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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I'm ttc- in fact I'm pretty sure I caught this time! But due to some medical issues, I already know I'm a high risk pregnancy and probably have to deliver in a hospital(although I may get lucky and get a midwife as they are quite common here in Australia). But in case I wind up with an American-style OB, what exactly might they do if I refuse to lie on my back for delivery?

This is my first, although I've assisted in others' natural deliveries before and have a degree in bio and was a nurse. I have seen first hand how much of a difference positions make in comfort and speed, and I can't imagine guaranteeing being on my back. I actually can't have an epidural, thanks to aforementioned medical issues, so why wouldn't we be using what's available to make it more comfortable?

I'm just afraid of what the doctor might do. But what can they do, really? It is my right to refuse care, right? Does anyone have any experience with this?
 

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I can't speak for your country, but here in the US an OB will not hesitate to go so far as to fake a reason for a csec, insist on a psych consult, or call CPS with "fears" regarding your ability to care for your infant if you dare defy his/her rules.
 

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I don’t imagine that you will have a problem with most practitioners in Australia regarding positions in labour. However, there are always a few bad apples.

Where are you planning to have your baby? Is there a midwifery group practice at your local hospital? Local midwifery consumer groups? Your best bet is to find out what the atmosphere at your intended hospital is like and go from there.

Once you have a practitioner you can talk about your birth needs. And they can talk about any circumstances in which they would ask you to adopt a specific position. Some example I can think of are if you were to have a vacuum or forceps extraction or if the baby wasn’t tolerating a specific position (although it would be very rare that lying on your back would be ideal in that circumstance).

I would not be overly concerned though. The birthing climate in Australia is far from ideal but it is very different from the US.


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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thank God for Australia. WTF is wrong with America. I live in Adelaide, which may be slightly... traditional, as it is in so many things, but I have a number of friends with kids and I'm hoping for the Women's and Children's Hospital. I understand it won't be my choice really.

I saw some pretty nasty things in the US around birth, but my experience wasn't extensive. Doctors are not gods, contrary to popular belief! I mean, if my baby weren't tolerating a position I would definitely change- one reason I'm not up for unassisted childbirth is that I know quite well how long it can be before you realize something is really wrong. But saving lives doesn't justify abusing a parent if she doesn't obey you like the Dear Leader.
 

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The Women’s and Children’s in Adelaide has a midwifery group practice. I would start looking into that now if I were you. The one in my city is very popular and they are not able to keep up with demand at the moment so I would suggest you find out how early you can put your name down. Their website has some information and you could ring up for more details.


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Would a doctor really hassle you about that? I could see if it was an emergency situation. It is good to have a midwife because they at least act as your advocate/intermediary. In my case, it was an emergency and all I wanted was to live through it and my baby survive the birth, end of story, plus I was frozen from the chest down, and there were a ton of monitors etc. attached everywhere. It took all my will to stay calm while turning down the suggestions I HAD to do a cesarean, thankfully I didn't have to labour long and it became a moot point. Maybe in some places or if the midwife and my hubby hadn't been there they might have been more forceful.
 
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