Mothering Forum banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,964 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pretty much says it all.


At what age did your child learn how to pedal a tricycle? (not a trike, bike with training wheels, 2 wheeler or anything like that. A tricycle.)

At what age would you be concerned if they couldn't seem to do it?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,888 Posts
I think my ds COULD have pedaled his tricycle at 2.5 or 3, but he refused. I think it was too much effort or work, but he would take one try and just get off and say he didn't want to ride it.
He was almost 4 before he was whizzing around on it.
I was concerned initially, but then I realized it wasn't a physical issue, so I relaxed. The more I pressed him to ride it, the more he resisted.

He is the same way now with his regular bike. He would rather ride the tricycle because it's faster and more familiar at this point. He'll make the switch over when he's ready, I suppose.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,964 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Yes I do have an ulterior motive for posting this. My daughter is 4 years and 2 months old and cannot pedal her tricycle. We've had the tricycle since she was a year old, and she tries often.. but she just cannot seem to understand how to make it move. Even with me showing her and moving her legs for her, she will still push with both legs and obviously... go nowhere.

She watches her friends who are years younger than her pedal around her, and she will get on hers and try again.. then gets frustrated and ends up uninvolved in their play because she can't participate.

I have long suspected her to have sensory issues, but we have not sought out an official diagnosis.

My dh doesn't seem concerned with her inability to ride a tricycle. Yet every website I go to marks that as a red flag if by 30 months, or 3 years they cannot do it. Yikes. We're far past that age..


In general she can run and climb and things like that, but she is more accident prone. When she runs I still cringe because she falls on her face quite frequently inside the house and outside. She bumps into people, trips on her feet, knocks her sister over, spills her drink every single day at dinner so much that I tend to give her sippy cups because I'm so tired of cleaning up the puddles.


Her sensory issues have always been there, afraid of loud noises to the point that now she can verbalize it. She won't go to a public bathroom unless I agree and promise beforehand not to flush the toilet. She has to be on the couch when I vacuume, and I have to announce it. If she's not.. she will burst into tears, screaming and crying hysterically. Its always been that way.

This is the first year we've been able to go to the beach. Every other time we tried, she screamed because the noise of the waves was too loud. People with deep voices, or people that raise their voice, or even talking sternly will cause her to freak out and start repetitively saying "Don't yell! Don't yell! Don't yell!" while crying. Even her 20 month old sister has caused her to burst into tears because she scared her by yelling.

She is very energetic, never sits still. Is always jumping, hanging upside down on the couch, jumping on it, rocking, kicking her feet, etc. She does watch tv, but its more active watching. And its the only thing that does engage her for more than a few minutes.

She can color, but its not really in the lines. She loves to draw and I can see her pictures. She doesn't read and isn't interested really. She just recently learned to write her name, and is doing great with that.

She can build a tower with blocks. She can go down slides and climb ladders.

She doesn't like to be dressed at all. As soon as she's home she gets naked. And she usually tries to take off her clothes when we're outside at least once an outting. I compromise by letting her take off her shoes. When she wants her clothes off however, she wants it off NOW. And she flips out until we fix whatever the issue is. Cuffs too tight, too hot, tags, etc.. Yet if she wears a sweatshirt or a coat, it MUST be zipped up all the way and buttoned all the way up, with the hood on and tied... even if its not cold out. She hates blankets. But she loves to roughhouse. She loves to lay down on the floor someplace odd and put pillows over herself. She hates people brushing her hair.

She is big for her age. At 4 she wears a size 6X and can wear her sisters size 8/10 shirts with no problem. She wears a size 11 shoe. She is at least a good 6 inches taller than most of the kids her age, some are even older. Which means that 2 years ago before she was even talking a lot.. people assumed she was 4 or 5 years old. And she was often treated poorly by other kids because they thought she had issues since she obviously couldn't talk that clearly yet.
I had to constantly tell people, "She's only 2" and still now I find myself telling others "She's only 4" because they assume she's older by her size.

She does still nurse at night and in the morning. And she does still co sleep.

When it comes to her involvement with other kids, she isn't shy. In fact, she'll go up to someone new and get right in their space. She's trying to be nice... but she doesn't seem to understand that she's too close. She's too touchy. She can't sit still to listen to a story, and is always getting too close to who is reading it. Blocks other kids. Gets in their way. Talks out of turn. She is however, polite. She says please and thank you. She just expects to get what she asked for immediately after she says it.


She can hold scissors, but can't really cut well with them yet. She can cut on a straight line, but hasn't mastered anything else. Games that have simple rules like Simon Says.. she just doesn't get. She acts like she's not listening a lot of the time when I talk, she often doesn't look at me when I speak even if I ask her to. She will look more to the side. In general she is often all over the place.

Anyway... so thats why I'm asking about the tricycle.
Given her situation.. would you get her evaluated? Or just wait and see?
We plan to homeschool so won't be involved in the school system. (unless something changes)

Do these things sound like it could be just a typical 4 yo? Or something that really does need to be looked at more?

ETA: She can be aggressive as well. It seems she has tantrums like what you'd expect from a 2 yo. Punching, kicking, scratching, biting. Yelling and screaming. She will yell and scream when you don't answer her immediately, which can be frustrating for us. Sometimes however, she does things when she isn't even upset. She will randomly walk by you and pinch you. So the motivation isn't always clear. We have tried GD, and alternatively we've tried the time out approach. It doesn't seem to make a difference on her behavior one bit. When she isn't doing those things, she can be very loving though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,964 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Do they usually provide OT for kids outside the school system though? (We have state insurance)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,246 Posts
My daughter couldn't pedal a trike by the time she outgrew it. She now has a bike and just this year (around the time she turned 5) did she work out the pedaling motion. She walked a bit late, crawled a bit late, etc. All of her physical things have been late, but on the other hand she was a very early reader, talker, etc.

The other kids are getting their training wheels off but my daughter will have them for quite a while yet, I'm sure. I was 8 before I could ride a bike without training wheels, so I assume she takes after me as far as that goes. LOL I survived despite my less-than-stellar gross motor skills and I think dd will too.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,973 Posts
My son learned when he was 2...but it was really hard for him. It took a lot of practice...I am not sure if that is normal or not. We had a Kiddio tricylce that has a push bar on the back, and the pedals would move when we pushed it. I think that really helped him learn.

As far as getting your DD evaluated I guess you have to decide what it will change. If they diagnose here with something is it going to change the way you do things? Or do you think things would stay the same? Do you want to know just to know or are you concerned that she needs treatment that she is not receiving?
I hope that makes sense.

I have thought about getting DS evaluated before, but then decided against it. In our situation the issues are minor and I think I am just curious more than anything. I don't think a diagnosis would change the way that we deal with him.
But if I was concerned that he needed something that he wasn't getting then I might get an evaluation...also if I felt that the sensory issues were holding back I would probably get an eval.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
12,445 Posts
Ds was 4 1/2 or 5.

Dd was 2 1/2.

Guess what: DS has sensory processing disorder. His issues include(d): hypersensitivity to touch, hypersensitivity to sound, poor motor planning, vestibular issues (poor balance, couldn't tell where his body was in space) and poor bilateral coordination (getting the 2 halves of your body to work together).

My response: HAVE HER EVALUATED!

Our son's been in OT for about a year and a half now. It's made a HUGE difference for him. He is in public school, but I didn't do OT because of that. I did it because he was clearly uncomfortable in his skin and his sensory issues were making it hard for him to do things that he clearly wanted to do. For example, he really really wanted to visit a fire station, but he couldn't because he was too afraid an alarm might go off. Sound familiar?

Here are two posts/threads that I posted in the Special Needs forum about why we've done OT and what we've gotten out of it (I'm too lazy to retype all this!)
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...=729810&page=2
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...hlight=sensory
http://www.mothering.com/discussions...8&postcount=35

Quote:
ETA: She can be aggressive as well. It seems she has tantrums like what you'd expect from a 2 yo. Punching, kicking, scratching, biting. Yelling and screaming. She will yell and scream when you don't answer her immediately, which can be frustrating for us. Sometimes however, she does things when she isn't even upset. She will randomly walk by you and pinch you. So the motivation isn't always clear. We have tried GD, and alternatively we've tried the time out approach. It doesn't seem to make a difference on her behavior one bit. When she isn't doing those things, she can be very loving though.
This can be directly related to her sensory issues. It sounds to me like she's got a combination of things that she's hypersensitive too (clothing) and sensory seeking behavior -- which often manifests itself as 'random' things.

I've found for our son, that when his sensory issues are under control, then he responds great to GD. When they aren't, we might as well be trying to communicate with a Martian!

Actually one of the added 'side benefits' to his OT is that I'm really seeing GD pay off, not only in how our ds is responding to us, but also in terms of how HE is responding to his sister. A year ago, if his sister had been lying near him and putting her feet on him, he would have screamed and pushed her off (roughly). Just the other night, I heard him say "M, your feet are pushing me. I don't like that."
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,396 Posts
Honestly, I always found that tricycles are hard to pedal. None of my three older ones could pedal one until *after* they learned how to pedal bikes with training wheels. So they were like 4 years old maybe? Not younger.

I personally think tricycles are harder than bikes with training wheels because of the way their feet have to stick forward whereas on a bike with training wheels, their feet are inline with their body.

Why not see if you can borrow a little bike with training wheels to see if that is easier than the tricycle?

I wouldn't worry - if your DD is meeting all other milestones I wouldn't think it's an issue at all. Good luck!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,067 Posts
My son was probably 16 months? Maybe 18 months for his older sister. In my family I'd be concerned about the peddling. HOWEVER much of what you said about her, could also be said about my fairly neurotypical and gifted daughter who's turning 4 within a month. A lot of it is just four.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,530 Posts
I'd say by 2 1/2 all three were riding a tricycle well, meaning, able to steer well, go forward and backwards, and navigate around objects. But simply peddaling to go forwards a few feet? Maybe 20-22 mos.

ETA I just read your follow-up post. I would get her evaluated ASAP. A lot of things in there don't sound right.
(Except what a sweet girl and wonderful mama you and she sound like!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,439 Posts
My DD didn't learn to pedal anything until recently (she turned 4 in June, and I think it was just before her bday). She also had trouble taking steps turn for turn (rather than moving both legs to the same step before moving up), which, if you think about it, is the same motion. She can do both now, suddenly and practically overnight. I was getting concerned myself.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top