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I am on BP meds. I have been induces 2 times before and this will be my last baby. I so want to go into labor by myself. I told my care giver this the other day and she sorta jokingly pretended not to hear me. I asked her what was considered high enough for them to look at inducing. She said something like 140/90. WHAT????? Now granted my BP was higher than that when I was induced before but with 140/90 I feel like I don't even have a chance. I get those reading a lot even now. It varies throughtout my pregnancy.<br><br>
I am going to do everything in my power to avoid this by taking really good care of myself. I will start walking on my treadmill everyday ect. Before I never did any extra exercise. I am hoping this will make a difference. I am alos taking my son to a naturopath for naet treatments. I plan to utilize her to help me control it as well with herbs or homeopathy.
 

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no, 140/90 is the cutoff for "high" bp - before that it is not even considered high!!<br><br>
have you discussed medications with her? if my BP goes back above 140/90 I will just start back on the meds. aldomet and labetalol are both safe in pregnancy. did you develop pre-eclampsia with either previous pregnancy, or just hypertension? are you hypertensive when not pregnant?<br><br>
I was induced with DD with pressures of 160/100.
 

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I was induced with my first because I developed pre-e late in pregnancy. My readings were going up to 160/120. This was just after 9/11 and my husband is in the military so it probably contributed to it.
 

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My BP was 185/112. I was admitted and induced at 36w1d. I never did get pre-e, just plain old BP trouble. The labetalol did not touch me. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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140/90 is borderline - definitely not "high!" I have had that reading on and off over the years and while it's cause for mild concern (because if it goes higher it's an issue), I've never been medicated or had any issues.<br><br>
I am taking an herbal supplement which seems to have really helped my bp thus far. It's Passionflower Tincture (I found an alcohol-free version through Frontier), and I take it mixed in some pineapple juice to mask the flavor (which isn't horrible, but I'm sensitive to it these days!). Now my lower number is down to a very healthy range! And that's the one that's the biggest concern as far as "disease" type reasons go. The upper number will fluctuate all the time depending on your stress, activity, etc.<br><br>
I was in an ob's office the other day and my bp was 140/72. The nurse said it was fine - that the 140 was "because you're here." And I'm totally sure that was right, as I was a bit stressed as I don't go to ob's very often! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I would definitely be wary of someone wanting to induce at 140/90. Do you have other provider options that you can explore?
 

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um 140/90 in itself isn't high for me during pregnancy.<br><br>
I suppose it may depend on what your "norm" is pre-pregnancy. I was sitting on 135/85 during most of my pregnancy with DS and my caregivers were happy enough.<br><br>
I was induced eventually at 38w with DS as my BP in the last weeks were high and pre-E. I can't remember the top number but I do remember that the bottom number was like 100/110 even after resting. Despite my efforts my BP was going out of control.<br><br>
This eventually led to testing which showed pre-E and the appearance of DS two weeks before his due date.<br><br>
I know that my OB wouldn't not have induced me for BP of 140/90 alone.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>HeatherB</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7916263"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I was in an ob's office the other day and my bp was 140/72. The nurse said it was fine - that the 140 was "because you're here." And I'm totally sure that was right, as I was a bit stressed as I don't go to ob's very often! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"></div>
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this brings up another good point - are you checking your pressures at home? I have a Reli-On automatic cuff from Walmart (yeah I know I know, but it was the consumer reports best pick and only cost $40 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/duck.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Duck"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> and I check my pressures 2-3 times a week. Make sure you have been sitting down for at least 5 minutes first.<br><br>
Also when they check it at the doctor's office, make them let you sit down for a few minutes first - so often they want to check it after you've peed/weighed/hauled yourself into the room and you need a chance to catch your breath.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>HeatherB</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7916263"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am taking an herbal supplement which seems to have really helped my bp thus far. It's Passionflower Tincture (I found an alcohol-free version through Frontier)</div>
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hey do you have any links supporting the use of this in pregnancy? I have been googling it and a few sites recommend it during pregnancy but others say it is a uterine stimulant...
 

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I am currently on labatelol and hctz which is a mild diuretic. I developed hbp with my dd in the last trimester. I have never been pre-e. I was 40 weeks with dd and they said it was time to induce. With ds I think I was 38-39 weeks. I don't remember how high it was but with him I was on medication throughout most of the pregnancy. There were a few months when we had to cut way back becuase it normalized. In fact, I think I remember going off of them. Anyway, they are keeping a close eye on it. I just don't know when to say "no". If that makes any sense. I am with Kaiser. I mean for me, 140/90 isn't all that high. I don't know that they would induce for that but she made me feel like they might. I am going to look into the passionflower. I have heard about this stuff before. I am going to do everything I can to keep it down this time. Unfortunately, it does run rampant in my family.
 

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you could also try this:<br><br>
Juice of half a lemon or lime plus two teaspoons of cream of tartar in a half a cup of water once a day for three days, lowers your blood pressure, if needed, repeat after a break of two days
 

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I had toxemia with the first two and was induced.<br>
The third I had three weeks bed rest for high BP, and I was not induced! I did ask the doc to strip my membranes (and it worked!) when I hit 38 weeks.<br><br>
My goal this time is to not be messed with at all and go into labor naturally. You can do that, even with high BP. Just go on light duties at home and stay calm and low key. Keep the BP down and you can do this naturally.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>thorn</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7916656"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">hey do you have any links supporting the use of this in pregnancy? I have been googling it and a few sites recommend it during pregnancy but others say it is a uterine stimulant...</div>
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The only thing I know about it is that my mw has recommended it in both of the pregnancies I've gone through with her. She's alot more knowledgeable about herbal remedies than some other midwives around here, and I really do trust what she says. Of course, I don't have anything like an irritable uterus, but she has recommended it in the 3rd trimester, too.
 

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my m/w recommended passionflower tincture when my bp crept up from my baseline at 37 weeks. i got some in alcohol.<br><br>
other things she recommended - drinking enough water (2L/day), eating enough protein, bathing in hops, and getting regular light exercise.<br><br>
my first pregnancy i think i had readings up to 150/95, also at 37 weeks, with spilling some proteins... but with partial bedrest rest and sufficient protein it came down again by 38 weeks, protein in urine/blood tests improved, and i awaited natural labor, though i did have to ask for postponement of scheduled inductions twice. my bp was normal during labor and all was well with the baby.
 

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Taken, in part, from the article "Eat to Beat Pregnancy Complications, the right diet can help you have a healthier pregnancy" by Debbi Donovan, IBCLC<br><br><i>Dr. Tom Brewer's name may not be familiar to you. He isn't in the public eye much anymore. But Dr. Brewer, a pioneer in the field of nutrition and pregnancy, has spent the past 47 years of his life working as a trained obstetrician, counseling women in both research and clinical settings during their pregnancies. He has fought a lifelong -- and uphill -- battle to conquer disorders of pregnancy and complications of birth, by doing something as simple as making it his business to see that pregnant moms are properly nourished.<br><br>
Over the past five decades, Dr. Brewer has been frustrated by the failure on the part of health care providers to recognize the important role played by good nutrition during pregnancy and, moreover, to make this an important part of their practice, counseling pregnant mothers in the importance of good nutrition. Brewer believes that it is crucial that pregnant women eat a healthful, balanced diet every day during their pregnancy. Rarely does a pregnant woman get asked by her obstetrician what she is eating. Though they usually take an otherwise complete history, this important part of the puzzle is ignored. Why is one of the simplest solutions (like a good, balanced diet) often ignored and ultimately forgotten?<br><br>
5. How about salting my foods to taste -- will it cause my blood pressure to rise? On the contrary, salting foods to taste is very important in pregnancy. During pregnancy, blood volume must increase 40 to 50 percent. The goal of the Brewer Diet (2600 calories, 120 grams of protein, salt to taste, and unrestricted weight gain) is to provide you with the foods and nutrients necessary to help with this protective increase. It is normal to have swelling in late pregnancy while following a good diet. Extra water protects in case of excessive bleeding after the birth, and helps to protect the new mother from going into shock.</i><br><br>
Another supportive resource is from Anne Frye’s lab work book, in which she states that salt should NOT be restricted. A pregnant woman’s desire for salt is the best gauge of how much her body needs. In the pregnant state, salt attracts fluid out of the tissues and into circulation. It is not possible for the normal pregnant woman to eat too much salt, whatever is not needed will be excreted by the kidneys. This needs to be mentioned since many women are told to restrict salt by a friend or a doctor. Even if all other nutrients are adequate, salt restriction alone can cause elevated blood pressure and edema (swelling). Just two weeks of moderate salt intake cause the blood volume to begin to fall. This reflects an imbalance in the albumin/sodium ratio in the bloodstream, allowing fluid to seep out of the circulation into the surrounding tissues.<br><br>
As a midwife assistant, I would also suggest, before your prenantal appointments, taking Rescue Remedy, drink Chammomile tea, and ask to have your blood pressure "read" while lying on your left side. BP readings are almost always lower when lying down, especially in a pregnant momma!
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">: to the above.<br><br>
The brewer diet can really help. I did it with DD. And I'm doing it again. I found when I strayed from the diet I started having problems (higher BP, swelling) but getting back on it made the BP go down and the swelling go back to normal.<br><br>
I was going to mention the salt thing but the above post did it much better than I can. I found salt to be THE best way to control swelling. For example, my feet would start to swell and get uncomfortable in the afternoon so I would eat some salty nits or a few salty crackers. Swelling would go down in an hour or so.
 
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