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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi everyone,<br><br>
We have concerns about DS, almost 3, and are still waitlisted with a Dev Ped for possible spectrum things. One thing that has always confused me is that we have never really seen sensory issues. Neither seeking nor avoiding behaviors, and I have tried to educate myself to figure out what to look for, in terms of subtle things. Very little seems to bother him (not noises, doesn't mind getting wet, sandy, muddy, doesn't rock, toe walk or spin, doesn't try to compress himself, etc...at a loss)<br><br>
So 2 nights ago, DS was taking a bath and stayed in a long time. He noticed his hands get "pruney" for I guess the first time and was a little freaked out by it. Anyway, next day, seems fine, goes to daycare but is taken home early with a fever. He keeps checking his hands to see if they are pruney, and then woke up in the middle of the night and kept wanting us to "wipe off my hands" "my hands are dirty" - when nothing was on them. Granted he was fevered and very uncomfortable, but he had never done ANYTHING that resembled this. It was very odd to see. He needed a wet wash cloth to soothe him.<br><br>
Did most of you guys observe some sensory issues by 3 years old? Does this sound like a sensory issue? It sort of does to me - but thought I would go to those that know. Is it possible they could "start" or finally manifest at 3? Or do you think this is maybe a not uncommon toddler thing (checking the hands) coupled with a high fever?<br><br>
Thanks all!
 

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Sensory issues started at day 1 for my guy.<br><br>
I think the pruney hands just freaked out your DS, he may have had a nightmare about it. I think it's probably related to his fever, unless you've seen this behavior pattern over a long period of time.<br><br>
Most spectrum traits manifest by age 3.
 

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Sensory issues started the day he was born.. it just took US 3 years to figure it out.<br><br>
FWIW, my NT 3 year old hates when her hands get pruney in the tub. It freaks her out too..she will talk about it for a while after the fact...
 

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Sensory issues were the first thing that concerned us. She had them from birth and they just got odder and stranger, and more intense the older she got. When she was a year old, it was clear to me that other children her age didn't have such extreme reactions to things.
 

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At birth for us too, though it wasn't until about a year that we really realized she was much more intense and sensitive than many other kids her age.
 

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Some were there from birth.<br><br>
Others got worse with age, or appeared with age. Though some of them might have been there all along and just became more relevant. For example - he didn't *need* haircuts until he was 2. The first few went okay, but they were six months apart, and then around 3, with longer, thicker hair, he flipped out.<br><br>
Some of his issues appear to be delays in maturation, too. He aged out of them, but much later than other kids do, so they caused problems because of the unexpected immature behaviors.
 

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My son has CP, and is a sensory seeker for the most part. Lots of his seeking was present at birth, and his main sensory activity started at about 10 months (he bounces back and forth on the couch).
 

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you can see DS's sensory issues in the earliest sonogram, seriously. From a few weeks gestation he had his legs STRAIGHT out, and continued to even in the full term sonogram. Although it did make it easier to go the gender determination <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">. Good thing DW is tall and has a long torso, that boy refused the "fetal" position.<br><br>
To this day he NEEDS his feet to be up against something (specifically mama or daddy) when he sleeps most of the time.
 

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I didn't really notice DS sensory issues until he was about 9m and only in hindsight. He was such an agreeable baby. I realize this was due to me carrying him a lot. Being in a sling or pack gave him the swinging input that he needed. He was totally happy hanging out in a stroller for long periods. As long as it was moving. When he started walking, well actually running, he just never stopped. He completely desensitized me to falling down. That kid was always falling off the couch. He was just constantly on the go. It was really his lack of verbal language by 2 that started me on the road. SPD was kind of a huge surprise. So that's why he eats sand and puts everything in his mouth at 2yo.<br><br><br>
Reading a book about SPD totally gave me that 'aha' moment.<br><br>
Anyway, now I'm writing a book. Sorry.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks everyone <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>savithny</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/10715697"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">Some were there from birth.<br><br>
Others got worse with age, or appeared with age. Though some of them might have been there all along and just became more relevant. For example - he didn't *need* haircuts until he was 2. The first few went okay, but they were six months apart, and then around 3, with longer, thicker hair, he flipped out.<br><br>
Some of his issues appear to be delays in maturation, too. He aged out of them, but much later than other kids do, so they caused problems because of the unexpected immature behaviors.</div>
</td>
</tr></table></div>
<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/yeahthat.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="yeah that">:<br><br>
Sound sensitivity? Touch sensitivity? From day one! (he HATED being worn.)<br><br>
Uncomfortableness with getting his hands dirty didn't appear until 2 1/2 or 3.<br>
Extreme fear of loud sounds (not just sensitivity) appeared about 2 1/2 as well. Sensitivity to light/light changes appeared about 3.
 

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oh yeah, and for DD she was super sensitive to light and sound from the first second she was born, and her first bath was her first obvious calming sensory organizing experience <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin">.
 

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From birth, and they increased in intensity as he got older. They've only "improved" and decreased with occupational therapy help. His are pretty intense.
 

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From Birth
 

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From birth here, too. Sounds like he is normally scared a bit by seeing his hands look strange. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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From birth for my ds too. He loved being held tightly and rocked, FREAKED out if he could hear me but not touch me, needed to be touched or held at all times.<br><br>
Haircuts, shampooing, anything with his hair, was a nightmare for many, many years, even now, at 14, after years of OT, he's growing his hair out because he just hates haircuts so much. Hasn't had a cut in 3 years. He still hates washing or combing it too, so it's oh so attractive <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink"><br><br>
As soon as he could move or fight back, he hated to be in a sling or pack, stroller, anything that limited his movement, but he loved to be carried and always had to be touched.<br><br>
As he got older, he touched everything with his feet, or put it in his mouth, or broke it because he didn't realize how hard he was holding it (highly insensitive to touch, highly sensory seeking)<br><br>
Shaggydaddy, I can so relate, ds slept sideways across the middle of the bed with his feet in the small of my back until he was at least 6. He still needs to have his feet up against things, there are toe marks on his wall all the way to 5 feet up <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/eyesroll.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="roll"><br><br>
I had never heard of SPD, nor had anyone I knew except my sister (who's a resource teacher who specializes in neurologically affected children), so the dx was a surprise, but fit him totally once I read about it.
 

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Ditto: from birth. My first clue was the odd way he chewed at the breast - from day 1 - instead of really nursing properly; it even baffled the lactation consultant and all the LaLeche people I talked to. As time went on, the other manifestations became apparent.<br><br>
It's possible that perhaps your DS's issues were so subtle or isolated that you didn't notice it until much later.
 
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