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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I was thinking of getting a breadmaker for xmas. Does anyone have one? Will it be one of those things that you don't use and is cluttering up your kitchen?<br><br>
If you do have one, what do you make?
 

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I prefer the upright mixer myself.
 

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I have a breadmachine and love it though I only make loaves of bread in it as I have recipes I adore for rolls and pizza and they are easier to make in my KA than in the breadmachine.<br><br><br>
It you get one make sure to get one that makes a "traditional" loaf. The breadman ultimate and the zorshiki <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad">sp!!???) come to mind
 

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I bought one at a yard sale for less than $10. I hated the way the crust turned out in it. Later I realized that the pan inside had a nonstick coating, so now I don't use it at all.<br><br>
They are definitely convenient, and the "dough only" option is nice - it does all the work and then you can just bake it off in the regular oven. There are probably nicer ones out there than mine - just watch out for the non-stick stuff ! Or just buy a stand mixer instead <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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I've got both a stand mixer and a bread machine, and I do like the bread machine for bread dough better... however, I did get the bread machine for free. I wouldn't buy one, but I do use mine.
 

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I had a really nice one I got for my wedding, it was an Oster, and I literally used it to death.<br><br>
I used it ALL the time, it had a jams and jellies function, it had a pasta function, and it would make the best bread .<br><br>
I used it literally umpteen zillion times until it died a quiet death after 5 years.
 

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we loved our breadmaker and actually used it weekly until it broke -- don't get a panasonic -- it turns out it has a design defect.
 

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I love mine, I mainly use it to make dough.
 

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You can regularly find them in thrift stores and on Ebay....so that tells you 1. people get them and then don't use them 2. that you can get one for cheap and see if you like it.<br><br>
However, I just found something even better--this 'no-knead' bread recipe in last week's New York Times. I just tried it and it worked great...Basically no work at all, just time. (There's also an article on it if you go to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com--see" target="_blank">www.nytimes.com--see</a> the 'most emailed' list.) You use a covered iron or glass pot to bake it in, not a bread pan. The covering steams the bread and makes a nice crust--then you take off the lid to brown it.<br><br><br>
Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery<br>
Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising<br><br>
3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting<br>
¼ teaspoon instant yeast<br>
1¼ teaspoons salt<br>
Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.<br><br>
1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.<br><br>
2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.<br><br>
3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.<br><br>
4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.<br><br>
Yield: One 1½-pound loaf.
 

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We have a Breadman Pro. I love it! It was expensive (about $100) but worth it. We make all our bread in it (2 or 3 loaves a week). This is the cheapest way to get organic, locally grown flour, 100% whole wheat bread. It has some other useful settings too - makes great pasta dough.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks ladies! I think I will go ahead and get one for Christmas. I think my Mom will give it to me for my xmas present!
 

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"However, I just found something even better--this 'no-knead' bread recipe in last week's New York Times. I just tried it and it worked great...Basically no work at all, just time. "<br><br><br>
Yeah no kidding, we just ate loaf #2. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"> And if you need a non-plastic handle for your Le Creuset dutch oven lid, a metal drawer pull works great.<br><br>
We only used our bread machine a few times. I think a Kitchenaid makes way better bread. And the warm rise in the bread machine makes bread that goes stale very quickly.
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>fuller2</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/6517552"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">You can regularly find them in thrift stores and on Ebay....so that tells you 1. people get them and then don't use them 2. that you can get one for cheap and see if you like it.<br><br>
However, I just found something even better--this 'no-knead' bread recipe in last week's New York Times. I just tried it and it worked great...Basically no work at all, just time. (There's also an article on it if you go to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com--see" target="_blank">www.nytimes.com--see</a> the 'most emailed' list.) You use a covered iron or glass pot to bake it in, not a bread pan. The covering steams the bread and makes a nice crust--then you take off the lid to brown it.<br><br><br>
Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery<br>
Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising<br><br>
3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting<br>
¼ teaspoon instant yeast<br>
1¼ teaspoons salt<br>
Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.<br><br>
1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.<br><br>
2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.<br><br>
3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.<br><br>
4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.<br><br>
Yield: One 1½-pound loaf.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
Yes! We did this, without the cast-iron pot or letting it rise in the towel, and it still made great bread! After letting it rise for 15 hours, I just dumped it in the loaf pan and baked it. Very crusty, very good. I made a couple small test rolls from it, and I think I'll be doing that with my next batch.
 

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I have had a bread machine for about 10 years now - can't live without it! My current model is the Breadman Ultimate. I use mine at least 3 times a week for bread, rolls, pizza dough. Makes the whole house smell yummy and the bread is delicious! I love that I can load the ingredients in the morning, set the timer, and arrive home in the evening to the smell of baking bread.
 
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