by <strong>octobermom09</strong> <a href="/community/forum/thread/1283966/what-does-it-take#post_16100619"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border-bottom:0px solid;border-left:0px solid;border-top:0px solid;border-right:0px solid;"></a><br><br><p>Right, and I understand that. I also do not agree with a lot of their procedures but I feel as though I will personally benefit from the experience before I branch into birth center/home births. After my unnecesearean I wouldn't wish my experience on my worst enemy but I feel as though having different perspectives on the situations will benefit myself and my patients the most when i comes down to it in the end. </p>
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<p>Just like I am delivering this baby in a hospital birth center but my midwife and the staff during the hospital tour has already informed me that I can do whatever I want to make myself comfortable during labor and delivery for my VBAC. I can even go without a heplock if I choose. I could not have a home birth because of my insurance and simply not having enough to pay out of pocket. I believe that if one finds a truly supportive birth team that is willing to work with the family in however they see fit then it doesn't matter where the child is born. </p>
<p> </p>
<p>I had one nurse during my labor last time who went above and beyond for me and was encouraging to me in every possible way. Her philosophies were different than the rest of the hospital and she confided it to me when the doctor was not in the room. It was because of her dedication that I chose to go into nursing and midwifery in the first place. </p>
<p>I was so easily persuaded into my unnecesarean because I was uneducated in how much power I had in my own birth choices and was young and naive and taken advantage of when I was vulnerable. If someday I can inspire one woman to take charge of her birth in the future or even in that room then I will have done my job.  </p>
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Then you are on the right path.  :)  I've only had one positive hospital birth experience out of three, so I feel it's just better for me to not go there. </p>
 

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<p>I agree with PP that talk about new grads having difficulty getting jobs.  A capstone student that we had on our unit who graduated in the Spring has still not found a new grad position, and she has applied from here (Oregon) to Texas.  I graduated nursing school (this was in 2000) and got a job in a hospital in an oncology med/surg unit.  As soon as I could transfer to another unit, I went to L&D, as they weren't hiring "new grads" but were willing to take a somewhat experienced nurse and do L&D orientation.  It was a great place to learn, as it had a level 3 nursery, a group of perinatologists and did a lot of high risk practice, so we got to see everything (they averaged over 5000 deliveries a year).  Some of the midwives I work with now did L&D for about 10 years at the bedside before they went to midwifery school.  They say they felt like they got a really good handle on the mechanics before going back and learning all the in-depth theory. </p>
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<p>I will say that I was pretty nonchalant about birth until I worked in that unit.  It scared the pants off me and to this day I hold my breath until the baby is out and pink and happy. </p>
 
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