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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>like campanula - bellflowers, or nastertium or wild onions or even mustard greens or elderberry flowers (to make yummy pancakes with)...</p>
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We eat dandelion greens in season. We also make wine from them. We also eat some edible flowers-- DH raises them in our gardens, though. We pick wild berries on DH's family's country property. We also eat wild onions. We only eat wild greens when we can be sure the ground hasn't been treated with pesticides and herbicides-- on family property, or on our church's properly since DH and I are the groundskeepers there and thus know everything that happens to the land there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<p>aaaaaah llyra - could i bother you to list what you eat - apart from what you have already listed. yeah we do berries too and discovered some new berries we didnt know of. .</p>
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<p>unfortunately yes its hard to find safe ground. for us its mostly wild areas where by the bug population and of course its distance seems like no pest control. nature areas. within city limits so not a park. </p>
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<p>esp. flowers. what particular flowers?</p>
 

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<p>From wild sources (either we pick or someone at the farmer's market has picked) we eat purslane, nasturtium, mustard greens, borage leaves, nettles, dandelion greens, and field amaranth. </p>
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<p>Flowers we eat from our yard would include nasturtium, fuschia, borage, tiger lily, chive flowers, and herb flowers.</p>
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<p>Wild berries we find - loads of blackberries and thimbleberries.  There are lots more berry types here, like huckleberry and elderberry - I just need to get a bit better with IDing.</p>
 

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<p>So, any wild food items?</p>
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<p>From my yard, we eat dandelions (greens and flowers), sorrell, purslane, linden leaves, daylily flowers, elderflowers (for tea and pancakes) and elderberries (for jelly, syrup and pie), hazelnuts, serviceberries, and aronia berries. We sometimes make pineapple weed tea, but more for the novelty than anything else, because it is hard to find enough plants in my yard to make it worthwhile.</p>
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<p>From outside the yard, we pick up blackberries, wild raspberries, mulberries, more hazelnuts, hickory nuts and walnuts (again, these are just for fun, because they are such a pain in the keester to crack), and mushrooms (morrells and puffballs) when we're lucky enough to find them, which isn't often.</p>
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<p>From the farmer's market we like nettles and ramps. Seems kind of funny to buy nettles, but I don't have any in my yard, and would rather buy them than introduce them. ;)</p>
 

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<p>We do dandelions in very early spring, after then they are too astringent.</p>
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<p>Those who do wild onions, how do they taste?  Chivy?  Garlicky?  Oniony?  I have a lifetime supply, and my fondest wish is that they could sub for scallions.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
<p>oooh i am loving reading these. </p>
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<p>plantnerd - wild onions in my opinion is much milder than scallions. they are sorta like the green end of scallions. </p>
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<p>when i have just picked them in passing and chew on them they taste oniony without the bite of onion. </p>
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<p>OwennZoe yeah any wild food. </p>
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<p>its something i now have to work on. just recognising these plants. </p>
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<p>i live in the city. and there is sooo much food around i am discovering. </p>
 

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<p>Right now we are eating sheep sorrel (which is my 4.5 yo's fave because of the lemony zing) and miners lettuce.</p>
 

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<p>Here is a great list for East Coast plants: <a href="http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/%C2%A0" target="_blank">http://www.wildmanstevebrill.com/ </a> Click on "Wild Plants".</p>
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<p>I lived in New York for the past two years, and blogged about wild foods.  Check it out here: <a href="http://feralfeast.blogspot.com/search/label/wild%20foods" target="_blank">http://feralfeast.blogspot.com/search/label/wild%20foods</a></p>
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<p>Here in WA state we have chickweed, nettles, miners lettuce, lots of berries, chanterelles (and many other 'shrooms), and hazelnuts.</p>
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
<p>thanks bantams.<img alt="chicken3.gif" src="http://files.mothering.com/images/smilies/chicken3.gif"></p>
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<p>i am on the west coast. sunny california. do you have a link for that region?</p>
 

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<p>Here is a Seattle-area company that sells to local restaurants.  They harvest from N CA to BC and Idaho.</p>
<p><a href="http://foragedandfoundedibles.com/index.html" target="_blank">http://foragedandfoundedibles.com/index.html</a></p>
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<p>I just found this website: <a href="http://feralkevin.com/" target="_blank">http://feralkevin.com/</a></p>
<p>It looks like there are some great articles here.</p>
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<p>Here's a foraging book:</p>
<p><a href="http://www.amazon.com/gp/redirect.html?ie=UTF8&linkCode=ur2&camp=1789&creative=9325&tag=motheringhud-20&location=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.amazon.com%2FWild-Table-Seasonal-Foraged-Recipes%2Fdp%2F0670022268%25C2%25A0" rel="norewrite" target="_blank">http://www.amazon.com/Wild-Table-Seasonal-Foraged-Recipes/dp/0670022268 </a> (I haven't read it, but it looks good!)</p>
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<p>I would recommend getting a couple good field guides of plants for your area.  My favorite way to find new edibles is to go on a long walk/hike, pick a specimen of any plant that 'looks' tasty, then bring them all home and identify them.  There are more edible plants than most people would think.  Just be careful with mushrooms!  Greens are pretty straightforward.</p>
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<p>Have fun!</p>
 
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