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Should Kaya learn to read or learn to write first?????<br><br>
I am so confused...every site says something different! Anyone have experience with this...of course you do! Help me! LOL<br><br>
Kaya is showing an interest in writing...she can write her name with no problems and started that back in January. Now she is asking how to write Nana, PopPop and Jake, our dog.<br><br>
In regards to your answer to my first ?:<br>
should Kaya learn to read or write the capital letters first or lower case letters or both at the same time???<br><br>
I've been confused about this stuff for quite a while...its time I ask the pros
 

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Lower case as this is the form used in text.<br>
I teach all of the lower case letters in K and only then do the upper case. Of course, they gain familiarity w/upper case along the way as the special letters needed for important words, etc.<br><br>
Writing is expressive. Kids learn reading first.<br>
Kind of think of it this way, listening is to speaking as reading is to writing.<br><br>
But, the writing you're talking about is labelling and that's great. My 2 y.o. already tries to write his name. It's just part of identifying their world. Remember, though, that we can't put too much importance on how their letters look; ie. no lined papers or straight lines for awhile.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"><br>
Have fun!
 

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You can't single out any part of language/literacy development and say that one part should happen first. Normally, they happen simultaneously. Speaking and listening is as important as reading and writing - a fact that a lot of people miss. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/greensad.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="greensad"><br><br>
Just go with her interests - if she wants to spell everyone's names, encourage her. These are usually the first words that children learn to write independently. If she wants to read to you, even if it's just memorising favourite stories, encourage that. Eventually, the memorisation of the story will coincide in her mind with the printed words, and she will be 'reading' in the true sense of the word. If she wants you to read to her, enjoy doing it! No need for any pressure.<br><br>
Re: upper and lower case, when you demonstrate for her, use capitals correctly then lower case ie Kaya, not KAYA. However, if she has a go herself and writes words in capitals, be careful not to discourage her by overly 'correcting'. Sensitively showing her how 'I do it, look, I use a capital for the first letter, then lower case letters for the rest' is fine, if she is not going to be put off trying. Only you know Kaya, and how she will respond to your input. Sometimes it's best just to say 'Wow! You wrote Nana" even if she wrote NANA or NNA or NAAN!<br><br>
She will learn to recognise those names before she can write them, but she should be also having some fun just free writing - a whole page of o's or xs or a jumbled up mixture of letters and symbols can be really meaningful to her. Encourage her to write freely and 'read' it to you. Gradually the words will become more legible and 'real' words will creep into the random letters.<br><br>
This is the most exciting time - just relax, and enjoy. It sounds like she's doing brilliantly for her age. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up">
 

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<table border="0" cellpadding="6" cellspacing="0" width="99%"><tr><td class="alt2" style="border:1px inset;">You can't single out any part of language/literacy development and say that one part should happen first. Normally, they happen simultaneously. Speaking and listening is as important as reading and writing - a fact that a lot of people miss</td>
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So true, but in so many of the classes I took while earning my Master's of Educ., they've stressed that there is a progression of skills. Scaffolding is also something that we stress in the teacher educ. programs that I help teach.<br><br>
So confusing w/all of the diff. theories, isn't it. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/orngbiggrin.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="orange big grin"><br>
What grades do you teach? What the current philosophies kicking around in your district? Sometimes, I feel it's like a pendulum. One instructional theory goes out only to reappear in another few years under another name.
 

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BusyMommy,<br><br>
I don't teach at the moment, except for my own children. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile"> However, I remain very involved in the education world.<br><br>
I agree that there is a progression of skills, but reading doesn't happen independently of writing, and vice versa. That was the point that I was making.<br><br>
Regarding continual new philosophies, I think that too many people (and school districts and policy makers) want to jump on just one bandwagon. Eg, phonics <i>or</i> real books. Strategies for learning do not have to be, and should not be, mutually exclusive.<br><br>
Children all learn differently, and need a variety of 'tools' to do the job. They need instruction, and encouragement in using all the tools. ie, they need to learn phonics, and to learn simple spelling rules, but they also need to be allowed to memorise words visually as whole words, and to read simply for meaning, and they need to be encouraged to write developmentally in safety where they can take risks and not be caught up about being 'correct'.<br><br>
A good teacher gives equal attention to all aspects of language development, and realises that children have individual learning styles.<br><br>
A child can write a page of 'nonsense' writing and read it back to the adult on the same day as he works on basic phonics, verbally learns the meaning of two new words, matches spellings on flashcards visually, 'reads' several books from memory, actually 'reads' one book through word recognition and phonetic awareness, and listens to a chapter of a new book. He will be using different skills for each task, and it will be impossible to define his precise learning, but together, a comprehensive language package will foster all-round language and literacy development.<br><br>
In answer to your question, what is the trend for education in the UK now? There is, thankfully, a building interest in brain-based learning and applying the research about the brain and learning, to the teaching of young children. That is where the future lies, not in any one philosophy or scheme or strategy.
 

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As has already been said it's a personal thing, different ways, and one certain one os not right.<br>
BUT in Waldorf methodology (which I have really been diving into) capitol letters come first (they are easier to write because they are more straight up and down), and the kids learn to read by writing, which I think is very interesting. Their first reader, is one that they have written.
 

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Interesting... I've just been following DD's lead. She is too young and not coordinated enough to write letters, though she tries. She'll scribble something, and say, "that's a Q, mommy" or whatever.<br>
But she does know all her letters (in capitals, some of them in lower case - still confuses K and X for each other) and recognizes many words (like her name, Mommy, Daddy, etc.) already. She will see a new word, and ask what it says. She has memorized many books, as well, even the entire One Fish Two Fish! At least in our case, reading just happens! Writing will take longer, as she isn't even three yet...
 

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IMO its one more area where every kid learns differently, just like learning styles or the sight reading/phonics debate. Either you can learn this way or ya don't. Some kids learn reading and writing simultaneously, some read way before they can write, yet others can write every letter perfectly before they can recognize one word. Follow your dd's lead, kids are pretty good at letting us know what they need. If you go a route that frustrates her put it on the shelf for another day.<br><br>
Ds started uppercase letter recognition on his own, from us reading alphabet story books mostly. Because that's what he knew, that's what I taught him to write. I talked about the sounds alot (phonics) but it never interested him, he had memorized a few words that started with each letter, but he couldn't identify the sounds. Somewhere along the way he figured out the lowercase letters mostly on his own (he's a strong visual learner), then he didn't like to write them, lol. Now that he's been writing well for a long time, he does "get" phonics (still doesn't like them), I recently started taking a sight learning approach for him, now he's reading new words constantly.<br><br>
DD is just starting to recognize some letters and is often asking me to help her write them. Whenever ds is doing his writing or practicing words she will constantly hover, to the point of pushing him out of the road so she can see. When his words are on the chalkboard easel she is often coaxing him to the board to tell her what each word is. She has auditory processing issues so I'm thinking she won't learn well with a phonics approach either.
 

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My experience with ds (4) has been he started reading first. He would scribble some letters here and there (usually capital letters) but his reading really took off and he has claimed to not want to write the letters until he turns 5. However, he did write out his christmas wish list last night :LOL
 

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Khrisday, that's so interesting about Waldorf using Cap. letters. I'd love to learn more about their philosophy. THe more we're cramming the curriculum down the throats of our young children, the more I want to opt out. From the little I've heard, Waldorf is entirely developmental.<img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/thumb.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="thumbs up"><br><br>
So funny about the letters. We teach D'Nealian b/c it already has the little monkey tails to transition to cursive. I also teach Slingerland which teaches only simple block letters b/c it feels the monkey tails are too distracting. It's really fun to learn the different rationals.
 
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