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My ds is almost 10 months and either goes barefoot or wears Robeez. My dh and I agreed that we wouldn't put shoes on him as decor, but would think of his comfort first (although he has some really cute Robeez!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/winky.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="Wink">).<br><br>
Well, he's starting to walk around. Whenever we go anywhere he wants to walk around with his hands holding onto us or onto a chair or anything to give him stability. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/sulkoff.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="tiptoe"> So far we've used his Robeez for this, but in the next couple of months I think he'll be walking solo and outside. SO, when should we switch him into Stride Rites - or another good pair - for outside? I guess I'm worried that all of the hard soled shoes I see look like they'll cause him to trip.<br><br>
Thanks!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wave.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wave">
 

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I have heard that as soon as they are walking you should put them in hard soled shoes. Not until they are pretty good at walking though, they need to be barefoot to become good walkers.
 

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Actually I think I've read (can't remember where now, but I'll try to find it) that even when babies start walking, that a bare foot or soft shoe is best, except for protection from the elements. Someone please correct me if I'm wrong - I'll try to find the article I read about it...
 

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Chaja...I found this - Not sure that it clarifies anything though! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> I guess the message is that they don't need shoes until they've been walking for several months.<br><br>
Canadian Paediatric Society (CPS)<br>
Paediatrics & Child Health 1998; 3(5): 373<br>
Reference No. CP98-02 (Formerly MS98-02)<br><br>
Reaffirmed March 2004<br><br>
Shoes are selected for protection, not correction. Myths often confuse parents who are buying shoes for their infants and children.<br><br>
The Community Paediatrics Committee no longer accepts the old belief that a baby must wear shoes soon after birth. Keeping a baby out of shoes in warm, dry conditions is a good idea because walking barefoot develops good toe gripping and muscular strength. Indeed, there is increasing evidence to suggest that wearing shoes in early childhood may be detrimental to the development of a normal longitudinal arch.<br><br>
Until toddlers have been walking for at least a few months, the only purpose of footwear is to protect the child's feet and to offer some grip on a smooth surface. For prewalkers, shoes are not necessary. Ankle boots do not necessarily give more support than low-cut shoes, but are useful because they are harder for children to remove. Shoes must fit the foot properly at the heel and allow enough room for the toes, leaving about 1.25 cm (½") between the longest toe and the tip of the shoe, measured standing up. This allows for sufficient movement of the toes and reasonable room for growth. Never buy shoes unless the child is present to try them on. Soft-sole footwear for protection and warmth is appropriate. For early walkers, shoes provide better fit, stability and safety than sneakers. Used shoes that have lost their shape should be avoided.<br><br>
Corrective shoes are a misnomer and are rarely needed in physically normal children. The appearance of the foot changes with growth. Ninety-seven per cent of all children younger than 18 months of age present with flat feet, due mostly to a fat pad under the foot. At age 10 years, only 4% of children will still have flat feet. Children with mild or moderate flat feet need no specific treatment or corrective shoes. They should not be restricted from any physical activities. For severe flat feet, if accompanied by related pains in the legs or knees, longitudinal arch supports, scaphoid arches, Thomas heels and other orthotics may be tried.<br><br>
Simple metatarsus adductus initially may be treated with passive stretching exercises. If the metatarsus adductus is not reducible, meaning that the forefoot does not return to a neutral position, splints and/or cast treatment in early infancy may be required. Intoeing with tibial torsion tends to improve with age. Patients with persistent intoeing with tibial torsion leading to functional impairment should be referred to a paediatric orthopedic surgeon.<br><br>
Children's feet should be left alone as much as possible. Prescribing shoes to attempt to ‘correct' physiological flat feet, knock knees or bow legs is not useful for the child and expensive for the family. Doctors can avoid overtreatment of mild to moderate variations by explaining this to parents in a reassuring way.<br><br>
References<br><br><a href="http://www.cps.ca/english/statements/CP/cp98-02.htm" target="_blank">http://www.cps.ca/english/statements/CP/cp98-02.htm</a>
 

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We got our 11 mos. old a pair of Stride Rites last month, once she started taking a few steps unassisted. The shoe store guy measured her and everything, and we got a pair that have a lot of flex to them.<br><br>
We still have her barefoot a lot of the time, but we are having her wear the Stride Rites for a few hours a day - to get her used to the feel of being in shoes, and for the protection when she's outside with the big kids at daycare. (God forbid her little foot gets run over by a Big Wheel!)<br><br>
Be prepared to spend about $35-40, and you'll be amazed at how quickly they'll get trashed!
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Thanks!!! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
All of this info is good. I guess I'll slow down and relax a little. So far the Robeez offer plenty of protection for the kind of standing/walking he's doing outside. We are going to Colorado in mid-June and he will start school a couple mornings a week in August, but even then he's in a little classroom and playground with all kids under 3 and no tricycles or anything. I guess I'll see how things are going at each of those stages and see how he's walking and what kind of hazards he's facing.<br><br>
As a Mom, I preoccupy myself with so many things I never thought twice about before!!<br><br>
Janna
 
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