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Questioned posed by 3, almost 4 y/o ds at lunch today. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/yikes2.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yikes">:<br><br>
I looked at him and repeated it back, hoping he'd say, "where are my rescue heroes"? He repeated the same inquiry. I told him we will look it up.<br><br>
So it goes....
 

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Same as water, only closer.. no wait! Further apart. I think. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">
 

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It crystallizes. But it's still two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen in each molecule.<br><br>
I can't wait until DD starts asking questions like that. It's going to be so much fun!!!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ravin</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It crystallizes. But it's still two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen in each molecule.<br><br>
I can't wait until DD starts asking questions like that. It's going to be so much fun!!!</div>
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Thanks everyone! Geez, I didn't expect so many real answers! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I didn't take chemistry (ever) and although I enjoy learning about it, I don't have the answers to some of those questions at the tip of my tongue.<br><br>
I do love this age, and I love the freedom home learning gives us! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/clap.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="clap"> for DS knowing what an atom is
 

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TiredX2, we have been discussing atoms with dd recently and it is so wonderful what the kids pick up. Does anyone have any book/ resource ideas for early chemistry learning? Since it isn't my strong point, something that helps me would be greatly appreciated. TIA!
 

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We have a book called <a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2Fexec%2Fobidos%2Ftg%2Fdetail%2F-%2F1884822673%2Fqid%3D1087749361%2Fsr%3D8-1%2Fref%3Dsr_8_xs_ap_i1_xgl14%2F002-4357895-5692813%3Fv%3Dglance%26s%3Dbooks%26n%3D507846" target="_blank">365 Science Experiments</a> to do at Home, and they are mostly really simple & easy, good for younger kids, plus it explains things reeeeeeally simply. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
And it's FUN!
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Ravin</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">It crystallizes. But it's still two atoms of hydrogen and one of oxygen in each molecule.<br><br>
I can't wait until DD starts asking questions like that. It's going to be so much fun!!!</div>
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LOL You sound just like me! I am a Biology/Chemisty major and I just love this stuff! My kids (ages 2 and 6) know a LOT about chemistry too, I dig it when girls are into this stuff because not many are. There are a lot of good childrens books on chemistry and many ways you can incorporat chemisty into everyday life, since chemistry IS life.<br><br>
For the OP, you could also use this question to talk about polar and nonpolar molecules, also the states of matter (gas, liquid, solid), chemical vs physical changes, basic things like that. Chemistry is EVERYTHING! One fun topic if they are interested is what happens to something when it is "gone" (either dead animal, where does the steam from water go, what happens when a leaf burns, etc) because all atoms are constantly recycled and atoms are never destroyed. That is a really fascinating thing if you think about it.<br><br>
Another fun "mystery" question I asked my 6 year old was what is inside those bubbles when water is boiling? (hint: water in gas form), a lot of times kids (well and adults...lol) think it is just air. Maybe have them look it up online to find out or something to figure out the "mystery". I do a lot of fun things like that with my 6 year old and she loves it and has no idea she is learning...lol<br><br>
Marilyn
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Andrea, thank you for the book recc. I know I have seen that one around.<br><br>
Marilyn, can you give me some book titles suitable for a 3 and an 8 y/o?<br>
Thanks!
 

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Fun site for science ideas -- <a href="http://www.steelcreek.com/workshopindex.htm" target="_blank">www.steelcreek.com/workshopindex.htm</a><br><br>
Our library has a book entitled Adventures With Atoms and Molecules that has all sorts of chemistry experiments. Once you get to that section, though, you can browse for other books. Janice VanCleave has some nice beginning books for young experimenters (I'm not a big fan of her books for older kids, but I like the ones for little kids). And there are all sorts of colorful kitchen-science-type books that will have you mixing up slime/polymers, making volcanoes out of vinegar and baking soda, boiling red cabbage to make pH indicators, etc.<br><br>
I also like to browse the Michael Olaf catalog to see what books they recommend for kids -- <a href="http://www.michaelolaf.com" target="_blank">www.michaelolaf.com</a> -- plus they have all sorts of other cool stuff to play with.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks Queen Gwen! I just signed up for the tutorial at her site. She has a lot of good information.<br><br>
I am feeling a lot better after discussing this and locating some resources. Thanks everyone <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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:LOL :LOL :LOL We should get your 3 yo together with my 3 yo. They'd have a blast. Luckily, for me, he isn't into chemistry yet. But his geo-sciences questions are so much beyond me already that I feel like I live on the internet (when he actually pauses long enough for me to look something up). We're currently into volcanoes, tectonic plates, gases causing eruptions. Oh and dinosaurs - who's a carnivore, herbivore, how'd each defend themselves, who would attack who, who's faster. Yikes! And of course dinosaurs lead to theories of evolution and extinction <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"> I don't know about you , but I may need to take some college classes to get through the 4 yo questions <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/love.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="love">
 

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:LOL I know! It is scary and exciting at the same time. He also asks a lot of the "where was I before I was here?" kind of thing. I love this age, I just didn't think I would be outsmarted so soon! :LOL<br><br>
There is another thread, of course I can't link it, on Science and Queen Gwen posted a site for science activities. The woman who authors the site offers a tutorial on "How to Teach Science". I just signed up for it <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
I'll go find it and edit it back in.<br><br><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/duh.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="duh"> It's right above here in this thread! The steelcreek site.
 

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See this is why homeschooling just rocks. Most public schools are quite sexist in how they teach, especially science and math. I used to be PETRIFIED of both science and math and though that, like a lot of girls do, that I have an "literary" braing and not a "science/math" brain....what bullsh*t that is! My mom took us out of school in the 80's to homeschool me and my bro and sis because she got so tired of us being stupid!<br><br>
It took me many many years to deprogram myself from all that garbage and I am now a Biology and Chemistry major (and Women's Studies minor)! I never in my life thought that that would be a subjects I could first even be good at and second even enjoy. I will not submit my girls to that same crap I went through. I see so many women even at my college who feel they are not smart enough or just can't do science and math and it makes me so upset.<br><br>
My girls just think talking about things like chemistry (and they are only 2 and 6 and they know quite a bit I am proud to say), that math is fun is normal, they don't realize that most girls are scared of it and I hope to keep it that way for quite some time.<br><br>
Ok, sorry for the semi-rant, but I just wanted to talk about that. I think all you moms are great!<br><br>
**edited to add, sorry about the grammer and spelling, but I am to tired right now to go back and fix it....lol**
 

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<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
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Slow ones! :LOL:<br><br>
When I homeschooled my oldest, we took a glass jar, filled it with water, screwed the top on it and PUT IT IN A PLASTIC SHOPPING BAG, TYING THE HANDLES TOGETHER, and then put it in the freezer. Of course, the glass broke, so we carefully took it out of the freezer, and knew that the atoms not only had slowed down their activity because they were cold, but they had e-x-a-n-d-e-d also. We put rubbing alcohol in the freezer because it looks like water, but it is not water, and it does NOT freeze since it has a far lower freezing temperature...you can do this with hydrogen peroxide which has an extra oxygen atom in the molecule and compare the results or with salt water which alos has a lower freezing temperature.<br><br>
In the classroom I used a graduated cylinder to show the actual rise in volume of the liquid -vs- frozen water. We also took a vote to decide what the water would do and wrote predictions on paper. This was third grade.
 
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