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My dd is 2.5 and doesn't answer questions. She repeats what is being asked instead. If I ask her what she is doing, she asks what I am doing. If I ask what she wants to eat, she says "eat." Someone was asking her what color balloon she wanted (she knows lots of colors) and she said "color balloon."<br><br>
I guess she does answer yes/no questions, though she doesn't say yes. If I ask "Do you want an apple?" She either says "Apple!" or no.<br><br>
I was trying to teach her her name today, but she seemed to know I was trying to make her do something and got upset.<br><br>
So, when did your dc's start answering questions? And did you have to "teach" them how to answer, or did they just start doing it one day?
 

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I'm hoping someone has some advice, because my DS is 2.5 and does this also. If we ask "do you want an apple or pear?" he'll say "apple or pear". Argh. I don't remember DD doing this, or if she did it wasn't for long and she'd always answer eventually...
 

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Hmm . . . my son at 32 months, still isn't the best at answering either or questions . . . .like do you want X or Z? He does answer correctly on the rare occassion. I usually stick to yes or no questions. Like, do you want a pear? and if he says no I offer somethng else . . . Do you want apple? . . . until he says yes.<br><br>
So, I guess I don't have the answer. My son's speech therapist comes on Friday. I'll ask her this question and see what she says and report back <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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All of my children have been very verbal, very early. My 23 month old can answer questions very well, but when given a choice, she usually answers with the last on the list of choices unless she really stops to think about it. For example:<br>
"Haley, do you want an apple or an orange?"<br>
"orange"<br>
I ask again, "Haley, do you want an orange or an apple?"<br>
"apple"<br>
She usually just echoes the last thing said.<br><br>
If asked, "How did those colors get on your shirt?", Haley will respond, "I draw marker on mine shirt." If asked, "What do you want for lunch?" she'll tell me what she wants to eat.<br><br>
It took us ages to convince Haley that her name was Haley and not baby! I guess it's from all those times we told her to "look at the baby in the mirror" <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">:<br><br>
I would guess that it's normal for children around that age to echo things. They're working very hard on learning new words, practicing the ones they know, etc. Echoing is a natural way to practice verbal skills. It may help to look for the level of her understanding of the question instead of the verbal response to it. One way to do this is ask questions that involve her doing some sort of action, such as, "Can you get me the ball?" or "Can you give me the blue cup?" or "Where is your truck?"
 

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Linda calls herself "na-na." She points to herself and says "This is a na-na." But she says the same thing about any other child her age, so I don't think she knows it's her name. But occasionally she calls me by my first name...<br><br>
She calls all women older than me "grampa." <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol">:
 

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These replies are making me laugh. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
Ok, this is a typical conversation at my house....<br><br>
Me: Emmaline, would you like an apple or orange?<br>
Em: Um... I like purple.<br>
Me: I like purple too. Do you want an apple?<br>
Em: Apple.<br>
(I get an apple)<br>
Em: No Mommy. I said purple.<br>
Me: Yes, but do you want an apple or orange to eat?<br>
Em: I'm hungry.<br>
Me: What would you like?<br>
Em: I like purple.<br>
Me: Would you like an orange?<br>
Em: I want toast, please. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/lol.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="lol"><br><br>
repeat about 100 times a day for every possible option <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> Oh, she's almost 3...
 

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My son started answering some questions around 18 months. His vocabulary isn't the greatest but he will answer questions like "what color are your shoes" etc. For some strange reason he still does not say "yes or no" but will answer you with other words. He also still refers to himself in the third person which is cute.
 

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Greaseball, my best friend's daughter will be 4 in August, and up until about a month ago that is exactly how every conversation with her sounded. Sometimes her mother would get so frusterated.<br><br>
Basically, one day she just started answering more and more, not all the time, sometimes she still repeats the last word, even if she knows exactly what one is talking about.
 

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My four year old niece had a really severe version of this problem, and is still working on it. She can now answer simple questions "What is your name? Where is your nose? What color is your shirt?" but doesn't always respond appropriately (or at all). At 2.5, I don't think it's something to worry about.<br><br>
About saying "yes"; I've seen many many toddlers who don't say yes even though they say no. My theory is that they hear their parents say no but they rarely hear them say yes. For example, when you were teaching your child about apples, you might say "Here's an apple, would you like to eat the apple?" but not "Yes, you would like some apple!" No is really easy to work into a conversation with a toddler, but most people have to consciously remember to use "yes". "Yes" was one of Eli's first words, because I used it all the time; "Would you like to nurse?" "Eli nurse!" "Yes, you want to nurse!" In a remarkably short time it was "Yes, Eli nurse!" or simply "yes".
 

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If anyone is interested....I actually wrote a story about this on my webpage.<br><br><a href="http://members.aol.com/mushu620/april2004.html" target="_blank">http://members.aol.com/mushu620/april2004.html</a>.<br><br>
You have to scroll down. The entry is called "What Do You Like Better?"<br><br>
Dina
 
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