Mothering Forum banner

1 - 7 of 7 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The ideas I've found so far:<br><br>
* Ask neighbours with yards if they'd be willing to take your compost. It's a win-win situation since you get rid of your compost, and they benefit from free fertilizer/rich soil.<br><br>
* Our Community Gardens are avaiable year round for dumping of compostables. [Contact info. removed]<br><br>
* <a href="http://one-change.com/blog/2006/04/indoor-compost-bin/" target="_blank">Indoor Compost Bin</a> can work is small spaces (like in a closet). For those who have more area, but still no yard, there's all types of <a href="http://www.hgtv.com/hgtv/gl_soil_water_mulch/article/0,1785,HGTV_3634_1382236,00.html" target="_blank">Indoor Garage Compost Bin</a> ideas out there.<br><br>
* Buy and install a garburator. It's not as expensive as it sounds, and they are great for quick disposal of compostables. The only drawback is this is only best for people to own, or rent longterm in one place.<br><br>
* Blend compostables and dispose down the drain. Essentially what a garburator does, but more accessible . If you do this once a day or so, it's another quick and easy way to dispose of compostables quickly, whilst sparing the landfills. Not just for this, but I'd suggest investing in a good blender, because it'll last you forever, and it'll blend everything like a dream (speaking from experience, it's worth it).<br><br>
So, I want to pick your brains on two issues:<br><br>
1. I've been told by someone that "putting foodstuff like this [last two ideas above] can encourage rats to come up drains even more."<br><br>
I had no idea this happened! I live in a fairly new dwelling (20 years old) so I doubt we have these issues. Does anyone here have experoence with these issuues?<br><br>
2. Any other ideas to help keep compostables out of landfills for those who don't have yards?<br><br>
Thanks so much <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
307 Posts
I knew someone who lived in a trailer park where they wouldn't allow her to have an outdoor compost bin. So she bought an ogger (sp?) and would dig up perfect little holes (like for burying fence posts) in the little bit of yard she did have and then she would bury her compost.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,366 Posts
I have never given thought to this problem, but once you say it makes me think what do folks in big cities do with their compostables.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"><br><br>
The only thing I'm imagining is someone going to a park or somewhere public with land and pulling out thier little bag of vegetable peels and when no one is looking burying it in a little area of ground. That would be an okay solution for 1 or 2 or even a dozen prople but if everyone did that it would become a problem and possibly a hazard.<br><br>
Because I don't know the workings of cities, I never have lived in one, but I've seen some towns that have the recyle bins that they pick up at the curb, wouldn't it be neat if cities provided a bin for compost?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,109 Posts
I pick up compostables from my neighbors once a week. They don't want it, it builds my supplies and cuts their trash bills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>lightheart</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7958171"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I have never given thought to this problem, but once you say it makes me think what do folks in big cities do with their compostables.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/bigeyes.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="bigeyes"></div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Yep, I think it's a big problem really, because our landfills are being filled up with veg. matter that can easily be used again <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"> I wish our city cared more, but at this point they have about 75 years of landfill space available, and they couldn't be bothered to do much more forward thinking I guess. For them, all it comes down to is $ for the moment.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">The only thing I'm imagining is someone going to a park or somewhere public with land...</td>
</tr></table></div>
That would be considered littering, unfortunately. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">Because I don't know the workings of cities, I never have lived in one, but I've seen some towns that have the recyle bins that they pick up at the curb, wouldn't it be neat if cities provided a bin for compost?</td>
</tr></table></div>
Many cities have curbside pick-up of compost. Many provide bins, and there is the option to buy biodegradable plastic bags to line the bin with.<br><br>
In St. John NB, a city a third of the size of ours, has had a city-wide composting pick-up system for over 5 years now. I have no clue why it isn't something not being implemented more (I know the initial start-up costs are high, but I bet the benefits will be very apparent not long after).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,217 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mtn.mama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/7958779"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I pick up compostables from my neighbors once a week. They don't want it, it builds my supplies and cuts their trash bills.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Thats wonderful. We don't have to pay upfront for trash pick-up. We have a four bag limit, where one bag can be as large as those household wheeled bins. For most people, that doesn't give them much motivation to reduce garbage output, leave alone being concerned with compost. :/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,109 Posts
worm bin!<br><br><a href="http://www.cityfarmer.org/wormcomp61.html" target="_blank">http://www.cityfarmer.org/wormcomp61.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.sierraclub.org/e-files/worm_bins.asp" target="_blank">http://www.sierraclub.org/e-files/worm_bins.asp</a>
 
1 - 7 of 7 Posts
Top