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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
in my attempt to cut cost as much as humanly possible id like to continue our garden thru the fall and winter, however we live in MA where we get EXTREMLY cold temps and sometimes early as in late sept. ive looked where i can online but really im not that good lol. id like to start planting now if possible.
things we eat are
mushrooms
carrots
lettuce
peppers
tomatoes
green/yellow beans
celery
radishes

my boys also could eat strawberries for ever and a day so what about those? even if your not sure but know of some links that might be able to help id really apprecite it! thanks!!
 

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Your winters might be cold but you can definitely continue your garden into the fall and possibly winter. The key is to start planting NOW so that your fall/winter crops have time to grow before cold weather sets in. When the weather gets cold and the days shorten, the plants will stop growing but if you've chosen cold weather crops then they will (hopefully) survive even freezing cold temps until you're ready to harvest. A thick layer of mulch will help them survive cold weather. I always get straw bales for cheap from the pumpkin farm in fall and mulch with that.

Anything from the cabbage family, onions, radishes, carrots, beets, spinach, and lettuce are a good bet. Try planting some peas for a fall harvest.

I have never tried growing food plants indoors but it seems like tomatoes might do well only because they are not very fussy. It would probably be easy to grow a box of greens in a sunny window.

If you have time and are interested, two good books that discuss year-round gardening are Four-Season Harvest : Organic Vegetables From Your Home Garden All Year Long by Eliot Coleman (this guy lives in Maine so his advice is probably more relevant to you) and Gardening when it counts : growing food in hard times by Steve Solomon.

Best wishes,
Cathy
 

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Peppers! Peppers do really well inside and will produce if you put them under the right conditions. Even if they don't get fruit, they will be HUGE when you put them out and start setting right away.
The above link is one of my favorite sites (and programmes, Mike is on NPR
)
 
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