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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This has probably been asked a million times. I'm new to this board, and my DH has just given me a green light to pursue an education in midwifery.<br>
I think I stand a good chance of getting an apprenticeship with a very experienced midwife in my area.<br>
Oh, and I'm on a budget!<br>
But I'm a quick learner, I test well, and I am highly motivated for self study.<br>
I would like to pass the NARM exam, but I do not require any state recognition. I just want a good, well-rounded, affordable education.<br>
Thanks for any suggestions!
 

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I'm doing the midwifetobe.com coursework because it suits me best and is approved for my state. Sounds like it could be a good match for you considering what you wrote above, but it isn't for people who need external motivation, don't do well with book learning, etc.<br><br>
Another one I strongly considered was: <a href="http://www.ancientartmidwifery.com/" target="_blank">http://www.ancientartmidwifery.com/</a> but the program of the above midwife to be, with homeschooling 4 kids, being self motivated, loving book learning, and needing a year minimum of local apprenticeship (I'm starting with doula training now) is really what I need. I need to pay very litte, pay as I go, have some choice in my learning process (the projects and books are set, but in each phase you can pick which to do when), the flexibility to do it on my own timeline, etc.<br><br>
Best of luck!
 

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I enrolled in the Midwife to Be program. It was not a good fit for me at all. I found the course to be disorganized and poorly put together. I think you would walk away with a very basic knowledge of midwifery after completing the course.<br><br>
I am currently enrolled with Ancient Art of Midwifery Institute (AAMI). I am extremely pleased. It is a very in depth and intense course, but is very worth while. It is the oldest distance learning midwifery school out there. It also has the reputation for being the hardest.<br><br>
In my opinion there is no comparison between the Midwife to Be Program and AAMI. There is a world of difference.<br><br>
If you look through this forum, you will find lots of discussion about AAMI and other midwifery programs. The Student Midwives Tribe here in the birth professionals forum is a good place to start.<br><br>
Best wishes! and <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/Welcome.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="welcome"> to MDC! This is a wonderful forum.
 

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I am enrolled in AAMI, just finished up my first year... I feel like I'm learning a lot and I have a lot of work to do yet.
 

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I am newly enrolled in AAMI and love what I am doing so far.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have looked at "midwife to be" and AAMI. I lean toward "MTB" because of cost.<br>
I have been a respiratory therapist for ten years, and having completed a clinical program (AA of science in Respiratory Care), I can say that I spent two years and tens of thousands of $ to get liscensed and hired in a hospital so I could then learn how to do actual respiratory therapy. Does that make sense?<br>
AAMI looks like a great comprehensive program. I wonder if having a very experienced midwife as a preceptor would balance out a less expensive program.<br>
What about these?<br><a href="http://www.scschoolofmidwifery.com" target="_blank">www.scschoolofmidwifery.com</a><br><a href="http://www.tradtionalmidwife.com" target="_blank">www.tradtionalmidwife.com</a><br><a href="http://www.midwiferycollege.org" target="_blank">www.midwiferycollege.org</a><br><br>
Anybody have insight into these schools?
 

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The most important part of any program is the part where you learn the hands-on skills. I would contact the person you'd like to train with an see what her ideas are - which programs has she worked with - what is her insight. Would she be a direct entry midwife if she were starting her training now?
 

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Like I said in my previous post, which is best for you all depends on your learning style and other parameters (like cost, distance, etc). I probably should have added this bit of detail: If you dig a bit deeper into the programs you'll learn that they pretty much ALL use the same books and texts with only minor variations (I'm not opposed to reading a few extra books on the side, in fact, I already have started doing so) and they simply differ in the learning styles, work requirements, deadlines, etc. So which is best for you really ONLY depends on your learning style and needs. Do you do best with everything laid out step-by-step, with lots of bookwork, lots of interaction, and set deadlines or do you work better on your own, learn well by reading, and like a more flexible learning style where while the required texts and projects are set, you have some say as to the order you follow? The approaches are different, the content is almost universally the same (atleast with distance courses - my only option). Chances are you already know what learning style will work best for you so pay attention to the requirements, etc, as you study up on the different programs out there. I would suggest you pay more attention to that than cost, though obviously cost makes a big difference, because if it isn't a good fit for you you'll likely struggle in the program regardless of its price.<br><br><div style="margin:20px;margin-top:5px;">
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<div>Originally Posted by <strong>Apricot</strong> <a href="/community/forum/post/13279343"><img alt="View Post" class="inlineimg" src="/community/img/forum/go_quote.gif" style="border:0px solid;"></a></div>
<div style="font-style:italic;">The most important part of any program is the part where you learn the hands-on skills.</div>
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I agree completely with that. Of course you want that backed by as much book knowledge and pre-learning as you can (because it'll atleast give you a head start and you won't feel like such an idiot when you are apprenticing), but the hands on IS the most important part and where you'll really learn the most.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
One more queestion - Should I find a preceptor first, then enroll in a program, or get started with a program and then seek a midwife to apprentice with?<br>
Would my enrollment show my level of commitment?<br>
The lady that I had in mind has not responded yet to my query. So I may have to go to plan B, which is okay. But I was hoping for some guidance from her.
 

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First, I'd suggest trying to talk to her over the phone and/or in person if you really want to set something up. Chances are that she'll want to get to know you and make sure you're a good fit (assuming she takes apprentices) before she decides anything. You might consider asking to simply observe for a while, or even consider becoming a doula to assist in mother support to ease her job a bit, while at the same time allowing you to get to know eachother and also giving you some good hands-on experience in the meantime. Even if you didn't work directly with her routinely, depending on the size of town you're in, it may be that she'll get to know your reputation atleast. (I'm going the doula route --no midwife to apprentice with yet)<br><br>
Second, how long is the course you are taking? The average, from what I gleaned, is about 3 years. Now, 3 years of apprenticeship would be fabulous (!!!), but I just can't do it with my young kids and lack of extra income. Also, it could be wise to get a year of that schooling under your belt so you aren't so green when you do start an apprenticeship and can hopefully be more help than hindrance when you start. I'm looking at probably doing 2 years in my situation, if not 3 (Gah...long story).<br><br>
Third, if the midwife isn't responsive about an apprenticeship now, perhaps you can approach her differently to atleast get some helpful information (and possibly open up some doors for you with her later on down the road)...Tell her you are starting on your path to midwifery and would like to know where she went to school, if she can suggest some schools/programs she feels are worthwhile, etc. Maybe do it in a "I want to know what the job is like/all about" kind of interview format?<br><br>
Best of luck!
 

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I think it's a great idea if you can get the Orientation part of AAMI done before you start apprenticing... but sometimes you just have to jump on an apprenticeship whenever one comes along regardless of anything else. Some students have been apprenticing for awhile before they start AAMI, others do both simultaneously and yet others may finish AAMI before they apprentice. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/shrug.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="shrug"><br><br>
I was one year into AAMI before an apprenticeship came my way, and I do think the fact that I had already begun my academics, and that I had attended births previously as a doula or birth assistant helped me secure that apprenticeship.<br><br>
It just depends on how your path takes you. <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="http://www.mothering.com/discussions/images/smilies/smile.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="smile">
 

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Also, in some areas just getting an apprenticeship is competetive. If you are showing that you're already putting in hard work doing midwifery school, that puts you up higher on a midwife's list of people who are committed.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I've decided! <img alt="" class="inlineimg" src="/img/vbsmilies/smilies/joy.gif" style="border:0px solid;" title="joy">:<br>
I'm going to enroll in AAMI.<br>
Thanks for all your input, ladies!
 
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