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I hear people here at MDC saying that soy isn't all that good. What is so bad about it besides the fact that those who are sensitive to cow's milk might also have a sensitivity to soy. I have heard something about hormones but I don't really understand too much about it. Any opinions/facts will be appreciated. TIA.

BTW, I did try to search for "soy" but because it is only 3 letters long it doesn't make the cut for a search term. Sorry if this is a repeated question.
 

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I have a similar question....

My DH is having a hard time digesting soy (I'm vegetarian, he's not...but he's willing to try just about any veggie meal I cook).

I'm just starting to get really good at cooking with tofu and now he can't eat it
and I'm hearing more about it not being so good for you.

I would love to hear more about soy.

~Erin


Oh and about the search I think that if you put a * after soy you can search for three letter words. I tried that yesterday when I needed info about BEE stings and it seemed to work.
 

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From the research I have done, this is what I have found:

Soy is high in natural estrogens so there is controversy about people eating too much - especially when it is used in baby formulas they effect on the child is not known.

Also, unfermented soy is high in phytic acid which can leach minerals like calcium and zinc from your body.

That's the bad side. The good side is that it is a good source of protein and calcium and other nutrieints.

My personal opinion is that anything - included soy - in moderation is good. We eat tofu, tempeh, miso, use soymilk on cereal or cooking but I try not to give the kids more than one serving a day.

And yes, soy is allergenic to some people. Most legumes are not digested that easily but tofu is an easy-to-digest form of soy.

Hoep that helps a little.
 

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Aside from all that, soy can inhibit the thyroid. I ended up with hypothyroid after being a vegan for 12 years and I didn't even use soymilk or processed soy (I was macrobiotic vegan) so I avoid it like the plague (except for small amounts of tamari and miso) you just never know if your system is going tobe sensitive to the hormone like effects. I could go on and on about this subject, but I've noticed that people take it very personally and conversations can get quite volatile.
 

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i experienced heart palpitations from eating soy. i'm also on the bandwagon against it and it scares me that my period got shorter when i was eating a lot of it. another strange thing that has happened that i've noticed just in the past 2 weeks ( i am nursing my 3 year old) is that i have started to have a let-down again (WHAT?! she's three years old!) and this is bizarre but part of me thinks it is because i'm completely off soy. i also think there is no telling what it can do hormonally and i do not let my dd eat any soy now.
 

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Elainie - I am interested in what you said about soying making you hypothyroid. I became hypothyroid after the birth of my second child and I attributed it to that. I was vegan for 10 years and still eat a very plant based diet with some soy.

How do you know it was the soy that caused the problem? I have been doing a lot of research and haven't found soy products as a cure through I have read about veggies from the cabbage family (broccoli, etc.) inhibiting thyroid activity.
 

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Cathe, I was first alerted to the other side of soy by some raw food vegan friends (actually a well known author) many many years ago. At that time I was just coming off my macrobitoic diet and after severasl months I had my blood checked. My TSH had dropped from 46 down to 10 which was pretty good for me. In the months and years after it remained lower (around 6 or lower) but whenever I get pregnant my TSH levels go up and I take Armour thyroid, homeopathics and herbs to bring it down to levels of below 2.

Virgin Coconut oil (which I've been using for the past 8-9 years ) has helped me . We didn't even start using it for that reason but again it was suggested by our raw vegan friends as a safe fat to use in cooking.

Here's an article I found on the net:

[Admin note: Article removed due to copyright violation. Please read our copyright thread in the Rules and Guidelines board. You may place a link to the article if you wish but not the full article. ~Cynthia]
 

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I forgot to mention that hypothyroid was pretty common among women in the macrobiotic community I lived in years ago in Boston. My dh's ex-wife had it pretty bad but corrected her diet and it's under control as she says.

None of these women including myself started out hypothyroid or had a history of it in their families.
 

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Thanks ELanie. I appreciate you getting me that info.
 

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I just stumbled upon this thread...and this topic and it's kind of disturbing to me.

DH and I eat a LOT of soy products probably on a daily basis and have been since we've been kids. We eat mostly Korean foods, including tofu, fermented soybean paste, soy sauce, cooked soybeans, and probably other stuff that I can't think of right now. DS, who's 18 mo, has had bits and pieces of tofu and probably tastes of soy sauce on foods. I read some info on some of the linked sites but I couldn't quite capture the essence of the dangers/safe amounts/symptoms of problems. If someone could explain those I would really appreciate it.

TIA!
 

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...here is the most comprehensive piece I've read on the issue:

Written in part by my new hero Sally Fallon (Nourisishing Traditions)

http://www.rheumatic.org/soy.htm

"Only Fermented Soy Products Are Safe
To summarize, traditional fermented soy products such as miso, natto and tempeh, which are usually made with organically grown soybeans, have a long history of use that is generally beneficial when combined with other elements of the Oriental diet including rice, sea foods, fish broth, organ meats and fermented vegetables. The value of precipitated soybean products is problematical, especially when they form the major source of protein in the diet. Modern soy products including soy milks and artificial meat and dairy products made from soy protein isolate and textured vegetable protein are new to the diet and pose a number of serious problems. "

As with many dietary issues the complications begin when the food product is ripped from its cultural context.

Let food be your medicine and medicine be your food,

(Hippocrates)

Ray
 

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...the more I read about the soy the more I say...

...SOY.....JUST SAY NO! (at least for a little while).

I noticed that you're hypothyroid.

I don't know if your veganism allows fish but here's something from Sally Fallon's "Nourishing Traditions"

"Fish stock, made from the carcasses and heads of fish, is especially rich in minerals including all-important iodine. Even more important, stock made from the heads, and therefore the thyroid glands of the fish, supplies thyroid hormone and other substances that nourish the thyroid gland....
....at least 40% of all Americans suffer from a deficiency of the thyroid gland with its accompanying symptoms of fatigue, weight gain, frequent colds and flu, inability to concentrate, depression and a host of more serious complications like heart disease and cancer."

I'll be looking more closely at this issue. My wife's mother is hypothyroid and takes medication. To what extent my wife might be in line for this problem I'm not sure.

Unfortunately she really can't stand fish--- so I'll have to find other nutritional options.

Procreate, Lactate, Disseminate!

Ray
 

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That was a really interesting article. I think I'll stick to my fermented soybean paste.

In the article it said that perhaps the younger Japanese generation was taller because they drink milk. I assume milk is referring to cow's milk? Is that because cow's milk makes one taller? Or that it's replacing some of the soy in their diets? Both? I'm really curious about this because neither my DH or I are milk drinkers of any kind) and DS has not been interested either - except for breastmilk of course! Would it be in DS's best interest to drink cow's milk? I felt that the article leaned towards saying that Asians are shorter/smaller because their diets are deficient, unlike Americans' diets. But that would mean that if Asians ate what Americans eat, they would be taller.

Any thoughts?
 
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