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Today I found out my 1yr olds lead levels went up to 14. What should I do? My ped. said they are reporting it to the health department. Any mothers with experience with lead poisoning?
 

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Oh wow, I am so sorry. My dh does research into toxins like lead so I know what it can do and how it can affect the family. Here is a website with some info that might help but the health department should also be able to help.<br><br><a href="http://www.leadsafehomes.info/index.jsp" target="_blank">http://www.leadsafehomes.info/index.jsp</a>
 

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Ahimsa, sorry to hear that Kai's lead level is high. My husband was on my case a while back about Desmond being small and brought up the lead risk in an old house line of thought. I've been meaning to see if ds could get tested just to rule that out. Unfortunately, I don't have a whole lot of info or experience with this. When I mentioned this in the 'mothers of skinny minnies' thread someone pmed me about her son having had lead poisoning. If you want I can pm her and see if she'll get in touch with you.<br>
Boongirl's link is rather helpful (thank you, boongirl). It seems like you should be able to get a grant to check for lead at your house. Sorry I can't be much more help.
 

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My daughter has a slightly elevated count (7) Since hers isn't over 10, the city doesn't get involved, but we've been trying on our own to figure out where it's coming from. Here's what I've learned:<br><br>
Depending on where you live, the health dept. may send someone out to check your house and find out where it's coming from since the level was above 10 (above 10 the health dept. usually investigates; above 20-30, they often suggest chelation to remove some of the lead, but that also involves hospitalizaton and serious lead-related illness). You can also usually find lead testing companies in the phone book, too. They'll come out and test things like the paint, window and door sills (the friction often puts flaking old paint into the air from these), soil, etc. Depending on where it's coming from you can figure out what to do to fix it.<br><br>
In the meantime, there are procedures you can follow to reduce lead exposure, like wiping window ledges and dusty places with a wet cloth (Dry cloths are dangerous and put more dust into the air). Washing hands before eating and periodically during the day if your child puts their hands in their mouths may also help.<br><br>
You may also want to have your ped check your child's iron levels. If a child has low iron, then their bodies "mistake" lead for iron and may pull more of it in rather than passing it through. If the child's iron is low, you can do supplements/vitamins or more iron-rich foods.<br><br>
I'm sure you know about the more common things like water pipes and old paint, but some of the odd sources of low levels of lead that I discovered: some electrical cords/adapters, some old plastic toys, pewter, costume jewelry, and sometimes even modern vending machine jewelry (any jewelry that seems heavy for its size is suspect), keys (virtually any copies of keys have some lead content).<br><br>
Links:<br><a href="http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/faq/about.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/lead/faq/about.htm</a><br><a href="http://www.leadsafe.org/index.htm" target="_blank">http://www.leadsafe.org/index.htm</a>
 

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We have a tribe going on in Health and Healing for moms dealing with high lead levels. Might be something you want to check out. It's on the 4th page right now but I'm planning to post today so it should get bumped to the front.
 

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wow, I'm going to look for that fyt thread too --<br><br>
My 2.5 yo ds had/has high lead. It was 9 at 6 months, but stupidly I let them convince me it must have been an error, and was 29 <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/bag.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Bag">: at one. BUT those were both toe pricks. His venal draw at one (done a few weeks after the first) was 21. So thats the first thing. Chances are really good that the number is high if it was a toe or thumb prick as opposed to a venal draw.<br><br>
The biggest thing you can actively do is clean, clean, clean.<br><br>
Get a (good) Hepa vacuum, and use it everywhere, don't sweep or dust mop, or vacuum w/out hepa, cause you'll just stir up dust. Then damp mop and wipe surfaces with high phosphate cleaning solution (automatic dishwasher powder is what I used) The phosphate binds to the lead.<br><br>
Make sure your dc has a full tummy and eats lots of healthy food. Malnourished kids (not that yours is likely to be) absorb more lead.<br><br>
Then, call your state health department, or talk to your pedi about a state subsidised lead abatment program. It can take a while, so apply asap (I applied when my ds was 3 or 4 wks old, and we got in, but they ran out of $$ for the fiscal year, and didn't get to us until he was one. BUT we got all the work done, basically free. Some is grant, some is loan, but the loan is 0% interest and doesn't have to be paid back if we stay in the house for 10 years after getting the work done.<br><br>
In the mean time, you can paint over any questionable paint. If it is really chipped, and you can't paint over it w/out sending chips and dust flying, put duct tape or something over it.<br><br>
Also, a few more not commonly know sources of lead:<br><br>
Some old plaster has lead<br><br>
old varnish can be lead based<br><br>
toys made in other countrys may still be painted with lead paint<br><br>
Okay, my babe is waking. I'll see you later on the other thread, I hope <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 
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