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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
We just moved into a new home, new to us, and the kitchen has no shelf liners on it. I have always put shelf liners on shelves. My mom always did this. I guess I just assumed it kept the wooden shelves from getting dinged and knicked and it is easier to wipe clean than wood. But, now I am wondering, is this right or am I just stuck in old fashioned homemaking land?

What is the purpose of shelf liner?
 

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Shelf liners always feel "cleaner" to me. We just moved into a new home, too, and we put in shelf liners in our kitchen and bathrooms. It seems like if food in the kitchen gets spilled on the wooden shelves it just soaks in and is hard to get really clean, but wipes right up with a shelf liner. Same thing in the bathroom with liquid soaps or lotions.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That is my opinion, too. Shelf liner seems a bit antiquated - I mean my grandmothers used it. But, I guess it really does serve a purpose. Surprising to know that a simple product like that is still around after so many years.
 

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It seems as if our grandmothers and grandfathers always found something that would cost less to replace to protect those things that would cost more or be more difficult to replace. For example, tablecloths to protect the wood table top, wainscoting to protect the plaster wall, shelf paper to protect the shelf surface, doilies to protect upholstered furniture, aprons to protect cloths, etc. etc. Makes sense if you think about it: it is cheaper and easier to wash an apron rather than a whole outfit and it is cheaper and easier to clean/replace the shelf liner rather than make a new wood shelf.
 
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