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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last week, I had my third interview (all three men) where the guy talked *non-stop* about himself for 1 to 1 1/2 hours. I don't mean, "The job entails this." I mean, "I do this, and I'm the kind of person who likes this." To the point that I can't get a word in edgewise, much less talk about why I'm qualified to do the job. Then after an hour and a half, they ask, "So, do you have any questions?" I try to ask a couple of penetrating questions that show how much research I've done on the company, then that's it. It is so frustrating, I can't even tell you. I can't even feel offended when I don't get the job offer, because they know nothing about me except what's written on my resume.

I've been working for over 15 years, and have never encountered this before. Is it my town? Are they taking one look at me and deciding they hate me on sight? If so, why are they spending (wasting?) soooo much of their time with me? (When I asked my mom that, she responded, "Honey, for a man, time spent talking about himself is never time wasted."


I have to add that the HR people I've spoken with ask the normal interview-type questions. These have all been the bosses I'd be working for. What can I do differently in the future in these types of interviews, I wonder? In this economy, it's such a freaking miracle when I even get called in for an interview - I would really like to maximize those few opportunities, kwim?
 

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I've had a few of these. How I handle them really depends on what type of interview it is. If this is a coworker type of person and the interview is more of a see if you fit in type I let them ramble. If this is more of a screening interview with the hiring person I either interject how I'm what their looking for based on what their saying. If I truely wasn't able to get a word in I follow up with a thank you letter. After I thank them for their time I say something like "from our conversation it looks like you're looking for XYZ" and then give them a brief description of what I did for someone else and how it demonstrates xyz traits.

I also like to ask something along the lines of "Have I said anything that would lead you to believe I'm not the best person for this position? or
I know you are interviewing a lot of candidates for this position and I'd like to leave this interview feeling like I've done my absolute best. Where do I stand in comparison to the other candidates so far?" That way I have the chance to clear up anything they think I may need in terms of skills, personality, etc.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Zoey, I love those follow-up questions. Mind if I use them? Thanks for your insight!
 

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It's because interviewing people is a skill and these people who interviewed you are terrible at it.

But you got good advice from the first person to post after your question.
 

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Quote:

Originally Posted by AuntNi View Post
These have all been the bosses I'd be working for.
I wouldn't worry about it then. In fact, I see it as potentially a good sign. The last job I interviewed for had the company's president gassing on about himself forever. I was hired with great contract terms, and he ended up being my biggest backer.

Who knows... maybe he sees you as a potential protege?
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Quote:

Originally Posted by aran View Post
Who knows... maybe he sees you as a potential protege?
Oh, I wish! But I didn't get an offer from any of the three, so that wasn't it. I'm just used to, if it's clear from the get-go that it's not the right fit, the interview is short - not 1+ hours.

I'm glad it worked out for you, though. And I'm kind of glad to hear I'm not the only experiencing this.
 
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