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Discussion Starter #1
I got a note back the other day that my 2nd grade daughter had taken a test called OLSAT. I have no idea what the test is and didn't know she would be taking it. I didn't understand the results that were given either. The main number she got was 134. What does this mean? Is it likely to get her into the gifted program? I was told she would be in it this school year before she even took this test, but then budget cuts made them push back starting the gifted program until 3rd grade. I know she would like to have extra activities so I would like her to be in the program. She said her teacher told her she did really well on it, but that isn't much to go on either. I think she's gifted, but not profoundly gifted, more like moderately to highly gifted or there abouts.<br><br>
Thanks!
 

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It's the Otis Lennon School Ability Test. It's an assessment of cognitive ability, abstract thinking and reasoning. It uses multiple choice and it's often given in a group setting, rather than during individual assessment with a psychologist. So it's considered less accurate and more prone to problems than other IQ assessments like the Stanford-Binet or WISC IV or other tests. I'm not too familiar with it, but I imagine the ceiling effect would be significant with this kind of test. By that, I mean that the ceiling (upper limit of the questions) may be too low, so it doesn't accurately measure the extent of IQ for some children.<br><br>
I believe a score of 134 on the OLSAT is in the top 2 percentile. Whether this meets the criteria for a special program depends on that program's requirements. Different rules apply in different regions and schools. Do you know what the admission criteria is for your school's gifted program? For many, it's 98th percentile, but it could be higher - 99th - or even lower (95th or lower).<br><br>
The next step is to ask for a copy of the report and review it. Once you are confident you understand it, ask for a meeting with the school so you can discuss next steps. Even if there is no special class or pull out program, it sounds like the school should be providing some accommodations for your dd.<br><br>
BTW, I'm a little surprised that the school could perform an assessment without your consent. You might want to discuss their communication and information policies too, while you're at it.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I was surprised I didn't know about this test ahead of time too. I have no idea and it is something I want to ask them about. Really just a note sent home in her backpack would have been enough for me.<br><br>
They're really pretty good about accommodating her already. For instance, they do these AR tests with books they read, and the 2nd grade list of books was just way too easy, so they on their own gave her a list from the 4th grade class and she reads those books and does those tests. Also, one of the 4th grade classes had a science project they were working on at one point and the teacher arranged it so she could go to that class during that project to work on it too. The teachers and principal are great. The only complaint I have is the librarian, who doesn't like kids to get books out of their grade level. But the teacher has intervened there for me.<br><br>
Thank you for the info!
 

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My son took the OLSAT for the NYC board of ed gifted program. My understanding is that its a test specifically designed as a screening tool and one which does not require a professional psychologist to administer it.<br><br>
He was in a group and had to fill in bubbles (he is 5 and had literally never done this before I gave him the "practice" test they provided). I'd heard from multiple sources that its not a "good" test. And in NYC at least, there is RAMPANT prepping, and its considered pretty "preppable". Nevertheless, he got almost exactly the same score as he did on the WPPSI-III which is an individually administered test given by a professional psychologist. He hit ceilings on the same sorts of things (visual-spatial) and got almost the same scores overall. (though if we'd prepped, perhaps he would have gone higher, it wouldn't have mattered b/c for that program they don't differentiate w/in percentile ranks, and he was in the 99th).<br><br>
I imagine being in the top 2% will get your daughter into the G&T program, regardless of its accuracy. But its so weird that they did it w/out informing you first. I would want to ask about that and would at least request you are informed of what sorts of assessments they are doing on your daughter!
 
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