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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
....someone asks this somewhere else and I don't know, what's the scientific background between unsupported sitting and solids. I have an idea, but what do you say? Maybe there are some links?
 

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No links, but my thought would be that truly being ready for solids involves being to self-feed, and it's simply not safe to self-feed if you're in a prone position. An infant (well, a person, really) has to be sitting up in order not to choke.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
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Originally Posted by eurobin View Post
No links, but my thought would be that truly being ready for solids involves being to self-feed, and it's simply not safe to self-feed if you're in a prone position. An infant (well, a person, really) has to be sitting up in order not to choke.
And why would being able to self feed be required?
 

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Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
And why would being able to self feed be required?
Same as with breastfeeding and not forcing the last bit in bottles - learning to regulate intake and recognize hunger/full tummy cues. I would also think sitting up properly would open the throat and prevent choking (better, I mean, than reclined or propped in a chair). It's not really anything I've ever researched but maybe kellymom has some information.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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Originally Posted by Clarinet View Post
Same as with breastfeeding and not forcing the last bit in bottles - learning to regulate intake and recognize hunger/full tummy cues. I would also think sitting up properly would open the throat and prevent choking (better, I mean, than reclined or propped in a chair). It's not really anything I've ever researched but maybe kellymom has some information.

Kellymom doesn't have the science behind it unfortunately and that's what I need


If choking is a concern I'm sure people would recommend pureed food then.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
Kellymom doesn't have the science behind it unfortunately and that's what I need


If choking is a concern I'm sure people would recommend pureed food then.
I think the issue is actually transitioning from purees to real food. Purees don't help a child learn how to maneuver food from the front of their mouth to the back. They almost "drink" purees. But developmentally, there is very rarely a reason to give purees to a baby. Think about it - adults don't eat purees very often, and prior to just a couple generations ago, it would have been very difficult to get food pureed to a perfectly homogenized texture. Yet babies still transitioned from breastmilk to solid food - most likely by eating soft chunks or gently smooshed (but not pureed) foods.

Plus there is the issue that many people tend to force purees with the "just one more bite" mentality, so babies don't learn to self-regulate their intake. And since the parent is so actively involved (by holding the spoon, making goofy faces, doing the "airplane" to try to get another bite in), there is a thought that the baby could be learning that eating is one way to get their parents' undivided attention, thus tying unwanted emotional issues to (over)eating from the very beginning.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
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Originally Posted by alegna View Post
I think it has to do with just general development. A child is ready to eat when they eat. It is very unlikely they would eat on their own before they could sit.

-Angela
Then what do you say if you hear : he's grabbing the food from my plate!
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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Originally Posted by eurobin View Post
I think the issue is actually transitioning from purees to real food. Purees don't help a child learn how to maneuver food from the front of their mouth to the back. They almost "drink" purees. But developmentally, there is very rarely a reason to give purees to a baby. Think about it - adults don't eat purees very often, and prior to just a couple generations ago, it would have been very difficult to get food pureed to a perfectly homogenized texture. Yet babies still transitioned from breastmilk to solid food - most likely by eating soft chunks or gently smooshed (but not pureed) foods.

Plus there is the issue that many people tend to force purees with the "just one more bite" mentality, so babies don't learn to self-regulate their intake. And since the parent is so actively involved (by holding the spoon, making goofy faces, doing the "airplane" to try to get another bite in), there is a thought that the baby could be learning that eating is one way to get their parents' undivided attention, thus tying unwanted emotional issues to (over)eating from the very beginning.
I get that, but what exactly is the harm in giving pureed food then? Is there any study that shows maybe carrots for 4 months old isn't the best thing to do?
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by alegna View Post
I think it has to do with just general development. A child is ready to eat when they eat. It is very unlikely they would eat on their own before they could sit.

-Angela
Exactly
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
Then what do you say if you hear : he's grabbing the food from my plate!
This one always cracks me up. My friends son is 6 months but still has that tongue thrust reflex that pushes any solids out of his mouth, he doesn't swallow. But he grabs food from plates, and his older sister was really ready by about 5 months. My friend was doing the "he's grabbing food" story. I said to her, he's teething right? So if you had a hammer sitting in front of him like you food when he sits on your lap at diner he'd grab that and stick in his mouth, wouldn't he? She laughed at me, and said, "um yeah, he probably would."
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
I get that, but what exactly is the harm in giving pureed food then? Is there any study that shows maybe carrots for 4 months old isn't the best thing to do?
Tummies are finite, and most "real" food is less calorie-dense than breastmilk - so displacing space in the small tummy for less nutritive food could impair growth, it seems.

I think the AAP guidelines say nothing but breastmilk for the first 6 months -- that is a pretty clear statement that carrots at 4 mos. isn't the best thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
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Originally Posted by WNB View Post
Tummies are finite, and most "real" food is less calorie-dense than breastmilk - so displacing space in the small tummy for less nutritive food could impair growth, it seems.

I think the AAP guidelines say nothing but breastmilk for the first 6 months -- that is a pretty clear statement that carrots at 4 mos. isn't the best thing.

True, but they don't say WHY
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post
Then what do you say if you hear : he's grabbing the food from my plate!
My kids also grabbed my car keys. It doesn't mean they were ready to drive. They want everything people have.

Why?

Open gut is the biggest reason. Plus, the increased risk of allergies, obesity, crohn's, early weaning, etc. Kellymom also has a study that showed that babies who started before 7 months had lower iron levels than those who started after.

Plus, like someone mentioned, purees are a pretty new thing, so I think waiting until they can handle soft foods and lightly mashed foods is best.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
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Originally Posted by the_lissa View Post
My kids also grabbed my car keys. It doesn't mean they were ready to drive. They want everything people have.

Why?

Open gut is the biggest reason. Plus, the increased risk of allergies, obesity, crohn's, early weaning, etc. Kellymom also has a study that showed that babies who started before 7 months had lower iron levels than those who started after.

Plus, like someone mentioned, purees are a pretty new thing, so I think waiting until they can handle soft foods and lightly mashed foods is best.

Then if it doesn't mean anything, why is "interest in food" ( often grabbing for it being the used example) one criteria for readiness ?

Anyway, the point is "sitting", like why not give a child food if it grabs, doesn't have the extrusion reflex anymore and seems happy getting the food....but it can't sit
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by huggerwocky View Post

Anyway, the point is "sitting", like why not give a child food if it grabs, doesn't have the extrusion reflex anymore and seems happy getting the food....but it can't sit

It seems to me like the trunk strength needed to sit would be important when it comes to staying upright enough not to choke as you manuver food around your mouth and down....

-Angela
 
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