Mothering Forum banner

1 - 8 of 8 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
<p>My kids see a conventional doc right now, and he's been fine, because we're never really sick that we need to use him ;)  This fall we've had a bunch of things the kids are passing back and forth and I'm frustrated with the immediate pharmaceutical-meds approach to treating (what feels like) any and all symptoms!  So I want to find a new practitioner for the kids, even if it means I have to pay out of pocket.   </p>
<p> </p>
<p>The natural-minded people I know have suggested naturopaths, chiropractors, and even medical doctors with specific alternative medicine/homeopathic training.  I have names and numbers for all of the above...so what is the difference between them all?, how would I know which one to make an appt with???  Help!</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Thanks!  SJ</p>
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
11,488 Posts
<p>I would probably choose based more on my discussions with the people doing the recommending rather than the specific specialty of each.  There are great HCPs in so many fields, and a fair number in each that I just wouldn't click with--and they could be really good, just not the right fit for my family and/or for me (as the person who does most of the appointments and implements changes).  How compatible are you with the people who gave you each of the recommendations?  I am embarrassed by how long it took me to realize that the highest recommendation doesn't mean anything if I don't have at least a reasonable amount of similarity with the person doing the recommending in how we understand health. </p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
182 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
<p>tanyalynn, thats good advice.  I will think more thoroughly about who mentioned the names I have.  I'd also really like to know what the actual differences are between them all...I was hoping a mama here could summarize that for me, but maybe others are clueless like me, so I guess I'll try googling...</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,144 Posts
<p>It would depend a little as well on your insurance situation.  We see an ND but our state doesn't license NDs so we can't pass along paperwork for claims.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Your choice of practitioner really depends on what you want out of the relationship.  My ND does largely bodywork (naturopathic/osteopathic manipulations and craniosacral therapy) but he also is very good with homeopathy.  He's admittedly good but not great with nutrition.  However, he is very good at identifying problems and thinking out of the box for solutions.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Even within the title of "ND", you'll get a wide range of practitioners because an ND does need to specialize in some field(s) - you can't be a master of everything.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Osteopaths and chiropractors focus mostly on bodywork, with some branching into nutritional advice.  DOs and DCs most likely are insurance-friendly.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Herbalists shouldn't be forgotten either - but again, they probably don't pass muster with insurance.</p>
<p> </p>
<p>Our MD is somewhat "alternative friendly" but I only go to see her for access to testing that insurance will cover.  But usually our lame insurance doesn't include alternative testing, so really she's only good for access to the traditional testing (cholesterol, vitamin D, etc).</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
755 Posts
<p>I've been very happy with the osteopath we see as a PCP here (we moved in July).  Insurance covers my care at the practice just like any "regular" doctor, but I get a professional who has studied both sides of medicine.  For example, for my mild allergies she suggested saline nasal spray and local honey, for my concerns about an ongoing digestive issue she suggested allergy testing, for some concerns about my IUD she immediately sent me for a u/s.  It's a balance I really like having in one practitioner.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,943 Posts
<p> </p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;">DOs (osteopaths) are usually no different than MDs.  They do the same specialties, and have the same medical training as MDs--with the addition of osteopathic manipulation.  (Andrew Still--similar to chiropractic.) Four years undergrad, four years medical school (osteopathic), one year internship (still big in DO circles), 3-5 years residency depending on specialty, possible 1-2 year fellowship after.   Very few DOs these days actually perform osteopathic manipulation--you need to check before you go to one assuming s/he will.  Your best bets are the family practice docs.  DOs are covered the same as MDs by insurance.  Some are into craniosacral therapy as well.  </p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;"> </p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;">Alternative MDs have traditional MD training, but have done some additional study on their own.  Some may have attended a program at a Naturopathic college such as Bastyr, others may have done conferences, still others are self-taught.  Lots of variations.  Our old ped (we moved) was a member of the American Holistic Medical Association.  You might see these docs billed as "integrative".  (Gosh, I miss her.)</p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;"> </p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;">NDs have attended four years of undergrad and then four years of Naturopathic school.  Bastyr University is one of the best known names, but I believe there are 4-5 other accredited ones.. Depending on where you live, they may or may not be covered by insurance.  </p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;"> </p>
<p style="margin-top:0px;margin-right:0px;margin-bottom:0px;margin-left:0px;padding-top:0px;padding-right:0px;padding-bottom:0px;padding-left:0px;">Honestly, for me, I'm most comfortable with DOs and MDs with additional holistic training.  NDs aren't licensed in my state, and I don't believe DCs have the comprehensive medical education to take the place of a primary care physician.  I'd like my physician to have all of the options open to him/her in terms of what may or may not help me.  I liked that my holistic pediatrician would offer up natural remedies if she felt they would work (or had seen them work), but was fully ready to prescribe something if the case warranted it.</p>
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,474 Posts
<p>My son sees an ND primarily for most run of the mill things. ND's are lisenced in my state but cannot prescribe. He's covered by my insurance. We also have a pediatrician that we see for more serious things. Ive only needed to see her once (outside of well visits) as my DS ended up needing antibiotics (yuck).</p>
<p> </p>
<p>We also see a Chiro for weekly adjustments. She does look in his ears and listen to his lungs if I ask her to and if she hears/sees something suspicious, I follow up with the ND.</p>
 
1 - 8 of 8 Posts
Top