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We didn't start with a curriculum until second grade.<br><br><br>
I honestly think it's a waste of time, money, and resources to buy one for a younger child. Dabbling here and there, exploring, maybe phonics for a K who is interested is more in tune with a younger child than a packaged curriculum.
 

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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TonyaW</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9948214"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">At what age do you begin homeschooling with a curriculum? Preschool or sooner?</div>
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<span>A whole curriculum may never even be necessary at all - you might find various independent materials and activities that cover all the same things in a way that works better for your individual child. A compay that specializes in a subject can have more specialized ways of approaching it than one that tries to cover it all. This is my favorite catalog for learning materials: <a href="http://www.fun-books.com/" target="_blank">FUN-Books</a><br><br>
But preschool doesn't require much anything to provide lots of fun and enrichment that will lay a good foundation for later -not to mention, of course, filling needs of the moment <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1">. Here's a page I put together on the early years - <a href="http://besthomeschooling.org/gateway/inted16.html" target="_blank">preschool/kindergarten</a> - and underneath the box of articles are annotated links to websites that have loads of ideas for things to do with younger children. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/wink1.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="wink1"> Lillian</span>
 

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<div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
<div class="smallfont" style="margin-bottom:2px;">Quote:</div>
<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">
<div>Originally Posted by <strong>TonyaW</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/9948214"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">At what age do you begin homeschooling with a curriculum? Preschool or sooner?</div>
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We simply follow our children's interests. I don't see any need to ever use a curriculum.
 

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I haven't yet, though I'm thinking about getting Learnables Spanish to start using with DD for the spring. We're using Bob books and some alphabet flashcards for phonics, that's not really a curriculum, and inexpensive workbooks I picked up various places (along with games, manipulatives, etc.) for math. Again, not really a curriculum--when I think she's ready for a math curriculum, I'm going to get Miquon.<br><br>
I have a couple of project books for science experimentation and art, and will soon be getting a beginning sewing guide for DD (I want a little more structure for my attempts to teach her than I had for figuring it out myself, and she really wants to learn).<br><br>
I've thrown together a number of library-sourced unit studies, we check out a bunch of books, including project books, for a single topic, and read/do stuff for that topic until we're bored w/ it. Right now, it's Yule/Solstice/Christmas stuff.<br><br>
The only things I'm even thinking about using curriculum for are things DD has repeatedly expressed desire to learn--and I feel I could help her learn more effectively with curricula at hand. I plan on continuing in this fashion at least until second or third grade, maybe longer depending on DD.
 

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That depends on a lot of things. If you want to buy a curriulum because you simply want to start buying school stuff then sure you can get stuff for 3 year olds. I think it's mainly a waste of money myself but I know some people enjoy having a packet of stuff come or buying a box full of ideas for Monday, Tuesday and so on all laid out for them. Another reason may be because you have an advanced 3 or 4 year old asking for 'school work' and you might want a maths programe or a reading programe just to feel like you know what you are doing. I bought MUS and Five In A Row when my daughter turned 5. Now she is 6 I am getting Handwriting without tears.<br>
So really when ever you and your kids want one.
 

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I feel more and more old school every day, but IMO there is absolutely no need to start any formal academic instruction until at least 6 1/2 or 7 years old (and even later if your child is resistant). This is the standard in some of the more successful school systems worldwide, and it used to be the standard in the US. School started in first grade and there was none of this entering first grade at age five stuff.<br><br>
There is so much available in everyday life that even a precocious academic 4 or 5yo does not need a curriculum to keep them interested and busy.
 
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