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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've read a little bit about sensory processing disorders and I do not think my dd has SPD, but she does seem to be sensory sensitive. However, I am thinking that perhaps some sensory sensitivity is normal for dc this age? I will describe dd's sensory issues.<br><br>
1) Does not like certain fabrics, weights of fabrics, tags, socks, etc. Sometimes particular about sleeves being rolled up.<br><br>
2) Will sometimes get so frustrated b/c of clothing that doesn't suit her that right after I put it on she kicks and flails and yells about it.<br><br>
3) Has a hard time winding down to go to sleep and will kick and thrash around interminably until "distracted" to sleep. It's like she can't let herself go. I understand the feeling as a lifelong insomniac. She also prefers lots of cover, as I always have. This connected with me to something I have read about sensory-defensive kids needing weighted blankets.<br><br>
4) Has started mouthing things after not being interested in mouthing things since infancy. Also licks her lower lip a lot. The mouthing is not excessive, but sometimes very inappropriate (i.e. she put a rock in her mouth the other day. She is VERY aware that that is not something that should be in her mouth.)<br><br>
5) She also looooves to dump things, knock things down, make a mess, loves sensory play of any kind, always has. But, she is not a dumping maniac as she was when she was 15-18 months old. She can put her toys and books away correctly and often enjoys cleaning up as well as making the mess, but needs lots of direction, of course.<br><br>
So, are these behaviors within the realm of normal for a 2 1/2 year old, or do you think she is having some problems with sensory input?
 

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Those were my warning signs with ds about 8mths ago. He has SPD, but he also has alot more than those you listed.<br><br>
It definatly does sound more than average, IYKWIM? But unless you and her are having a really hard time coping, i would probably ride it out for a while more and see if she grows out of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for responding, wonderwahine - can you tell me more about your son? What were his warning signs and when did you have him evaluated, and by whom? What treatments (if any) is he receiving?<br><br>
I don't think that with my dd this is something that currently needs therapy. She is generally very happy and go with the flow and seems to tantrum less than the other kids we know. But clearly, the sensory stuff with the clothes etc. bothers her. Maybe I just need to find some strategies to help her.
 

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He did the things you listed, he also hates being naked, or having his skin exposed (wears only footed sleepers), wont wear shoes even soft ones, would bang his head on things when frustrated, frusrates easily, he has an oral aversion, alot of stuff that would take forever to list.<br><br>
he currently has the diagnosis of spd, but we are getting him a speech evaluation to investigate possible autisim spectrum stuff because he regressed in his language to the point of being non verbal. We had him evaulated 5mths ago by early intervention, and we got a occupational therapy eval and developmental eval.<br><br>
we first read "the out of sync child" after a recomendation from an online freind and things started really clicking, so we got an evaluation. He is ment to start Occupational therapy and physical therapy, but we are on a waitlist because of a shortage.<br><br>
There are a few more book out there that are helpful, the out of sync child has fun, the sensory sensitive child, quirky kids. There are alot of therapys you can do at home by yourself <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Nora sounds the opposite to your ds, loves being naked, and will NOT wear footed sleepers anymore! In fact they are her #1 most hated piece of clothing.<br><br>
She isn't thrilled about wearing shoes or socks, but she does. She in fact will tolerate almost any kind of clothing (besides footed sleepers!) if cajoled into it. Which makes me think this is not so severe. But, I don't know if it's a normal 2-yo thing to melt down over not wearing footed pj's., etc.<br><br>
When did your ds regress verbally? That must have been really scary.<br><br>
The only other thing that my dd "matches" from the list is that she sometimes frustrates easily, but it's hard to say whether she frustrates easily for a 2-yo. Her other 2-yo friends often seem to frustrate just as easily, although perhaps over different things. And we really work with her to help her find ways to deal with her frustration. Really most of that seems to be wanting to do more with her body, faster, more precisely than she can, just yet.<br><br>
Thanks again for your insight.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Nora'sMama</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9880581"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Nora sounds the opposite to your ds, loves being naked, and will NOT wear footed sleepers anymore! In fact they are her #1 most hated piece of clothing.<br><br>
She isn't thrilled about wearing shoes or socks, but she does. She in fact will tolerate almost any kind of clothing (besides footed sleepers!) if cajoled into it. Which makes me think this is not so severe. But, I don't know if it's a normal 2-yo thing to melt down over not wearing footed pj's., etc.<br><br>
When did your ds regress verbally? That must have been really scary.<br><br>
The only other thing that my dd "matches" from the list is that she sometimes frustrates easily, but it's hard to say whether she frustrates easily for a 2-yo. Her other 2-yo friends often seem to frustrate just as easily, although perhaps over different things. And we really work with her to help her find ways to deal with her frustration. Really most of that seems to be wanting to do more with her body, faster, more precisely than she can, just yet.<br><br>
Thanks again for your insight.</div>
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there are two, or really 3 types, sensory seekers, sensory defensive, and a mix of both. ds is a mix of both but more defensive than seeker.<br><br>
when it comes to clothing, ds is defensive to textures and stuff, but also to being exposed. Some spd kids hate clothing at all and love being naked.<br><br>
He started regressing around 15mths but we didnt really pay attention, he had been a late talker anyway, so we thought it might have just been a quiet period. He went from having around 15 words and abour 6 signs along with 2 word sentances, to just 10 words and 3 signs when they evauated him. And about a month after they eval'd him he stopped talking, signing and even babbling. Thankfully in the past month he has started saying mama, no, and numnum again, and hes signing "more" again. He still doesnt talk or babble much though, maybe 4-6 times a day, and usually thats just mama!! It was and is still a little scary, But me and dh have taken it in stride. We have learnt to see the joy in the little things.
 

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Spirited kids sometimes have these tendencies as well. I love Kurcinka's book, Raising Your Spirited Child. I dunno - I have a lot of sensory issues and grew up never knowing why I was so upset and physically uncomfortable so often. No adults around me ever validated how I was feeling and even as an adult I was jokingly labeled as "neurotic." I think being supportive to your child is a huge step in the right direction and it sounds as if you are doing this. I would try to find clothes that are comfortable (and buy a bunch of the same type once you find what works) and just try to work around the issues where possible, providing a home that is safe and relaxing.
 

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Not to jump in on your conversation here, but I would agree with WW that that seems like a little "more than average." About 9 months ago, I read The Out-of-Sync Child, suspecting that perhaps I was seeing signs of SPD in my two-year-old. Reading that book brought me to the conclusion that what I was seeing was probably just a few little "sensory quirks" as opposed to SPD.<br>
My son, at that age (right around his second birthday):<br>
1. Didn't like to get dirty. Wouldn't play with Play-doh or other "sensory" type things (shaving cream, sand table, et cetera). He wouldn't walk in sand.<br>
2. We were having biting issues with him, that seemed like they might be sensory-related. For instance, if my husband picked him up and did "airplane"-type games with him, he would bite. If we were snuggling and kissing him a lot, he would bite. It was like any time things got too exciting--"good-exciting" or "bad-exciting,"--he would bite.<br>
3. He would (still does) get really upset about having lotion rubbed on his body--whether baby lotion or sunscreen.<br><br>
In his case, I think he's just sort of "sensitive" to some sensory things. He isn't particular about textures in his clothes or food. Now, almost 3, he still doesn't like to get dirty, but he can put it aside to participate in an activity (he loves the sand-and-water table now), and just wants to clean up right after. He has to have a clean shirt if he drips a bit of applesauce on it, but he'll put the shirt back on if I take it and dry it off--he isn't concerned about how it *looks*, but doesn't like the wet spot. He's outgrown the biting completely. He still hates sunscreen (we don't bother with lotion), but knows he has to have it on to play outside in the summer, so he tolerates it.<br><br>
So, just to give you another perspective, these were the things that were concerning me a year ago, that turned out to be just Sam's quirks and preferences.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks. The more I think about it, the more I remember the quirks the other kids we know have. I definitely think she has some sensory sensitivities, but I hope that she will either outgrow them or learn to live with them - at this point in time, they don't seem to impact her life except at the moment I'm putting her "itchy" socks on, or whatever.<br><br>
I definitely know now which socks she likes and will only buy that kind, going forward. But I think it is good to note that if the itchy socks are the only ones left, and she has to wear them (this has happened a few times), her discomfort seems to go away after she has her shoes on and has walked around. When we have to put something on that is not her preference, I remind her of this - "last time you wore these socks you didn't want to put them on, but in a few minutes you were OK." I also don't make her wear socks/shoes if she doesn't want to unless she is going to be walking outside in an environment where bare feet are not appropriate.<br><br>
OK, have to go. Just wanted to say thanks for the responses.
 
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