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I have a husky/shepard mix. She is almost 10 years old, so she's mellowed out a lot. She is very good with my 20 mo. niece, who stepped on her once and was greeted with a small bark, but other than that the dog tolerates and even likes her hugs and kisses and face rubs. Sometimes the dog lie behind the sofa to have quiet time and then my niece will got sit beside her and pet her.

Majestic

Scared of thunder

My sister owned a Rottie, may she rest in peace, who was an angel, and loved to be petted and hugged by my niece. Of course, she was old when my niece was born, so that might have had something to do with the temperment.
 

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We have an adult Basset Hound we got this spring as a rescue dog. He's fat and lazy and a wonderful dog, but certainly not for everyone.

He sheds almost as much as our lab did, and the SLOBBER! Sometimes he shakes his head with a good mouthful of slobber and it gets on everything - even the ceiling, once. He is wonderful with my (older) kids, but absolutely can't be trusted off leash because if he gets a scent he runs with it. He took off so fast once that I dropped the leash, and the only thing that saved us was that he was so fat he couldn't run fast for very long.

Previously we had a Lab, and he was a wonderful dog too, but her puppyhood was a nightmare! Lab tails are also right about face level with a toddler, and can really sting.

Personally, I would not have a new dog and a toddler at the same time.
 

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First I'd like to applaud you for not just running out and getting the first "cute" dog you see and putting some thought into getting a dog, but I don't know that this question (at least the way its worded) would be the right approach to leading you to the correct dog for your family. If I were you I would take a step back and take a look at your life style, research a few breeds that appeal to you and then maybe get feedback from people that own the type of dogs you are interested in. Your lifestyle, the environment, climate etc should greatly impact what type of breed you obtain, not the type other people have.

Make a list of your wants (before looking at photos of breeds) and go from there....for example if you live on a lake or near water you may want to look into labs or other dogs that swim (though these are nice dogs even if you don't live near water). Do you live in apt or own a house, do you have a large yard, will you need to go to dog parks, if so have you visited them? How much exercise will the dog get vs what they need. Do you want a small, med or large breed dog? Do you want a dog that sheds? Do you want one that needs to be groomed regularly (I'm talking clipped, not just brushed regularly). Are you an active family that is outdoors alot or do you spend most of your time indoors?

I hope I don't sound too harsh, but I volunteer for a rescue and I always try to advocate research, research and more research before making such a committment.

And to answer your question, we have a black lab and a boxer. Both of which are great with my 14 month old daughter. We are even fostering a boxer at the moment and she is terrific with my daughter as well. The lab was my dog of choice 7 years ago because I lived on a river, had children in my home frequently and they make a nice "family" pet. On the negative side he sheds IMMENSLY! I fell in love with the boxer breed when a friend introduced me to his, after looking into the breed we found they would fit our current lifestyle perfectly and knew at the time we would be having children of our own soon, so "good with children" was a must. We no longer live on the river, but own a home with a huge fenced in yard and boxers are terrific with children and shed minimally. The boxer is a high energy breed (though once properly exercised make the best couch potatoes
) and doesn't always do well home alone for long periods of time (though some are ok), which we are only gone typically no more than 4-5 hours a day.
 

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I have a 2 year old dd and we have a golden retriever (5) and a chocolate lab (1). Both shed ALOT and have high exercise needs but they are both sweethearts and are very good with dd. The lab is the most patient though and he seems to have a really firm connection to dd, though it may just be that he is kinda growing up with her since we got him when she was 11 months old. They are good about dd hugging them and kissing them and they both watch over her and the rest of the family.
 

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I have a smooth coat collie. She's been fabulous with our girls. She was supposed to be my second dd, but then we got pg w/our other dd.


We chose a collie because I love the fact that they are well-known for being excellent family dogs... AWESOME with kids. A collie is protective, but a collie's way of protecting is to put himself between his charge and the perceived threat. I like that because while I do want my dog to be protective of my kids, I certainly didn't want a dog who might decide to attack someone.

I chose a smooth coat because I could not see myself brushing any more hair every day!

Collies are herding dogs & that means that she's happiest when all of her sheep are together... otherwise, she's always pacing around, trying to get us all where we're supposed to be.

We love our girl... she's a fabulous dog for our family.
 

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Red heeler. He's heeler #3 that I've owned, and I like them the best so far-though the others weren't much in comparison (lab/golden retreiver X that was dumb, Rottweiler (favorite dog breed #2-don't know if he's representative or not) and a kelpie/border collie mix that was so timid you couldn't do anything with her. At all.

KD is smart, eager to please, good w/ kids (well other peoples kids, so hopefully my own too!), doesn't need to be babysit, ie on the weekends he's outside in the (unfenced) yard (we live in the country on 4 acres) and he knows to stay "home" within those 4 acres w/ no trouble at all. Ever. Good watch dog. My only complaint is with his hair-he sheds constantly-though I think if I got him on RAW food that would quit....can't get my hubby on board with that though.....but I do feed him as much raw stuff as I can afford for now after dh is gone to work...
shouldn't be sneaky but if he won't listen, well, then,


He was pretty hyperactive in his younger days-not destructive, just wanted to play ball all the time. You could not wear him out. (Unless you took a 4 mile ride at a fair pace on a horse..but who has time for that everyday?)

HTH
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
I'm getting some great input THANKS


The research we have done, a mix is the way to go for us. We're in Alaska and have a lot of weather issues to consider.

mom2olivia , we have done all that you have sugested, I wanted some personal experiences to go with our idea of providing a good home to a doggie
:

Thaks for sharing stories
 

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We have your basic shelter mix
she's mostly shepard, we think some lab and a few other things thrown in.

We got her as a puppy we went to the shelter many times, did the "puppy tests" and she is really great, a little hyper but she's still not quite two, so I'm hoping in a few years she'll settle down.
 

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we have an 8 yr male Jack Russell Terrier-by far my favorite doggie breed so far (have also had Bouviers, Siberian Huskies, German Shepherds, Goldens and a Chesapeake Bay Retriever.) I love that he's a big dog in a small dog's body, and don't think I'll ever have another big dog after him. He's so loving, smart, and fun-have never had some of the negative problems you hear some JRT owners having. They do need lots of exercise and do need training, otherwise you'll have a problem. Oh, and they shed-regardless of what type of coat they have (smooth or rough.) They also don't tolerate being handled roughly, so it was a bit of a challenge with him when my daughters were younger. He absolutely adores my oldest now-follows her everywhere and sleeps with her, and knows all her secrets.
He's just now starting to be more affectionate toward our toddler-and she's really good about being gentle with him. And they are the cutest puppies!

http://i56.photobucket.com/albums/g1...6/DSCN8746.jpg
 

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I posted this on the TAO that got closed.

We have an adorable 10 year old Sheltie mix that we got as a puppy from a dumb friend of my brother's. He thought he could keep her in his no-pets apartment.


Our dog is half Sheltie but we don't know what the other part is. Could be Corgi because she's very low to the ground. Could be Dauschund because she has the sloping forehead. Whatever her true mix is our dog is super dog. She is very good with people. She'll bark at strangers when we're not around. But when people come to the house for parties and such she's very friendly. She's good with DD (although I never leave the two of them alone. It's not our dog. I'm distrustful of what DD might do to the dog!
). She knows about 20 words and 7 commands. Most of the words she understands she picked up on her own. I think the Sheltie (Shetland Sheepdog) is strong in her and they are supposed to be very intelligent dogs. Shelties look like small Collies. That's what our dog looks like. She sheds a lot. That's the downside. We had to get a Dyson vaccum to remove the pet hair. The Dyson has been awesome. I don't see the pet hair on the carpet anymore.

I'm not sure I would get a new dog if DD was a toddler.
We had our dog for a decade so she was part of the family and we weren't about to get rid of her. However, DD doesn't know how to treat a dog. She has a tendency to pull on the fur, yank, hit, pinch. It's all normal for a toddler but hurtful to a dog. We're lucky that ours is pretty easy-going and older. She generally moves away from DD and avoids her knowing what she's capable of.


When I was growing up we had a pure breed German Shepard. A gorgeous dog and smart as they come. She was an outside dog who was a wonderful guard dog and fanastic companion animal. Most people wouldn't consider a German Shepard a good family dog I'm sure but ours was as gentle as a Golden Retriever. I still miss her even though she passed away nearly 26 years ago.

There are so many wonderful dogs at the animal shelters. Many of them would be good family dogs. Please consider adopting from a shelter esp a no-kill shelter.
 

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We have 2 dogs.

The yellow lab is a watch dog for the girls. She goes where they do. And if your a stranger don't touch the girls or make any fast moves towards them even if you can see anywhere around, she doesn't like it


The yorkie is mine but he isn't your typical lap dog. He spends the days outside with the lab on his own accord.

They sleep with the girls at night
:
 

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Augie my love is half Australian Shepherd, and half black & tan Coonhound. SO he has long hair, a HUGE nose, and big floppy ears. He is such a doll.
My DH got him long before we met, and Augie is now about 13 or so. He was finally not so hyper at around 11 or so, not sure if thats a hound thing or an Aussie thing, but BOY was he a spazzy baby.
: He does drool muchly, loves to talk (bark) and sing (howl) and just generally loves attention.

I don't really know how he is around kids. He's really used to just DH and myself, as we dont' have kids yet and most of our friends kids are older (8 and up) so I've really never seen him around little ones. I think he's be fine now - at this point he's a wee bit senile, and just sort of oblivious to the world around him sometimes.
He is fine with the cats, in fact, the only reason we keep the cats away from him is because one of my cats *hates* dogs with a passion, and has never (5 years now) quite gotten used to having him around. It's really for his own safety, as I'm quite sure this cat could hold her own.


About the only thing I'd caution people on with a dog like Augie is he needs a ton of grooming to keep him untangled (long aussie hair, just like his "sister" that we used to have, a purebred Aussie) and he drools like a fiend, and howls along with sirens and other dogs (hound thing) and while his eyesight isn't that great, not is his hearing (an age thing) his nose is still beyond fantastic, nearly bionic! (hound thing) so you have to be a wee bit extra cautious about things that smell good to doggies, like kitty litter and garbage and such.

So yeah, he's a noisy, drooly, messy (shedding) goober, and I adore him.
:
 

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Did you choose a dog yet akkimmie? You know you have to come back and post pictures now when you get him/her, right?


We have two dogs, both mutts from the local shelter. One (see big dog link) is a 3 season dog at best. He gets really cold in the winter and as he gets older likes snow less and less. It was really hard to find him a "jacket"!

The other dog (little dog link) is a 3 season dog too, but the other way 'round. He loves the snow and cool weather just delights him. He does not seem to like the heat too much. So, although I do not live as far north as you, I can relate to the weather aspect
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
We have not picked a dog yet. We've been looking for awhile at our local shelter,friends of pets and several rescue places
: We have found a couple that would be perfect and the next day they have been adopted, which is bitter sweet
. I have full faith that the right dog or puppy will join our family soon
I hope it happens before the snow comes
Before motherhood I was a wildlife biologist and I'm in need of furry friends
 

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Just because it's worrying me that it's the second time you've mentioned weather, are you thinking that the dog will be left outside for any length of time? Because I've got to warn you away from that ASAP--dogs should be inside, constant members of the family. If it's just that you're worried about exercise/pee breaks, that's fine, but I would never want you to get a dog because it could be outside for eight hours at a time.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
thekimballs: I would NEVER NEVER NEVER leave a dog out!!!!!!!
: I am aware of the weather here and want time to prepare myself for having a dog
Basically I want, us as a family (including doggie), to have time together before adding the snow to the equation. Does that make sense? I can read all of the book and get as much info as possible but untill we have the experience of having a new addition there's a lot that we will learn once we have adopted.


I love all of the pictures and thanks agian for all of the input
 
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