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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since my children are so small and I can't really go "on call" so to speak, it was advised that I look into PP doula training first. I'm just wondering what exactly is a PP doula role? It sounds to me like a glorified maid or nanny <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment"> but maybe I'm not sure.<br><br>
Next question would be where do I start for training. I've seen there is DONA, ALACE, and heard of CBI. I liked the ALACE website before but now I see they aren't hosting workshops? I am looking for a program most aligned with the midwifery model of care from a natural birthing standpoint, and of course cost is a factor.
 

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A friend of mine is a pp doula. Here's what her website says she does<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">As a postpartum doula, I provide non-medical physical and emotional support and household assistance after the birth of your baby. I have received training approved by DONA (Doulas of North America), CAPPA (Childbirth and Postpartum Professional Association), as well as drawing on my years of experience in childcare and as a nanny.<br><br><br>
My goal is to help you with self-care recovery measures and assist you with the care and feeding of your new baby, including breastfeeding assistance or recourse information, bathing and comfort measures. I do not take over care of your baby, but assist you other ways so that you can focus on care for your baby's needs yourself. I will provide childcare during naps so that parents can get some much-needed rest. I can also assist you and your partner in developing a postpartum plan to target your needs. This can be done during the prenatal period of your pregnancy. It often helps to do this so that others who may want to assist you (friends and family) have a better idea of your needs. It also helps me to know as your postpartum doula what areas I can be focusing on to best support you and your family.<br><br><br>
I will also be glad to assist with light housekeeping including some laundry, household organization (can be done prior to birth), cooking as needed and errands as needed. If more in-depth household cleaning is needed, I can refer quality and reliable companies to do that for either short-term or long-term needs.</td>
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She has TONS of clients.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks! I also found a great description on the CBI site.<br><br>
So does anyone have any recommendations for best certification and training site?
 

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I have not done CBI's postpartum training but I did go throught their CBE and birth doula training. they are fantastic. their material is through and their trainers are very supportive. I would recomend them.
 

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For me DONA.org referrals have really been great for my business.<br><br>
Most weeks I get three or four calls or email coming from the DONA site. For me it was a business decision which organization to get certified by. I wanted the one with the best publicity, national recognition, and popularity so I would get the most client referrals (i have not been disappointed!)<br><br>
I liked the DONA training, and I was resistant for a long time to become certified (I was already trained as LC and CBE, and worked as a postpartum doula since 1991 and I own a service that employs 13 doulas, and I used to train all my postpartum doulas).<br><br>
To really enjoy the work a postpartum doula needs to know how to teach breastfeeding, and recognize and correct minor bf problems, and generally educate families about infant care, and maternal self care. The job entails utilizing a lot of teaching skills.<br><br>
You definitely can and will feel like a maid /nanny if that is all you have to offer a family without the other stuff. Training encourages you to become well read and educated by going to professional conferences on all the issue surrounding birth and breastfeeding and the transition issues to motherhood. This is helpful so you have that to offer to clients.
 

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I am a lay mw, but a lot of the births i attend are in remote places where I actually stay with the parents for the last weeks of pregnancy, and for at least a week after the birth, so a lot of what i do is PP doula care. basically taking care of the household and family, helping the mother to establish good BFing, diapering, babywearing, etc. i do a lot of cooking and cleaning and laundry for the family.<br>
personally, I think every family should have that kind of support PP. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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ALACE doesn't offer postpartum cert only birth cert. I chose DONA for many of the same reasons as Dewi and I've been very happy with their programs.
 

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I also certified as a postpartum doula through DONA. I thought the training was very thorough. Some of it it common sense but the information I received about the scope of a pp doula, when it's best to refer out to other professionals, and about siting my sources instead of giving advice was invaluable.<br><br>
I've heard great things about CBI too.
 
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