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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have this friend who goes to these 'slow food' meetings and it seems like it's nothing more than eating locally, but then again, I haven't been to any meetings....Does anyone belong to this movement towards eating 'slow food'? How differently is this from how you used to eat? Is it more or less expensive than conventional or fast eating? Is it just about eating foods that require less transportation? Or is this just like using CSA's and local farmer's markets - therefore it's just a fancy name for what people have been doing...

thanks!
 

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I think it's more than eating locally... it's also about getting away from convenience foods, microwaves, etc. Slowing down to eat.... to savor a meal, companions, etc.
 

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For me, I use the terms slow food and local food almost interchangeably. I don't know if the following explanation is technically what slow food is supposed to me but this is what I take it as.

We started making a real effort to eat locally/slowly. The benefits I see are: less transport or the food saving on fuel costs/emissions, fresher and healthier food b/c it was not 'bred for transport', supporting your local small farmers and economy, and supporting sustainable ag-practices. It's getting to know where and who your food comes from.

We recently joined out local CSA. I've found that prices on about half of the items are comparable to the organics in the grocery store, while some of the items are a bit more expensive. In the summer, we grow our own veggie garden and supplement with produce from the farmers market. We've also been trying to find direct sources of different local foods to offset the co-op fees.

I also thin a big part of slow-food is eating what is in season. Trying to eat what nature has to offer when it has to offer or preserving it (canning, freezing) to be enjoyed later.

We are making small steps and are no-where near where we ideally like to be with our eating. We did make a conscious effort to forgo fresh tomatoes in winter, unless they are coming from a local greenhouse. On the other hand, coffee is not grown anywhere around here and for now it is something we deem a necessity so we buy organic/fair trade. baby steps
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
It's not about microwaves or anything like that. It's about reclaiming real food and local food heritage.
Actually, in the slow food book I do have (granted it's probably 10 years old or so), it does mention microwaves as being part of the death of real meals and such... because all people did was heat up TV dinners and such. Too often, microwaves are used to heat up a meal in a box... which is not what the movement is about.
 

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I think its more about consuming whole foods, not something that used to be part of a food once upon a time.

We eat mostly local foods, grow and preserve our own produce, and try to just know where our food comes from, what it really is.

Quote:
We did make a conscious effort to forgo fresh tomatoes in winter, unless they are coming from a local greenhouse.
I thought it would be hard not eating tomatoes out of season, but so far, its not. I just keep thinking about how good my tomatoes were compared to the grocery store ones.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by Alyantavid View Post

I thought it would be hard not eating tomatoes out of season, but so far, its not. I just keep thinking about how good my tomatoes were compared to the grocery store ones.
It is really not hard at all! I look at the tomato in the grocery store and they do not look good AT ALL! I don have withdrawls for my juicy heirlooms already. I can almost taste it....


OT but this was the first year I grew extra tomatoes to make sauce, paste, etc. I couldn't believe how many tomatoes it takes for a jar of sauce. I am doubling or tripling the amount I grow next year.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
Began in Italy as a revolt against a McDonalds opening near The Spanish Steps.
OT: Sadly enough I was taken to this said McD's when I was younger and living in Italy...they serve spaghetti with meatballs and wine...no fries
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
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Originally Posted by MidnightCommando View Post
fresher and healthier food b/c it was not 'bred for transport'
ewe...that just turns my stomach.
I just think about how horrible the lives of the animals are being raised for food and I just can't even purchase it. We've cut down on meat consumption tons since buying local/organic is very expensive....stinks, but what are you ganna do...
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MommyHawk View Post
OT: Sadly enough I was taken to this said McD's when I was younger and living in Italy...they serve spaghetti with meatballs and wine...no fries
Really? I went there in late 88 or early 89, and I remember it being decorated differently... but I could swear I had normal McDonald's food. Beer and wine was normal in all of the European McDonald's... but the ones I visited (sadly, a few.. Zurich, Rome, and Paris) all had typical McDonald's hamburgers and frieds.

That's sort of funny if they brought the American invention of Spaghetti and Meatballs back to Italy. I'd expect it to fail miserably, though.
 

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Spag & Meatballs was actually an Italian-American invention. Lidia (born and raised in Italy) of Lidia's Kitchen (chef, restuarant owner and awesome PBS TV show hostess) wrote about embracing these sorts of evolving dishes because it combined what was available to new Italian immigrants in the US, with recipes from their homelands.

She is a spag & meatball fan.
:

"I don't remember having spaghetti and meatballs as a child at home; we had polpette, which had the shape of crab cakes. Spaghetti and meatballs, on the other hand, is a big Italian American dish, a cuisine born out of the early Italian immigrants adapting to the New World." -Lidia Matticchio Bastianich

She writes about this in Lidia's Italian-American Kitchen. Think of it as Fusion food.
 

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I recently joined our local Slow Food convivium and two other aspects that are on the website, but not mentioned as much here -- community and bringing back a number of "heirloom" crops that aren't as cooperative as the ones that can become GMOs, etc. There's a list at slowfoodusa.org. The community piece is pretty fun with community dinners, potlucks, farm dinners, etc. Getting to know our local farmers and cooks and restaurant owners has been fun! There's a New Year's Even dinner in the works for our group and I'm thrilled because our kids are included, and have been at a few of the events. We haven't found that to be the case with several of the other groups we've tried to be a part of
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by UUMom View Post
Began in Italy as a revolt against a McDonalds opening near The Spanish Steps.

www.slowfood.com

Is now an international movement.

This is the US link--

www.slowfoodusa.org

It's not about microwaves or anything like that. It's about reclaiming real food and local food heritage.

I wish McDonalds would actually consider their locations beyond profitablility. The spanish steps are beautiful. the thought of them smelling like a french fryer..well, saddens me.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by MidnightCommando View Post
It is really not hard at all! I look at the tomato in the grocery store and they do not look good AT ALL! I don have withdrawls for my juicy heirlooms already. I can almost taste it....


OT but this was the first year I grew extra tomatoes to make sauce, paste, etc. I couldn't believe how many tomatoes it takes for a jar of sauce. I am doubling or tripling the amount I grow next year.
I haven't even slowed down long enough to look at the tomatoes in the store! I'm doing so many more next year too. I have quite a few frozen still but they definitely won't last until next summer.

Right now, I really wish I lived somewhere with a longer growing season. Especially with all the snow!
 
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