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in short...I have little to no time to read anymore! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
also, what convinced the other parent to go along with it? (I'm not going to assume it's all moms convincing dads even though that's my situation!)<br><br>
my reasons for considering it?<br><br>
1. All the tests. I know you have to take them as homeschoolers too, but homeschoolers from what I understand don't even take one every year? here in ps, they start in FIRST GRADE, there's a beginning and end of year test EVERY YEAR. And I've been a ps assistant for going on 5 years, the first 2.5 in elementary, I've SEEN how much time is spent 'teaching to the test'. It's sad. (correct me if I'm wrong on that testing thing?)<br><br>
2. Reading and Math. I struggled HUGE with math. I taught myself to READ at age 3. My newest epiphany on the subject is this---when my kids are 20, nobody will know if they mastered the basics of either subject at age 3 or 10. What WILL affect them is if they learn to hate it and avoid it at all costs--like me and math. If I homeschool, they can learn it when they are ready to learn it. I've often wondered how many PS kids would not struggle with reading if it wasn't pushed on them--kids are supposed to come out of KINDY reading now. Most of them are SIX. I've heard and read a few things that support the idea that many kids brains just aren't at the stage where they're ready to read till age 8. (I'd like more info on this too...I'm finding it pretty interesting.)<br><br>
those are my two big ones.
 

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DS1 was being held back for "not being mature enough". This was because he refused to teach a lower reading student to read therefore his "teamwork skills were poor". He had straight A's but needed to repeat the grade. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/dizzy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Dizzy">: He was evaluated for gifted but they said that even if he tested into the program he would not be allowed to go because he "didn't display the level of creativity expected of gifted children". I withdrew him about 2 minutes after that comment. DH was initially against homeschooling but I told him that if I totally screwed up that DS was already working a grade level ahead so he would be able to go back next year without loosing any ground. I also told him that it was either hsing or prozac. He had an appointment the next day with the doctor to evaluate for depression and he was being put on prozac because of the stress from ps. HSing was the lesser of the two evils in DH mind. He is supportive now!<br><br>
DS2 has a Dx of autism and the school said that he would be place directly into the special ed class with no chance of mainstreaming him because they lacked the resources to provide him the support he would need in a mainstream classroom. The class he was going to be placed in was for LD behavior kids. they had one class for the entire school. So my 5 year old child with bad impulse control was going to be placed in a class with 13or 14 other kids, half of which were 4th and 5th graders, all of which have behavior problems. When I asked about academics since DS2 had just tested with a 135 IQ they said it was good that he was smart because they spend less time on academics and more time on teaching them how to behave. No Child Left Behind, Yeah Right!!!!! Um, no thanks! He was never enrolled.
 

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My husband hated school as a child. He was never stimulated to keep his brain busy so he acted out and got in all kinds of trouble. They also tried tomedicate him for a while to stop his behaviors. I hate school as a child. I was a loner and never did well in class settings. My older children did not do well in public schools. So we made the decision to homeschool before we ever adopted our son. We knew we were not going to put him through that. Now that we see what a busy busy little boy he is, they would probably try to medicate him to get him to sit still and listen. That's not what I want for him. So it was a no brainer for us to homeschool him.<br><br>
Testing depends on where you live. Here in New Jersey there is no testing, no accountability at all. You don't have to register or tell anyone that you are homeschooling.<br><br>
Waldorf theory says that children are not ready to learn things like reading and math until they lose their first teeth, around six or seven years old. You might want to check in on the thread about Waldorf learning to get more info on this.<br><br>
Kids spend 6 or more hours per day in school classrooms for 13 years of their lives. They say that it takes 100 hours to learn everything you need to learn. So all the rest of that time is just spent standing in line, being told to sit down, discipline, waiting for others to catch up, all kinds of things, but not learning. You can cover more material in 30 minutes at home with your child than they will cover in a six hour day at school.<br><br>
Kathi
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>frogguruami</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7984583"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">No Child Left Behind, Yeah Right!!!!! Um, no thanks!</div>
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<br>
No Homeschooled Child is Ever Left Behind!!!
 

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We plan on homeschooling b/c DH and I were left behind in school. We were both in the gifted program in elementary school, and then spent all of middle and high school repeating stuff that other people were having trouble with (I know for a fact I was assigned the same EXACT homework 3 years in a row in English class, I turned in the old homework) We ended up getting C's and D's in High school, just because we weren't being challenged at all. Also DH's little sister had a teacher who argued with her that the Arctic Ocean is in Antarctica. I hope to travel cross country with the girls, and teach them very hands on.
 

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It wasn't my choice, ds refused to be schooled <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> .
 

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you are right about the testing. 2nd, 4th, 8th and 11th (? most kids are old enough to not be officially enrolled at this age and can avoid testing that way)<br><br>
the tests are really random too. I don;t see how a public school kids could do well unless the teacher went down the list and just taught all the random things on it. nuts<br><br>
and if you bomb there is nothing they can do to you. and bomb we did. oh yeah.<br><br>
as for conviceing your dh that is somethins I can't really cmoment on. but i think it helps when we go in willing to listen rather than trying to prove our case. All the studies and books and testimonials didn't do anything to convince my husband. he is still not convinced and we are gearing up for 5th grade. Also being willing to compromise and do what he wants helps. My dh wants standardized tests every year. I tihk it is stupid but I am totally willing if that makes him feel better. he also wanted us to use a curriculum. fine. at least we are still homeschooling.
 

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My story is here:<br><br><a href="http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art44206.asp" target="_blank">http://www.bellaonline.com/articles/art44206.asp</a><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>zakers_mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7984240"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">in short...I have little to no time to read anymore! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
also, what convinced the other parent to go along with it? (I'm not going to assume it's all moms convincing dads even though that's my situation!)<br><br>
my reasons for considering it?<br><br>
1. All the tests. I know you have to take them as homeschoolers too, but homeschoolers from what I understand don't even take one every year? here in ps, they start in FIRST GRADE, there's a beginning and end of year test EVERY YEAR. And I've been a ps assistant for going on 5 years, the first 2.5 in elementary, I've SEEN how much time is spent 'teaching to the test'. It's sad. (correct me if I'm wrong on that testing thing?)<br><br>
2. Reading and Math. I struggled HUGE with math. I taught myself to READ at age 3. My newest epiphany on the subject is this---when my kids are 20, nobody will know if they mastered the basics of either subject at age 3 or 10. What WILL affect them is if they learn to hate it and avoid it at all costs--like me and math. If I homeschool, they can learn it when they are ready to learn it. I've often wondered how many PS kids would not struggle with reading if it wasn't pushed on them--kids are supposed to come out of KINDY reading now. Most of them are SIX. I've heard and read a few things that support the idea that many kids brains just aren't at the stage where they're ready to read till age 8. (I'd like more info on this too...I'm finding it pretty interesting.)<br><br>
those are my two big ones.</div>
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Here you don't have to take tests when you are homeschooling <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
My reasons are<br><br>
--The idea of my child going to school all day and then coming home to limited family time and still having homework sounds like bondage to me<br>
-- I want my children to have time to play, outside, a lot.<br>
-- I want my children to be able to wake up in the morning and not have to rush out the door onto the bus at 6:30 am on a cold snowy morning (bondage!)<br>
--More family time (yes really this is a good reason)<br>
-- I no longer believe in the school system<br>
-- Sitting for that many hours of a day is cruel and unusual punishment for a child
 

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For our family, HS is about time and freedom. Before my kids were born, I was working at a great company with a creative job, and assumed I'd be heading back after my maternity leave. But once I had my little girl, I realized I wanted to stay home and nurse her, not pump at work, so I put off going back for a while, worked part time from home etc. I came across the idea when my oldest was maybe 6 months old. I loved the idea that we could just keep hanging out as a family doing things we enjoyed and being together. I have a bit of teenage rebellion leftover in me so I liked the idea of not having to follow someone elses arbitrary schedule, and of course the idea that we could learn and do what we chose when we chose. Then I met some hs kids who were preteens and teens and they were friendly, could carry on a conversation with someone 4 or 40, had their own goals, dreams ideas, and could discuss them and knew how to chase them themselves. It was so refreshing I knew it was something I was interested in. My husband wasn't opposed, and as he says there was no point in arguing with me. When my oldest reached school age I just knew none of us really wanted to do it. We liked being together and I liked watching them learn and learning alongside them. Now he knows too it was definately the right choice for us. My kids are now 9 and 7, have never been to school, and none of us have any interest in them going until they are ready for college if that is the path they choose. They are smart, funny, love life, love learning new things and know how to entertain themselves. We love the time and freedom this lifestyle gives us and I feel very blessed to have discovered it.
 

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Mostly because I think formal schooling is inefficient and wastes kids' time, and they get bored with learning because their needs aren't being met.<br><br>
I wrote an essay once (which got posted on the web somewhere ...) comparing different school models to lunch. Public schools are like public school lunch - generally sufficient to meet nutritional needs, but not necessarily appetizing or appropriate for your kid's tastes. Homeschooling is like making your kid's lunch: if you have the time and energy, you can tailor your lunch to the child's interests and make it fresh and healthy. But if you don't have time or dedication and you don't help your kid make good choices, you may find that they're eating Cheetos and Coke every day. [ETA: In case this sounds like I'm dissing unschoolers, I think unschoolers are more like parents who stock their kitchens with fruits and vegetables and bake homemade bread and squeeze their own juice, and then say, "kids, eat whatever you want!"]<br><br>
I think that *some* public schools, like *some* public school lunch programs, are a great fit for some kids. So I don't want to say that public school is always bad. But overall, the system tends to produce bland, over-processed, boring, repetitive education (just like the food!).
 

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We just decided to homeschool my 5yo. We never planned it- in fact, we registered him in our local public school, and then set out to find out which school/teacher would be best for him. He is naturally curious, active, outgoing, and more than a little bit impulsive, so we knew that we could not just let any teacher have him. But the more we looked, the more we could see that <i>none</i> of our options would be a good fit for him. In fact, I could see children like him being mistreated, labeled, and getting punished for just being themselves. This was definitely not good enough, and so we decided to homeschool.<br>
Dh was my biggest obstacle, but the more we discussed and researched it, the more he was convinced as well, though I think the proof for him will be in how well my ds learns this first year. He tends to go with me when I want to try something completely foreign, and then is convinced when it all turns out well.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br>
My family has been completely supportive of homeschooling, and even surprised me by saying that they thought it was the best thing for ds.<br>
Dh's family- well, we haven't told them yet.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/redface.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Embarrassment">
 

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Oh i forgot to answer your main question (I was distracted by your beautiful babies.)<br><br>
Growing up about half the kids I knew were homeschooled. So it was a very natrual choice for me. i never saw a good reason not to.
 

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My list might go on for miles!!<br><br>
1) I believe it's my responsibility as a parent to educate my child. It's not the government's responsibility.<br>
2) Not wanting my kids to be away from me all day.<br>
3) Being able to teach the way I want to (adding in more of our faith, my own methods, etc.)<br>
4) It's more relaxed for the parents and children.<br>
5) Keeping them away from negative influences until they're ready to handle them.<br>
6) We live in a state with one of the worst educational systems in the country!<br>
7) I want to teach them to love learning, not hate school (like I did).<br>
8) Bullies.<br>
9) I think I can do a better job with 2 kids (or however many we have) than one teacher can do with 30 kids.<br>
10) The freedom of being able to vacation, go on fieldtrips, etc when we want.<br><br>
And that's just to name a few. As for who was on board first, I'm not sure. I think I brought it up initially when we were engaged or newly married and DH was all for it!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Stayseeliz</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7989332"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">My list might go on for miles!!<br><br>
1) I believe it's my responsibility as a parent to educate my child. It's not the government's responsibility.<br>
2) Not wanting my kids to be away from me all day.<br>
3) Being able to teach the way I want to (adding in more of our faith, my own methods, etc.)<br>
4) It's more relaxed for the parents and children.<br>
5) Keeping them away from negative influences until they're ready to handle them.<br>
6) We live in a state with one of the worst educational systems in the country!<br>
7) I want to teach them to love learning, not hate school (like I did).<br>
8) Bullies.<br>
9) I think I can do a better job with 2 kids (or however many we have) than one teacher can do with 30 kids.<br>
10) The freedom of being able to vacation, go on fieldtrips, etc when we want.<br></div>
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Same here...Except #6. I guess Iowa's schools are fairly good.<br><br>
I also crave the flexibility. No rigid schedules!
 

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My anam cara told me we were! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> He was in public and private school, and hated it. I was in public school, private school, homeschooled, and unschooled. So I agreed readily. For me I just wanted my kids to have freedom. Children have a right to freedom.
 

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Main Reasons (many of these others have already stated!)<br><br>
1. More time together. More time with my DS, more time as a family since DS can stay up later to have time with his papa and we are always available if DH decides to take a couple of days off.<br><br>
2. Freedom. We can go visit my family in the US when we want, not just during school holidays. Same with going on vacation as a family, we go when we want, not with the masses. Freedom from bedtime and morning stress too! And homework!<br><br>
3. Bad socialization that you find in schools. Teasing, pecking order, I'm-your-friend-one-day-but-not-the-next-day type of stuff. I remember in 1st grade chanting along with other kids "2,4,6,8 who do we eliminate, (kid's name)" That poor little six year old boy was teased every day. I was teased and bullied later on. I feel I went into school at age 5 just fine and came out at age 17 broken.<br><br>
4. Love of learning, knowing how to learn.<br><br>
5. Knowing what my child does all day and not having someone else parenting in my place. I think this should be a very gradual process, not suddenly he spends his days away from home and family.<br><br>
6. The most immediate reason was that school started at age 3 where we lived and my DS couldn't speak very well when he turned three. I realized that something bad could happen to him and he wouldn't even be able to tell me about it. There were lots of other reasons, but this one was a major one at that time. Problem was DH (and MIL) argued that DS needed to go to school so he would speak better. Rubbish!<br><br>
Getting DH on board? He was sort of agreeing one moment, totally against it the next. It was very stressful. However, there was no way I was putting DS in school. I didn't quite phrase it that way to DH though. We had many stressful "discussions" and finally I just avoided the topic. What is the use of arguing over and over? My DH needed time to come around. He needed to see that our DS wasn't going to be a social leper at the age of 4 and that he would be learning of sorts of things.<br><br>
Part of our deal was that DS would be in some kind of social activity. I found a little art class one hour per week for ages 3-6. I ended up staying there with him but I didn't tell my DH that. Sometimes we left after 40 minutes but I didn't tell him that either (hey he never asked, some info doesn't need to be volunteered). My DS did get something out of it and it was better not to push him to stay by himself or to stay the whole time.<br><br>
After 6 weeks of that we moved and I found a parent-child gym class. We did that the rest of the year and the past two years he's not been enrolled in anything. He hasn't been ready and my DH has chilled out a lot since that first year. He said last summer that he trusts me on this 100%. That doesn't mean he never has doubts, but he accepts that DS is homeschooled. He will sometimes hear positive comments about homeschooling and pass them on to me.<br><br>
Best of luck to you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br><br>
PS to pookel: I like the public school/public lunch analogy!<br>
PPS It really was my intention to keep this short. Sorry!
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Needle in the Hay</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7990341"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Main Reasons (many of these others have already stated!)<br><br>
1. More time together. More time with my DS, more time as a family since DS can stay up later to have time with his papa and we are always available if DH decides to take a couple of days off.<br><br>
2. Freedom. We can go visit my family in the US when we want, not just during school holidays. Same with going on vacation as a family, we go when we want, not with the masses. Freedom from bedtime and morning stress too! And homework!<br><br>
3. Bad socialization that you find in schools. Teasing, pecking order, I'm-your-friend-one-day-but-not-the-next-day type of stuff. I remember in 1st grade chanting along with other kids "2,4,6,8 who do we eliminate, (kid's name)" That poor little six year old boy was teased every day. I was teased and bullied later on. I feel I went into school at age 5 just fine and came out at age 17 broken.<br><br>
4. Love of learning, knowing how to learn.<br><br>
5. Knowing what my child does all day and not having someone else parenting in my place. I think this should be a very gradual process, not suddenly he spends his days away from home and family.<br><br>
6. The most immediate reason was that school started at age 3 where we lived and my DS couldn't speak very well when he turned three. I realized that something bad could happen to him and he wouldn't even be able to tell me about it. There were lots of other reasons, but this one was a major one at that time. Problem was DH (and MIL) argued that DS needed to go to school so he would speak better. Rubbish!<br></div>
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Ditto almost to the letter. Number 6 - ds1 was exactly the same, except I bowed to the pressure to put him in preschool to enhance his language skills. It was a wonderful program and he loved it the two years he was there, but I wish I had followed my original plan and never sent him.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">
 

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Well, we decided when our daughter was supposed to go to kindergarten. She was born 10 days past the deadline, so we talked with the school about putting her in first grade instead. They were so reluctant even to consider it, even though she had done over a year of 'kindergarten' at Montessori. She was reading The Hobbit and doing double digit multiplication. It was then that I realized first grade wasn't going to be a great fit either! Now we can explore things at her pace, but still keep the time for her to be a kid and play in her elaborate fantasy worlds.<br><br>
I agree with you about kids often not being ready to read until they are 8 or so. One of my daughter's best friends barely read at 8. By 8 1/2 he was reading A Series of Unfortunate Events. It was great that his parents could indulge his passion for science and patiently play with pre-reading skills until he was truly ready.
 

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nak<br><br>
we unschool for so many reasons. the main being:<br>
we want to raise our kids--not someone else.<br>
we want the freedom to camp/travel/enjoy life (live free, learn free)<br>
we do not believe in the arbitrary testing done in our state.<br>
we both felt unchallenged and bored in our own schooling.<br>
.<br>
.<br>
.<br>
.<br>
.
 
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