Mothering Forum banner

1 - 16 of 16 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
470 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I keep reading in other peoples threads that they are concerned about using suncream on their babies.<br><br>
What have I missed? Is suncream not safe? I thought I was protecting my DD by using it.<br><br>
Can anyone enlighten me?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
6,573 Posts
I'm not sure - i'd like to find out too. I used to live in Arizona so dd 1 was always slathered with sunscreen - I live in California now so beach going = sunscreen. Maybe someone can enlighten both of us.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
485 Posts
I don't know all the details - no expert here - but I have read of studies that have shown that some of the UV blockers used in the US are genetically harmful and in large quantities or concentrations can alter DNA (in lab studies). Also, some of the ingredients mimic estrogens, and of course, are absorbed into our bodies. Lavera makes an all-natural (although very expensive) sunscreen - there are others as well - Alba Botanica, and others.<br><br>
Also, it is interesting to note that with the marketing of higher and higher SPFs, we are getting higher concentrations of the bad chemicals, although the real difference in percentages of rays blocked between a 30 SPF and a 50 SPF is not that huge - I don't remember the exact stats.<br><br>
My response is to try to use the natural sunscreens for my dd (she was a fall baby, so it was easy for us to wait till she was 6 months to use any at all), and to use a lower SPF, reapplying as needed. As someone who does not have extremely fair skin, a lower SPF is fine for me - I'm sure those with extremely fair skin would have to weigh the risks and use a higher SPF.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
492 Posts
We use a "physical" rather than "chemical" sunscreen on DD (11 months). This article explains the difference: <a href="http://www.babycenter.com/expert/baby/babysafety/12504.html?ccRelLink=&url=%2Fexpert%2F12506.html&xTopic=babysafeout&bus=content" target="_blank">http://www.babycenter.com/expert/bab...ut&bus=content</a><br><br>
HTH!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,591 Posts
We also use a physical sunscreen. California Baby makes a good product with titanium dioxide. My children and myself are very fair skinned and live in Arizona so sunscreen is pretty much a necessity for us in the summer months.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
795 Posts
Hi,<br><br>
I didn't know sunscreen was bad either until I came here... After some research, I thought I was safe going with Aubrey Organics Green Tea Sunblock for children. Now, after looking for links to include in my reply here, I found these:<br><br><a href="http://www.terressentials.com/truthaboutsunscreens.html" target="_blank">http://www.terressentials.com/truthaboutsunscreens.html</a><br><br><a href="http://www.terressentials.com/endocrine.html" target="_blank">http://www.terressentials.com/endocrine.html</a><br><br>
Admittedly, this is a commercial site, but do a search on the WWW in general and you will find lots of sites which tell you that parabens (in virtually all body care products) and most sunscreen chemicals can act as synthetic hormones causing, among other things, early onset puberty.<br><br>
After checking out the first link I posted here, now I am scared to use any sunscreen on my dd. What to do?? Anyone know where I can get some loose-fitting, long-sleeved, long-legged linen or cotton clothing for a toddler?<br><br>
Another link confirming the above:<br><br><a href="http://www.mercola.com/2004/may/26/summer_sun.htm" target="_blank">http://www.mercola.com/2004/may/26/summer_sun.htm</a><br><br>
Thanks for starting this thread, I think... now I'll have to obsess over this for the next few weeks! :LOL<br><br>
Oh, check out the sunscreen threads in Natural Home and Body care. I am sure I saw some there not long ago.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
I seldom used or use sunscreens on myself or my children.<br>
I did a search and found this thread, just as I was curious to see if there were others who shared my fundamental suspicion of the practice.<br><br>
Never used on either baby; we simply practiced moderation in exposure, big hats/other clothing, and judicious use of shade.<br><br>
As they got/get older, we only use sunscreens for long-term exposures (the beach, trip to the mountains, more than an hr outside in full sun.)<br><br>
I must note that my kids are fairly dark skinned, like myself (Not sure if it is the English or the French blood, but DH is mostly German, and he is fairly dark as well!) We just do not burn easily, and tan rapidly. My kids look like hazelnuts by the second week of spring, even with very minimal sun exposure!<br><br>
My issues with sunscreen are:<br><br>
My kids HATE it! And I HATE to apply it/wear it. It stinks, stings, runs into your eyes, clogs your pores, and is next to impossible to wash off.<br><br>
It blocks or inhibits the production of vitamin D from sun exposure on the skin.<br>
It takes 20 min or so of direct exposure on the face and arms to kick this into gear. (even when we use sunscreen for long-term exposure, we wait at least this long to apply it)<br><br>
I think it hinders the development of any degree of tolerance to sunlight, making one more prone to burns/damage in the long term.<br><br>
The chemicals, yes. A physical would be better, ita.<br><br>
The cost. I must admit, it is sky high, esp. when you look at the quantities you have to use and multiply by a family of 4 for every outside activity. Be real! (of course, if I really felt it were crucial, I would cough it up)<br><br>
All in all, I think moderation is key; avoid mid day sun and get exposure in the mornings and afternoons. Limit your exposure with shade, clothing/hats/parosals/reasonable time limits, use sunscreen sparingly for prolonged exposures only.<br><br>
We also take in full spectrum light (sunlight) through our eyes, and it is a nutrient, in a sense, which helps regulate our body clock, hormones, and brain chemistry, and I do not think it is beneficial to wear sunglasses at all times either. Same basic rules; some moderate exposure is beneficial, but use for prolonged or intense exposures.<br><br>
I guess I am a relic, lol, but I see the current sun phobia as unhealthy when carried to the exteme. yes, we have to be aware of the increased risks of UV due to atmospheric conditions, and yes, we have to protect ourselves from excessive exposures, but we NEED SOME SUN! JMHO.<br><br>
Lilith
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
1,662 Posts
I am VERY fair-skinned/red haired and I have definitely noticed a difference between a 30 SPF and a 45 SPF. Also, my older ds is fair skinned and light haired and rarely burned as a babe so when ds2 came along, I didn't worry about it (he does burn now that he is outside more). I burned ds2 at least twice this summer and he was born in the end June. For some ppl, staying in the shade and wearing clothing from head to toe is I guess a viable option, but my babies overheat and still burn in the shade. I'll take my chances with a sunscreen over guaranteed skin cancer and leather skin when they are older. Not to mention how bad sun burns hurt. I find it much more difficult to force my children to stay indoors than it is to struggle sunscreen on them. And I already avoid peak sun hours.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
138 Posts
My then 3 month DS got a burn after a day of having dilligently kept him in the shade (I've got a little redhead with porcelain skin). I asked a pediatrician friend about this and she said that the current consensus among Drs was that they'd much rather people use sunscreen on babies than risk burns/later skin cancer. According to her the concern was over the PABAs in most sunscreens and that they hadn't been tested on babies so there couldn't be an official okay to use them.<br><br>
We use one with a zinc oxide base (PABA free). Though admittedly, I'm being lazy with my slow dialup and haven't followed the PPs links. Maybe zinc is bad too but we're looking into a sunsuit for him on a houston friend's recommendation. Link below.<br><br><a href="http://www.onestepahead.com/product/26197/216755/117.html#readmore" target="_blank">http://www.onestepahead.com/product/....html#readmore</a>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
125 Posts
I have to side with the pro-sunscreen moms. I am very fair skined and my baby is to. I'll take my chances with and avoid cancer and pre-mature ageing. I never go outside without at least a layer of SPF 15, and that's in the dead of winter. How could I do less for my child.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
11,838 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>mattjule</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I am VERY fair-skinned/red haired and I have definitely noticed a difference between a 30 SPF and a 45 SPF. Also, my older ds is fair skinned and light haired and rarely burned as a babe so when ds2 came along, I didn't worry about it (he does burn now that he is outside more). I burned ds2 at least twice this summer and he was born in the end June. For some ppl, staying in the shade and wearing clothing from head to toe is I guess a viable option, but my babies overheat and still burn in the shade. I'll take my chances with a sunscreen over guaranteed skin cancer and leather skin when they are older. Not to mention how bad sun burns hurt. I find it much more difficult to force my children to stay indoors than it is to struggle sunscreen on them. And I already avoid peak sun hours.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
ITA. If I wear a 30, I get burned after 20 minutes. I need a 45-60.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,837 Posts
As someone who had her first melanoma mole at 16, my babe is getting sunscreen. Not only that, she's getting a big hat along with the sunscreen! I absolutely love being outside, but being diligent about sunscreen is a must.<br><br>
Kind of off-topic, I have to have moles removed every 6 months and keep getting moles with "pre-cancer" cells. I finally upped my sunscreen useage (I tan very easily and rarely burn, but that doesn't seem to make a difference) because I'm tired of having scars all over my body from where the moles have been removed.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
67 Posts
I read not to apply sunscreen on a baby under 6 months of age because their skin is so thin and it gets absorbed into their system. Kinda scarey to think that we apply stuff to our skin that is dangerous if it is absorbed systemically. But the alternatives - staying out of the sun, or increasing your chance of skin cancer - don't look so great either.<br>
I have heard of special clothing made for children that has UVA/UVB protection up to a certain SPF number. I don't know where to get it, but I do know it's very expensive! I try to just cover up. I don't know what I'll do for my ds come the summer yet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,848 Posts
We live in AZ. We walk and take the bus, so get lots of sun whether we want to or not.<br><br>
When possible I avoid taking her out in the hottest/sunniest parts of the day. Hat is mandatory outside, for both of us, and I intend to add sunglasses as well soon. If the temp is over 85, and we will be out for more than 20 min, or over 100 for any length of time, sunscreen goes on all exposed skin, SPF 50. Started putting it on DD as soon as heat plus her refusal to cradle carry in the sling left her exposed. I don't put any above her eyes, rely on hat instead, or on hands because I don't want her ingesting it.<br><br>
We still get tanned, esp. arms. It looks like DD has skin more like mine than DH's, so medium-fair and tan fairly easily and enough to help prevent burning.<br><br>
Not in the least concerned about vit D. We prolly get enough sun on our hands/faces in 5 min to keep us healthy.<br><br>
Fair-skinned people need to worry more about sunlight destroying the folate in their bodies than about vit D, esp. in sunny climes. Skin color variation is a result of adaptation to both probs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
503 Posts
I'm another one who's had some pre-cancerous cells/moles removed from my body. I have to go to the dermatologist every six months to have my entire body checked for melanoma or suspicious moles, and frequently have to have moles removed for testing.<br><br>
As a result, I am VERY pro-sunscreen for myself and my family.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,611 Posts
<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Eli's_mom</strong></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">I read not to apply sunscreen on a baby under 6 months of age because their skin is so thin and it gets absorbed into their system. Kinda scarey to think that we apply stuff to our skin that is dangerous if it is absorbed systemically. But the alternatives - staying out of the sun, or increasing your chance of skin cancer - don't look so great either.<br>
I have heard of special clothing made for children that has UVA/UVB protection up to a certain SPF number. I don't know where to get it, but I do know it's very expensive! I try to just cover up. I don't know what I'll do for my ds come the summer yet.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
I think it gets absorbed into everyones skin... the difference for babies under 6 months is that their livers are too immature to filter it out, so it can build up in their blood.<br><br>
We cover up as much as possible, and then use sunscreen on the exposed skin. I'm a redhead & my kids are pale... pasty white, really. For us, sunscreen is definetly the lesser of two evils.
 
1 - 16 of 16 Posts
Top